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eBook Nadirs (European Women Writers) ePub

by Herta Muller,Sieglinde Lug

eBook Nadirs (European Women Writers) ePub
Author: Herta Muller,Sieglinde Lug
Language: English
ISBN: 0803231970
ISBN13: 978-0803231979
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press; First Edition edition (August 1, 1999)
Pages: 126
Category: Contemporary
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 368
Formats: mbr docx rtf azw
ePub file: 1260 kb
Fb2 file: 1699 kb

NADIRS was the first published book of the most recent Nobel laureate, Herta Müller. It first was published in 1982, while Müller still lived in Ceausescu's Romania (albeit after state-censorship).

Only 16 left in stock (more on the way). Only 13 left in stock (more on the way). NADIRS was the first published book of the most recent Nobel laureate, Herta Müller. It consists of one lengthy story or novella, "Nadirs", and fourteen other stories or pieces, some very brief, somewhat like a Kafka parable.

Herta Müller, winner of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Literature . Sieglinde Lug is a professor emerita of German and comparative literature at the University of Denver. Nadirs (Niederungen) European Women Writers Series.

Sieglinde Lug is a professor emerita of German and comparative literature at the University of Denver. Herta Müller, Sieglinde Lug. Перевод: Sieglinde Lug. Соавтор. Sieglinde Lug. Издатель. University of Nebraska Press, 1999.

Nadirs: (Niederungen). By Herta Müller, Sieglinde Lug. No cover image. Nadirs: (Niederungen). Juxtaposing reality and fantasy, nightmares and dark laughter, Nadirs is a collection of largely autobiographical stories based on Herta Müller's childhood in the Romanian countryside. The individual tales reveal a child's often nightmarish impressions of life in her village

Juxtaposing reality and fantasy, nightmares and dark laughter, Nadirs is a collection of largely autobiographical stories based on Herta Muller's childhood in the Romanian countryside.

Juxtaposing reality and fantasy, nightmares and dark laughter, Nadirs is a collection of largely autobiographical stories based on Herta Muller's childhood in the Romanian countryside. The individual tales reveal a child's often nightmarish impressions of life in her village. Seamlessly mixing reality with dream-like images, they brilliantly convey the inner, troubled life of a child and at the same time capture the violence and corruption of life under an oppressive state.

Sieglinde Lug, professor of German at the University of Denver, provides the English translation.

Nadirs by Herta Muller, who recently won the the Nobel Prize for Literature, is a collection of mostly autobiographical short stories about surviving a communist regime and personal drama. Sieglinde Lug, professor of German at the University of Denver, provides the English translation.

Nadirs by Herta Müller - book cover, description, publication history. September 1999 : USA Paperback.

An early masterpiece from the winner of the Nobel Prize hailed as the laureate of life under totalitarianism. Just as the father in the house in which we live is our father, so Comrade Nicolae Ceausescu is the father of our country

An early masterpiece from the winner of the Nobel Prize hailed as the laureate of life under totalitarianism. Romania-the last months of the Ceausescu regime. Just as the father in the house in which we live is our father, so Comrade Nicolae Ceausescu is the father of our country. And just as the mother in the house in which we live is our mother, so Comrade Elena Ceausescu is the mother of our country.

Müller's first book, Niederungen (Nadirs), was published in. .Brigid Haines and Margaret Littler, Contemporary German Women's Writing: Changing the Subject, Oxford: Oxford UP, 2004.

Müller's first book, Niederungen (Nadirs), was published in Romania in German in 1982, in a state-censored version. Herta Müller wrote the foreword for the first publication of the poetry of Liu Xia, wife of the imprisoned Nobel Peace Prize recipient Liu Xiaobo, in 2015. Müller also translated and read a few of Liu Xia poems in 2014. Brigid Haines (e., Herta Müller.

by Herta Müller, translated by Sieglinde Lug 126pp, Nebraska, £. 9 . I have a lot of sympathy for anyone who grew up in Ceausescu's Romania. In Hungary, in Poland, in Czechoslovakia, even in East Germany, things weren't great for the majority, but if you behaved, you could have peace and a modicum of comfort. Of all the writers who've won the Nobel prize, Müller must have the most rudimentary prose style. The citation from the Nobel committee refers to the "frankness of prose". The short story collection Nadirs was Müller's first book, published in 1982 in Romania in a "censored" form, and I think I can guess which bits fell by the wayside.

Juxtaposing reality and fantasy, nightmares and dark laughter, Nadirs is a collection of largely autobiographical stories based on Herta Müller’s childhood in the Romanian countryside. The individual tales reveal a child’s often nightmarish impressions of life in her village. Seamlessly mixing reality with dream-like images, they brilliantly convey the inner, troubled life of a child and at the same time capture the violence and corruption of life under an oppressive state.
Ndav
Nadirs is a lovely book. A collage of memories, beautiful, haunting, fractured, and austere. My beef is with the Bison edition. I read Nadirs side-by-side with the German language version. Passages, beautiful passages of the book in English are completely omitted. Whether through poetic license or just negligence, the omissions are inexcusable. Also I don't understand the translation of the title "Nadirs." The German title translates as "Lowlands" which to my mind much more closely reflects the location and the aesthetic tensions of the work.

As the Bison edition is the only way to read this Müller's first published work in English, it's worthy of purchase, even though Bison chose not to give you the whole work.
Skilkancar
This collection of short stories and one-page snapshots depicts in a naturalistic manner (`feces with white worms crawling on them') a Romanian village after World War II seen through the eyes of a child.
It is a world of flowers and urine, of desolate poverty, alcoholism (`in the summer the whole village smells of schnapps'), adultery, sickness and violence by drunken fathers and by children against children (`the school children write on him with chalk till he cries').
The villages still suffers from the ravages of the war.

In this stagnant world the child has dreams of beauty: `I lay down in the tall grass and made myself trickle into the earth. I waited for the big willows to come to me to root their branches in me and spread their leaves in me. I hoped they would say: you are the most beautiful swamp in the world.', but also nightmares: `I saw Mother lying naked and frozen in Russia, with scraped legs and green lips from the turnips.'

Overall, there is a lack of real emotion (also for the reader). The text nearly never transcends the pure descriptions (`Village Chronicle'), the dry sense observations or the jejune repetitions.

Only for Herta Müller fans.
Lost Python
I'm shocked at how few writers, editors, etc that I speak to do not know Mueller's work. In my opinion, no one, but no one can craft such a complete scene without heavy plot lines, relying only on emotional impression through her masterful use of descriptive word-painting. I give this book as a gift to my writer friends, and keep a copy on my iPad whenever I need a jolt of beautiful writing to inspire my own work.
lubov
Nadir
Romanian-German author POV collection of memories of life in Pre-wall fall Romania. The animal abuse will make you sick alone.
Incest stories as normal, as well as alcoholism is as old as the hills.
Her writing style is why she received (deserved) the Nobel. When you read her stories,
every sentence could be the title of a chapter. Almost Hemmingway-esque
in the amount of information per sentence is compounded by the 'reporting'
or observational style of the stories offering little (very little) editorials.
Malakelv
Some of the most beautiful writing I've ever read.
Arilak
A good read
Mejora
NADIRS was the first published book of the most recent Nobel laureate, Herta Müller. It first was published in 1982, while Müller still lived in Ceausescu's Romania (albeit after state-censorship). It consists of one lengthy story or novella, "Nadirs", and fourteen other stories or pieces, some very brief, somewhat like a Kafka parable. I was impressed by the one other Müller work I have read, "The Passport", but NADIRS leaves me cold - indeed, it is painful.

One principle I had set for myself in reviewing books on Amazon was not to review a book unless I had read it (recently) in its entirety. That is the chief reason why to date I have not posted any one-star reviews; as soon as I realize that a book is that execrable, I will not waste further time and read it to the end. Now, I confess that I was unable to read NADIRS from beginning to end. Nonetheless, I am breaching my own principle, in large part because I feel I did read enough of it to fairly judge it by my own critical standards, such as they are.

As in "The Passport", Müller's prose is stark and choppy. There is even more of the surreal and the fantastic than there was in "The Passport". The theme of the book is the brutal, nonsensical, and oppressive conditions of everyday life in the Romania of Müller's girlhood. Those three aspects combine for some very unpleasant reading - like a ball-peen hammer continually tapping on my skull while atonal modern music plays at high volume, accompanied by (although on a different rhythm entirely) a searingly bright strobe light. It is painful, at least intellectually.

In trying to figure out my strong adverse response to NADIRS, I first tried out a theory I have from time to time entertained in the past - namely, that for me literature and the arts should make life more enjoyable or meaningful. Since I know enough about the miseries and cruelties of the world (pretty much vicariously, thankfully), I don't need another dose - at least given the ever-decreasing amount of time left to me. But that theory doesn't adequately explain my discontent, because (to say nothing of Dante and Dostoevsky) I did appreciate "The Passport", which also is a grim, depressing portrayal of life in Ceausescu's Romania, told through a mixture of fantasy and stark realism. What, then, is the difference? For one thing, "The Passport" is not as saturated with nightmarish breaks with reality as is NADIRS, perhaps because in that earlier work Müller had to be less direct, more opaque, in her critical depiction of life in Romania since she still lived there. But more so, I suspect that "The Passport", although only a few years later, simply is the work of a more mature and accomplished writer.

I cannot recommend NADIRS. My two-star assessment may be on the generous side. But I will give Müller at least one more try, probably "The Land of the Green Plums".
Anamazing work by the Nobel Prize-winning author. I shared this with a native of Romania, whose father told her a great deal about the German-speaking section, and she said the book was highly realistic.
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