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eBook The Journal of John Woolman and A Plea for the Poor: ePub

by John Woolman

eBook The Journal of John Woolman and A Plea for the Poor: ePub
Author: John Woolman
Language: English
ISBN: 1579101461
ISBN13: 978-1579101466
Publisher: Wipf & Stock Pub (August 12, 1998)
Pages: 254
Category: Classics
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 141
Formats: azw lit doc lrf
ePub file: 1662 kb
Fb2 file: 1186 kb

The "journal" or spiritual autobiography of John Woolman was the characteristic literary expression of Quakerism in its first two centuries. Woolman's Journal was first published in 1774 (shortly after his death).

The "journal" or spiritual autobiography of John Woolman was the characteristic literary expression of Quakerism in its first two centuries. His life, as recorded by himself, was the finest flower of a unique Quaker culture, Whose focus, as Howard H. Brinton has put it, was not on the literary or plas The "journal" or spiritual autobiography of John Woolman was the characteristic literary expression of Quakerism in its first two centuries.

This famous journal by John Woolman is a historic text which emblematically details the life of a Quaker missionary preaching against slavery in North America during . has been added to your Cart.

This famous journal by John Woolman is a historic text which emblematically details the life of a Quaker missionary preaching against slavery in North America during the 18th century.

The John Greenleaf Whittier e. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

John Woolman was one of America's earliest abolitionists. He died 3 years before the American Revolution began

John Woolman was one of America's earliest abolitionists. He died 3 years before the American Revolution began.

The Journal of John Woolman is an autobiography by John Woolman which was published posthumously in 1774 by Joseph Crukshank, a Philadelphia Quaker printer. Woolman's journal is one of the longest continually published books in North America since it has never been out of print. The Journal adds to his other published works and gives greater evidence to his character as he discusses ideas of anti-slavery and anti-materialism as well as discussing power's ability to corrupt

Author: Woolman, John ISBN 10: 0806502940. Books will be free of page markings.

Author: Woolman, John ISBN 10: 0806502940. Показать все 4 объявления с новыми товарами.

and A plea for the poor. The John Greenleaf Whittier ed. text. by Frederick B. Tolles.

by Frederick B. and A plea for the poor. Published 1971 by P. Smith in Gloucester, Mass.

John Woolman was a 17th century Quaker and abolitionist. His Journal focuses on his moral, spiritual, and intellectual development. In par-ticular, it depicts Woolman's deep concern for equality and justice. His concern made him act as an agent of restoration towards those whom he saw as being oppressed in his time. He was an open advocate of abolition, and encouraged many to free their slaves. But his influence extended beyond the Quakers. His letters and journeys have impacted many dif-ferent people; his Journal alone has been continuously pub-lished since 1774-a true testimony to the. This journal, which covers his life from young manhood to just before his death, makes.

Woolman's "Journal" was first published in 1774 (shortly after his death). His life, as recorded by himself, was the finest flower of a unique Quaker culture, whose focus, as Howard H. Brinton has put is, was not on the literary or plastic arts but on "life itself in home, meeting and community," a life which was an "artistic creation as beautiful in its simplicity and proportion as was the architecture of its meeting houses..." Its distinguishing marks were not dogmas but practical testimonies for equality, simplicity and peace. These testimonies, once revolutionary in their social implications, were already becoming institutionalized in Woolman's time as the badges of a "peculiar" people." In his quiet way (he must have been the quietest radical in history) John Woolman reforged the testimonies, tempered them in the stream of love and converted them once again into instruments of social revolution.
Zulurr
John Woolman has such a sensitive, kind, and loving heart. He was so concerned for the welfare of his fellow colonial Americans no matter what the color of their skin. He was out there talking to people about the evils of slavery back in the 1650's long before others did the same. His heart was open to God's love and therefore he was filled with love. This love, which only comes from God, poured out onto all. He didn't move or speak unless the Spirit of God told him to do so. He is a model for us all. I highly recommend this book.
Nightscar
I see that John Woolman was instrumental in helping to discourage slave holding among the Quakers. He would be an exponent in the abolition cause of the Quakers who in turn were the first to free their slaves and endorse emancipation to the fullest.
Rocksmith
Clean copy - like new. thanks
Darkshaper
John Woolman is an extraordinary figure in U.S. History. He was a Quaker (FGC), who as a result of his faith and practice was convicted that Slavery is wrong. As a result of his thorough conviction he traveled throughout the Eastern States advocating strongly for abolition. Woolman was one of the earliest abolitionists in America. Some writers argue that Woolman's witness plowed the fields of the American Conscience, so they would be ready for the fights for abolition yet to come. The Quakers were few in number, but made an extraordinary impact on U.S. History. Woolman is a shining example of this.
I loved how Woolman constantly wrestled with his own conscience in his journal. He would worry about just prices for merchandise in his shop. He had a practical sense of right and wrong, of applying "love of neighbor" to the nitty gritty details of life including minute business transactions. This is not the easiest read but worth the work.
-Amos Smith (author of Healing The Divide: Recovering Christianity's Mystic Roots)
Meztihn
The Journal of John Woolman is a book that I have heard about for years without having read. Woolman (1720-1772) was a travelling Quaker writer and preacher who gave up a prosperous life as a clerk/tailor to follow the demands of his conscience.

In the Journal Woolman shares the story that led him on his way. Very human, he wrestles with what it meant to follow his conscience when what his conscience demanded placed him at odds with his community. He was specifically concerned with the evils of slavery. While he spoke sympathetically of those who were unable to give up income connected to the slave trade, he tried to be the example the rest could follow. He became a quiet and important influence in the Quaker community, and one of the movers that brought so many Quakers to the abolitionist movement.

Interesting, compassionate and wise. And certainly just as relevant today to many of our moral issues. There's a startling image that will remain with me of a dignified man refusing to wear dyed clothes in Meeting, since most cloth was produced using slave labor.

Recommended for everyone, but is probably of particular relevance to those with an interest in the Abolitionist movement or Quaker history.

(The book is freely available in many online archives. I read the Citadel Press edition of the book, which contained a quite helpful introduction by Frederick B. Tolles.)
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