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eBook Alexandra ePub

by Valerie Martin

eBook Alexandra ePub
Author: Valerie Martin
Language: English
ISBN: 0753818450
ISBN13: 978-0753818459
Publisher: Orion Pub Co (February 2005)
Pages: 208
Category: Contemporary
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 729
Formats: lit lrf rtf txt
ePub file: 1280 kb
Fb2 file: 1491 kb

Valerie Martin is one of America's finest contemporary novelists, best known for her Orange Prize-winning PROPERTY and also the acclaimed MARY REILLY, which was filmed by Stephen Frears. Her most recent novel, her tenth, is THE GHOST OF THE MARY CELESTE.

Valerie Martin is one of America's finest contemporary novelists, best known for her Orange Prize-winning PROPERTY and also the acclaimed MARY REILLY, which was filmed by Stephen Frears. She is the author of three collections of short stories and SALVATION, a biography of St Francis.

Valerie Martin is the author of nine novels, including Trespass, Mary Reilly, Italian Fever, and Property, three collections of short fiction, and a biography of St. Francis of Assisi, titled Salvation

Valerie Martin is the author of nine novels, including Trespass, Mary Reilly, Italian Fever, and Property, three collections of short fiction, and a biography of St. Francis of Assisi, titled Salvation. She has been awarded a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, as well as the Kafka Prize (for Mary Reilly) and Britain’s Orange Prize (for Property).

In Alexandra, Martin creates a slowly shocking erotic odyssey, a bittersweet love story, a chilling tale of a man destroyed by a desperate and tragic experiment in passion. A strange and artful novel. Margaret Manning, Boston Sunday Globe.

Valerie Martin is the author of ten novels, including Trespass, Mary Reilly, Italian Fever, and Property, three collections of short . Martin’s last novel, The Confessions of Edward Day was a New York Times notable book for 2009

Valerie Martin is the author of ten novels, including Trespass, Mary Reilly, Italian Fever, and Property, three collections of short fiction, and a biography o. .St. Francis of Assisi titled Salvation. Martin’s last novel, The Confessions of Edward Day was a New York Times notable book for 2009. A new novel The Ghost of the Mary Celeste is due from Nan Talese/Random House in January 2014, and a middle-grade reader Anton and Cecil, Cats at Sea co-written with Valerie’s niece Lisa Martin, will be out from Algonquin in October of 2013. Valerie Martin has taught in writing programs at Mt.

by. Martin, Valerie, 1948-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on April 9, 2012.

Valerie Martin creates memorable characters: the pompous butle. n unctuous landlor. nd the utterly convincing Mary, with a housemaid’s eye, a servant’s rigorous sense of place-and a sufferer’s hard won dignity.

Alexandra by Valerie Martin. Results (1 - 30) of 115. 1.

Valerie Martin is a great writer. Her voice is dark yet poignant, strange but beautiful-shocking and chilling. Daphne du Maurier sprang to mind as I read this book. Martin's male narrative style reminds me a great deal of Du Maurier. All in all, I cannot recommend this unique novel enough. Though slow at first, it takes you to a ride that is sexy as well as suspenseful.

A chilling tale of murder and passion deep in the bayou from the Orange Prize-winning author of Property  . Remove from Wishlist.

Valerie Martin (born 1948, Missouri) is an American novelist and short story writer. Her novel Property (2003) won the Orange Prize for Fiction. In 2012, The Observer named Property as one of "The 10 best historical novels"

Valerie Martin (born 1948, Missouri) is an American novelist and short story writer. In 2012, The Observer named Property as one of "The 10 best historical novels". Although Martin was born in Missouri, she was raised and educated in New Orleans, Louisiana. She graduated from the MFA Program for Poets & Writers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Ahieones
I was very excited to read this book, after reading the reviews of the author. The book started out strong, with great writing which made it all the more disapointing midbook when the whole thing gradually fell apart, losing momentum, believability, and interest along the way.

It was almost as if the book was written by two different people, and the one that took over in the second half needs to go back to writing school. The characters are not at all developed, their motivations are very unclear and never explained. Plot devices are introduced, for example the double of the author, and then the device is not explored or explained. In several places the narrator foreshadows an event that when it actually happens sinks like a lead ballon.

As an example, the narrator has an attack of fever, (was he set up? was he poisoned?) during which the other characters seem to be menancing him, or something, which is never explained and is not followed through on after he recovers. Actually at this point, the whole book seemed to fall apart. Why does one character want him to deliver her baby? How is he an offering? Why does Alex decide to leave? Why does he decide to stay? Why was Alex even interested in him anyway? Oh, and this was the most non-erotic erotic novel I have ever read.

I can't recommend this book, even though the first 50 pages or so are well written.
greed style
Claude is forty-nine, right smack in the center of middle age. He despises his current lover for her flamboyant personality and patent desperation, but mostly for her age, even though she is around his age. One night, he meets Alexandra--a thirty-year-old barmaid. She fascinates him, intrigues him so that he cannot help starting a lustful affair with her. Uncharacteristic things begin to happen to him afterwards; he quits his job, dumps his middle-aged girlfriend, and shows off his younger girl to his former workmate. But the most uncharacteristic thing of all is that he agrees to travel with Alexandra to meet her friend. They soon embark on a strange and erotic relationship that soon becomes deadly.

This is one dark novel! Claude is unlikable. His personality, while well fleshed out and real, is repugnant from the beginning and you don't feel much sympathy for him. When he begins to feel that he is being played for a fool... well, I felt that he deserved it. Alexandra, on the other hand, is interesting, intriguing and enigmatic throughout the story -- her devil-may-care personality makes her quite unique as well. Valerie Martin is a great writer. Her voice is dark yet poignant, strange but beautiful--shocking and chilling. Daphne du Maurier sprang to mind as I read this book. Martin's male narrative style reminds me a great deal of Du Maurier. All in all, I cannot recommend this unique novel enough. Though slow at first, it takes you to a ride that is sexy as well as suspenseful. Beware of some loose ends and confusing plot devices though.
Whitebinder
Wow, what an excellent book. I picked this novel up on a whim after skimming a few pages, and boy am I glad I did. I haven’t been this caught up in a story in a long time. As a man I was shocked by how well a female author was able to write a character whose inner dialogue articulated male thoughts and feelings so well. I actually became physically anxious waiting to find out what would happen to Claude and Alexandra.

There are one or two confusing plot points that I had to go back and work out, but eventually did make sense (to me) after a little thought.

Am I raving a little about this book? Maybe, but I can’t help it, I loved this novel.
Pedar
From the Bascove illustration on its cover to its haunting last line, Valerie Martin's "Alexandra" will hold you in thrall like a witch's spell. Martin's plots are so devious she simply cannot be outguessed. All you can do is hang on for dear life as her story careers exhilaratingly through its endless thrilling surprises and shocking revelations. After reading this novel I was unable to read another book for nearly a week. Everytime I tried "Alexandra" kept intruding between me and the new story. I couldn't get it out of my head, and neither will you be able to. Valerie Martin's imagination ought to be registered with the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms as both a dangerous implement and an addictive substance. Do yourself a favor and get hooked.
Ffleg
Couldn't put it down -- Calling Valeria Martin "the female Faulkner" doesn't do her justice... a tour de force to be able to write a sexually charged novel from the male perspective... Gave me much insight into my own dark feelings of sexuality. No coincidence that her most famous work, "Mary Reilly", is based on "The Strange Tale of Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde," by Robert Louis Stevenson. He wrote, "All men have thoughts which would shame Hell." Martin explores this familiar-but-taboo terrain, uniting us all in the humanity of our deepest desires. This book grows on you, and you will be haunted by it if you're at all fascinated by the mystical nature of sexuality!
Akisame
I was very disappointed in this book, especially considering Ms. Martin's extensive writing career. The characters were so unlikable that I could not bring myself to care about any of them. The plot was unbelievable and there were multiple developments that suddenly popped up only to go nowhere.

I cannot recommend this book.
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