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eBook Hammerhead Ranch Motel ePub

by Tim Dorsey

eBook Hammerhead Ranch Motel ePub
Author: Tim Dorsey
Language: English
ISBN: 0006513069
ISBN13: 978-0006513063
Publisher: HARPERCOLLINS (2000)
Pages: 304
Category: Contemporary
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 915
Formats: rtf mbr rtf doc
ePub file: 1777 kb
Fb2 file: 1209 kb

Tim Dorsey Hammerhead Ranch Motel. The second book in the Serge Storms series, 2000. Let us consider that we are all partially insane.

The sequel to the remarkable Florida Roadkill – an extraordinarily original novel from a new young American author – a funny, stylish, irreverent and shocking thriller. Tim Dorsey's sparklingly original debut novel – Florida Roadkill – was a hyper, jump-cut, manic black comedy that took Florida Noir to new extremes. Fellow writers and critics were quick to acclaim the bright new talent that created a high-voltage crime tale suffused with blacker-than-black humour and an infectious fascination with Florida 's strange beauty. Hammerhead Ranch Motel.

Hammerhead Ranch Motel follows up Dorsey’s first Book ( Florida Roadkill ) and is definitely superior as far as I’m .

Hammerhead Ranch Motel follows up Dorsey’s first Book ( Florida Roadkill ) and is definitely superior as far as I’m concerned. Good Old Serge is in hilarious & in high-demented form most all of the time.

Tim Dorsey Hammerhead Ranch Motel The second book in the Serge Storms series, 2000 For Eugene Morse Let us consider that we are all partially insane. It will explain us to each other

Tim Dorsey Hammerhead Ranch Motel The second book in the Serge Storms series, 2000 For Eugene Morse Let us consider that we are all partially insane. It will explain us to each other. Mark Twain Prologue Florida ’s beauty creates the illusion of civilization. It is a thin but functional veneer, like fake-wood contact paper stuck to flimsy particle board.

Hammerhead Ranch Motel. The sequel to the remarkable Florida Roadkill – an extraordinarily original novel from a new young American author – a funny, stylish, irreverent and shocking thriller. Tim Dorsey’s sparklingly original debut novel – Florida Roadkill – was a hyper, jump-cut, manic black comedy that took Florida Noir to new extremes. Fellow writers and critics were quick to acclaim the bright new talent that created a high-voltage crime tale suffused with blacker-than-black humour and an infectious.

Pack up your bags and head to Tim Dorsey’s slice of America. There's a room with your number on it at the Hammerhead Ranch Motel. Washington Post Book World

Pack up your bags and head to Tim Dorsey’s slice of America. Leave your rational mind at home and come well armed. What people are saying about Serge Storms: Over-the-top, off-the-wall, ough, Florida insanity was never described so authentically and with such enthusiasm. Washington Post Book World. The characters in Tim Dorsey’s raucous novel would be shot on sight in any other state. Excellen. almost exploded with laughter as I read Dorsey’s novel.

The second book in the Serge Storms series. All those cheesy houses across the street and that awful Hammerhead Ranch Motel next door that they couldn’t manage to close down. Mrs. Ploomfield lived at 1193 Gulf Harbor Drive in a first-floor unit of Calusa Pointe Tower Arms. There was little traffic this morning, only a brown delivery truck at the curb.

Hammerhead Ranch Motel book. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

Tim Doroey, author of the raucous, raw-edged, hilariously bent literary joy-ride, Florida Roadkill, now invites you back to his Sunshine State-not the tourist-mecca peneioner-paraclise the Chamber of Commerce would have you visit, but an Eden verdant with lost drug money; a center of lunatic, gravity, drawing fugitives, gangsters, losers, sociopaths and psychos of every flavor and.

Keath
I'd read one of the authors other books (the forgettable name escapes me), and found it likeable if goofy. Thought I'd give a second book a whirl. Nope. Forced myself to read it until I got to the 40% mark and had to give up. The story line (if that's what you'd call it) meandered all over the place, with too many mental midgets for characters. Give this one a pass.
Painwind
Another hilarious romp through Florida with the psychotic Serge Storms. This time the adventure takes place during an epic hurricane, and much like the first Serge book, the novel is a bunch of random events, with random characters, that somehow all come together in the end. I give this novel four out of five stars because it delivers and continues on the chaos from the first novel, but the overall feel of these books are starting to wear thin. For people who loved the first Serge book, Florida Roadkill, you will enjoy this one as well, yet the chaos is starting to get dull. For new readers, I would strongly suggest reading the first one first because it tells the tale of how the 5 million dollar briefcase came to be. My review is probably lacking because I do not want to give away too many spoilers, but nothing I can say of this book is different than what I said for the last one.
Buriwield
Hammerhead Ranch Motel follows up Dorsey’s first Book (“Florida Roadkill”) and is definitely superior as far as I’m concerned. Good Old Serge is in hilarious & in high-demented form most all of the time. That is, except some times when he’s absolutely violent & vicious (a turn off for me), or is spouting Local geographic references. Both are overdone at times. A few “local” area notes are OK for (in this case) Tampa, Florida Natives, but were boring for a non-resident like me – especially when they go on, and on as they did a couple of times.

Dorsey’s many Characters are truly hilarious and unlike others except maybe like Hiaasen’s or Moore’s, although there are more of them here. They’re wacky, unpredictable & in so many variations that it keeps you wondering how anyone could cook up that many zanies & comedic situations in one place & at one time. Can’t say I was laughing out loud a lot, but it was truly a fun read, and I enjoyed all except the extreme violence.

I also read his #4 of the Series (Triggerfish Twist) before this one, and I enjoyed it more than either “Hammerhead” or “Roadkill”. That may have influenced my expectations for Hammerhead, because Dorsey has improved with “age” IMO. So, I look forward to reading more Dorsey Novels (probably Orange Crush next).
Ffan
Tim Dorsey was born in Indiana, moved to Florida at the age of 1, and grew up in a small town about an hour north of Miami called Riviera Beach. He graduated from Auburn University in 1983. While at Auburn, he was editor of the student newspaper, The Plainsman.

From 1983 to 1987, he was a police and courts reporter for The Alabama Journal, the now-defunct evening newspaper in Montgomery. He joined The Tampa Tribune in 1987 as a general assignment reporter. He also worked as a political reporter in the Tribune’s Tallahassee bureau and a copy desk editor. From 1994 to 1999, he was the Tribune’s night metro editor. He left the paper in August 1999 to write full time.

Tim has since published seventeen novels in several languages: Florida Roadkill, Hammerhead Ranch Motel, Orange Crush, Triggerfish Twist, The Stingray Shuffle, Cadillac Beach, Torpedo Juice, The Big Bamboo, Hurricane Punch, Atomic Lobster, Nuclear Jellyfish, Gator A-Go-Go, Electric Barracuda, When Elves Attack, Pineapple Grenade, The Riptide Ultra-Glide andTiger Shrimp Tango (Jan '14).

He lives in Tampa with his family.
Larosa
I discovered Tim Dorsey via Amazon--If you like ____, then you might like Tim Dorsey. And I do. I bought that book and then have ordered/will order all of the rest of his. If you like Carl Hiaasen, Randy Wayne White, or Dave Barry, try Tim Dorsey.
These books are hysterical, full of competent and incompetent criminals, wacky retired people, drug sellers/seekers/users, tourists, snowbirds, charter fishermen, and hardscrabble natives. It is fun just to keep track of all the plot lines. While I have never been to Florida, I imagine that all that Florida heat and sunshine are sure to create some real-life truth behind Dorsey's plots and characterizations. What he does with them is very funny.
Ndlaitha
Episodic plots, a plethora of characters, truly sadistic violence, and some occasional laugh out loud funny moments. That is how I would summarize "Hammerhead Ranch Motel". In his second novel Tim Dorsey writes at a dizzying pace that introduces a ton of characters, and even more plot twists. And for a beach read, it works.
I continue to be amazed at how Dorsey manages to stay on top of a convoluted and intertwined plotline. He is truly skilled at bringing his many subplots together in a climactic scene, that in some twisted manner, makes sense. At least in the world of the novel. For that reason I would not recommend reading this text over an extended period of time because the multitude of subplots and characters do actually come together, and if you read over a protracted period you will forget many of them.
Dorsey also does a nice job of creating a standalone novel, even though "Hammerhead" follows immediately after its predecessor, Dorsey's debut novel "Florida Roadkill". You can read, and enjoy, "Hammerhead" without having read "Roadkill", although I would not recommend it.
Mr. Dorsey is often compared to Christopher Moore and Carl Hiaasen, but I don't think that is a fair comparison. They are different writers, with very different styles. Dorsey's books are far more violent (and at times that disturbs me, but it is what it is) and he has a very twisted and very clever way of using figurative language. Some of the funniest, and most vulgar, similes I have ever come across!
Enjoy the stay at the "Hammerhead Ranch Motel".
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