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eBook These Demented Lands ePub

by Alan Warner

eBook These Demented Lands ePub
Author: Alan Warner
Language: English
ISBN: 0224041967
ISBN13: 978-0224041966
Publisher: Jonathan Cape; First Paperback Edition edition (1997)
Pages: 220
Category: Contemporary
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 190
Formats: txt lrf lit mbr
ePub file: 1826 kb
Fb2 file: 1442 kb

Alan Warner has a gift greater than the gift of telling a story. He can make what he chooses to tell us seem like a story we were waiting to hear' - Adam Mars-Jones, Observer.

Alan Warner has a gift greater than the gift of telling a story. See all Product description.

These Demented Lands book. After the critical success of his first novel, Morvern Callar, Alan Warner has written an extraordinary, stirring sequel to Morvern's odyssey, confirming him as one of the most original, uniquely gifted writers to have appeared this decade.

Alan Warner (born 1964) is a Scottish novelist who grew up in Connel, near Oban

Alan Warner (born 1964) is a Scottish novelist who grew up in Connel, near Oban.

Alan Warner se the props and stage scenery around us, in this folly of plaster and wood panelling on subsiding muck

These Demented Lands.

These Demented Lands. This novel is set on a Scottish island that contains a variety of weird landmarks and an hallucinogenic cast of characters - including a DJ who wants to set up the rave to end all raves, a visitor whose job is to assess candidates for sainthood and the wonderfully unfazed heroine, Morvern Callar' - Harry Ritchie, Mail on Sunday. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by as on October 5, 2012.

This novel is set on a Scottish island that contains a variety of weird landmarks and an hallucinogenic cast of characters - including a DJ who wants to set up the rave to end all raves, a visitor whose job is to assess candidates for sainthood and the wonderfully unfazed heroine, Morvern Callar' - Harry Ritchie, Mail on Sunday A powerful, hilarious and original novel. About the intersection of lives in the rough and ready communities and wild.

About These Demented Lands. After the critical success of his first novel, Morvern Callar, Alan Warner has written an extraordinary, stirring sequel to Morvern’s odyssey, confirming him as one of the most original, uniquely gifted writers to have appeared this decade. An air-crash investigator haunts the hinterlands of an island–around the isolated honeymoon hot spot, the Drome Hotel–gathering the debris from fallen planes that the islanders have fashioned into makeshift sheds and fences; but what kind of jigsaw is he really assembling as he paces the runway?

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An aircrash investigator gathers fallen pieces of planes and a young woman arrives at the Drome Hotel, strangely familiar. A rave is organised for twisted characters: The Argonaut, The Knife Sharpener, and The Devil's Advocate converge for one last Saturday night at the Drome Hotel.

Hellblade
While "These Demented Lands" may dress up as oblique, it is fairly pale stuff compared to any number of actual surrealist works ("Nadja", "Magnetic Fields", "The Lost Steps", "The Communicating Vessels", etc.) and more coherent than -- at moments -- the charming tyranny of the Belle Époque's "Le Chant de Maldoror". The point being that Warner's work is not by definition "surreal". As for contemporary examples, well, Philip K. Dick comes to mind, but his work is typically more clear in purpose.

So, only guessing here, but the book's conception seems to seek to address some consequence of the actions without consequence that drew such a luminous outline around the ethical blank vividly portrayed in and by "Morvern Callar". As such, it seems an interesting exercise to this reader, shading the impressions of what went before in a different context. Due to its fantastic nature however, these trials usually seem less portentous than the ultimate non-events occurring in the assumed "real world" of the former book and its still curious model railway component. But there seem to be many flaws, least of which might be holding off on identifying the main character until the very end -- short of a few obvious tells -- which strikes me as needlessly manipulative and, worst case, cliché -- a cheap trick. And the greatest of which might be the profound change in voice that occurs about half way through "These Demented Lands". Stripped of the stylistic colouring of Morvern's original first-person narrative, Warner's prose seems to go flat, becoming less distinct, less compelling and far more like many things other than. Still, credit to the author for a valid and brave experiment in avoiding the formulaic trap of many and other writers.
Nilasida
This highly praised book was extremely well-written but not as well plotted as I expected it to be. I realize the story was more surrealistic than realistic, but I feel both the Drome Hotel and the character of DJ Cormorant should have played a larger role in the story.
The characters were as twisted and demented as the story of which they are a part. I felt distanced from them but I think this is to be expected when reading a story such as this one.
I enjoyed this highly-imaginative book as a change of pace and it's obvious that Alan Warner is an innovative, original and brilliant writer. I think These Demented Lands will appeal to those who enjoy surrealistic, hallucinatory, postmodern literature. Those who require more conventionally plotted stories will probably be disappointed. Nevertheless, if you're looking for something different, give this well-written book a try.
hulk
What a mess this is... This "darkly intoxicating brew" (The Guardian) picks up the story of young a young Scottish lass (see his debut, "Morvern Callar") as she returns from the continent. She comes to a wee little island where honeymooners stay at a weird hotel, and there's a cast of supporting bizarros. Really tough to get through and none too rewarding despite occasionally clever language at times. Warner's got talent, but try his much more accesible "The Sopranos" before trying this.
Karon
This is a great book, continuing the story from Morvern Callar. However at times it is very confusing and the beginning does not make much sense to most people, but don't give up it all becomes clear as the book progresses.

Not as straightforward as Morvern Callar but when you get into the characters it is really amazing.
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