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eBook Something to Tell You ePub

by Hanif Kureishi

eBook Something to Tell You ePub
Author: Hanif Kureishi
Language: English
ISBN: 0571209777
ISBN13: 978-0571209774
Publisher: Faber & Faber; First Edition edition (2008)
Pages: 345
Category: Contemporary
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 707
Formats: lrf mobi doc mbr
ePub file: 1961 kb
Fb2 file: 1734 kb

Home Hanif Kureishi Something to Tell Yo. His childhood was dedicated to electronic devices, and as I might have told you, he’s doing well in trash TV, working for a company that specialises in showing disfigurements and plastic surgery. What do they call it, car-crash television?

Home Hanif Kureishi Something to Tell You. Home. Something to tell you, . What do they call it, car-crash television? You know what he said the other day?

I went down to the crossroads, Fell down on my knees. With his arms full of books, Bosnian novelists, the notebooks of Polish theatre directors, American poets and newspapers bought on Holland Park Avenue-Le Monde, Corriere della Sera, El País-he was returning to his flat by the river. Carrying his own atmosphere with him, Henry swung around the neighbourhood like it was a village-he was brought up in a Suffolk hamlet-continually calling out across the street to someone or other and, frequently, joining them for talk about politics and art.

Hanif Kureishi's Something to Tell You, about a Freudian analyst struggling with a guilty secret, sees him back at his very best, says Adam Mars-Jones. True tales from the couch. Hanif Kureishi's Something to Tell You, about a Freudian analyst struggling with a guilty secret, sees him back at his very best, says Adam Mars-Jones. Sat 23 Feb 2008 1. 3 EST First published on Sat 23 Feb 2008 1. 3 EST.

Something to Tell You: . .has been added to your Cart. Jamal Khan, the narrator of Hanif Kureishi's outrageously wonderful latest novel SOMETHING TO TELL YOU is one of the most unusual protagonists you are likely to meet

Something to Tell You: . Jamal Khan, the narrator of Hanif Kureishi's outrageously wonderful latest novel SOMETHING TO TELL YOU is one of the most unusual protagonists you are likely to meet. Middle-aged with an expanding midriff, he is a psychoanalyst fond of quoting Freud, Dante, Proust, Faulkner, Updike, et al. with never enough money to support his estranged wife Josephine, his beloved twelve-year-old son Rafi or his own spending habits as he wears green Paul Smith loafers, among other luxuries.

I am telling you I am dying of cancer and my career is a disaster. She will come to me later whispering, fearfully, Is he really dying of cancer? Not that I know. Is his career a disaster?

I went down to the crossroads, Fell down on my knees. Part one. Chapter one. Secrets are my currency: I deal in them for a living. I am telling you I am dying of cancer and my career is a disaster. Is his career a disaster? There are few people more eminent. Why does he say such things? What strange people they are, artists! )

Something to Tell You book.

Something to Tell You book. Also because his name crops up pretty regularly in discussions of Pakistani literature, so I was already halfway through his book when I realized he was British.

Something to Tell You. Annotation. Author: Hanif Kureishi. Jamal is a successful psychoanalyst haunted by his first love and a brutal act of violence from which he can never escape

Something to Tell You. Jamal is a successful psychoanalyst haunted by his first love and a brutal act of violence from which he can never escape. Looking back to his coming of age in the 1970s forms a vivid backdrop to the drama that develops thirty years later, as he and his friends face an encroaching middle age with the traumas of their youth still unresolved. Like The Buddha of Suburbia, Something to Tell You is full-to-bursting with energy, at times comic, at times painfully tender.

I’d never seen her in such a state. Ajita and I were putting our towels out, scanning the sky for clouds, when she broke down, weeping hard. s was bothering her. Her father was having trouble at his factory, the place he wanted her to run with him when she graduated. She had even hypothesised about whether she and I might manage it together, when her father retired. There had been a television documentary about the factory, which as it happened, I had watched with Mum, not realising it was about her family.

Like The Buddha of Suburbia, Something to Tell You is full-to-bursting with energy, at times comic, at times painfully tender. With unfailing deftness of touch Kureishi has created a memorable cast of recognisable individuals, all of whom wrestle with their own limits as human beings, haunted by the past until they find it within themselves to forgive. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Hanif Kureishi speaking in the Michael C. Carlos Museum at Emory University on 8.It was controversial for its explicit sex scenes. A novel entitled Something to Tell You was published in 2008

Hanif Kureishi speaking in the Michael C. Carlos Museum at Emory University on 8 September 2008. 1954-12-05) 5 December 1954 (age 65) Bromley, South London, England. The book was translated into Persian by Niki Karimi in 2005. Kureishi's drama The Mother was adapted to a movie by Roger Michell, which won a joint First Prize in the Director’s Fortnight section at Cannes Film Festival. A novel entitled Something to Tell You was published in 2008. His 1995 novel The Black Album, adapted for the theatre, was performed at the National Theatre in July and August 2009.

A wonderfully colourful, warm and epic novel of London life, love, sex and regret from one of Britain's greatest contemporary writers. Jamal is a successful psychoanalyst haunted by his first love and a brutal act of violence from which he can never escape. Looking back to his coming of age in the 1970s forms a vivid backdrop to the drama that develops thirty years later, as he and his friends face an encroaching middle age with the traumas of their youth still unresolved. Like The Buddha of Suburbia, Something to Tell You is full-to-bursting with energy as the characters struggle with their desires. At times comic, at times painfully tender, the book explores the relationships between men and women, parents and children. With unfailing deftness of touch Kureishi has created a memorable cast of recognisable individuals, all of whom wrestle with their own limits as human being, haunted by the past until they find it within themselves to forgive.
Fountain_tenderness
Jamal Khan, the narrator of Hanif Kureishi's outrageously wonderful latest novel SOMETHING TO TELL YOU is one of the most unusual protagonists you are likely to meet. Middle-aged with an expanding midriff, he is a psychoanalyst fond of quoting Freud, Dante, Proust, Faulkner, Updike, et al. with never enough money to support his estranged wife Josephine, his beloved twelve-year-old son Rafi or his own spending habits as he wears green Paul Smith loafers, among other luxuries. The son of a Pakistani father and English mother, he is haunted by his first love, a beautiful Indian woman, and at the same time guilt-ridden because of an unconfessed crime. It is no accident that he refers often to Dostoyevsky's Raskolnikov.

Jamal is surrounded by a cast of characters that Kureishi draws with a myriad of details so that they come alive as complex human beings on every page. His sister Miriam, whose face is covered with what the writer calls "nuts and bolts" and whose body is full of tattoos, is a Muslim single mother of either five children by three different men or three children by five men-- Jamal cannot remember. Her new lover Henry is a theatre and film director and her brother's best friend. He is separated from his wife Valerie; their two children are Lisa, a social worker who eschews the material, having once lived in a tree and having thrown paint at McDonald's and, according to one character, probably has dirt between her toes; and Sam who is outraged when he catches his father and Miriam engaged in S/M sex. The beautiful Indian woman is Ajita, who harbors her own dark secret; her brother is Mustag who becomes a popular singer; their father is the owner of a factory in London. There are at least a half dozen more characters just as interesting in this almost four-hundred-page novel that teems with life. London, from the 1970's to the present, particularly the area around West London, becomes a character in itself. Mick Jagger even makes an appearance.

Although there is a lot of sex here in at times a most comical story-- about any variety you can think of from sex clubs, houses of prostitution, orgies, male-female sex, male-male, female-female, you name it-- this novel ultimately is about things most serious: the cancerous effect of guilt, missed opportunities, the dynamics between parents and children, racial prejudice, extremism from both the left and right, the consequences of terrorism,but also hope and the wonder of love and its longevity. Jamal on the subject: "I am not, I feel certain, finished with love, either in its benign or its disorderly form, nor it with me."

Kureishi writes beautifully with such phrases as a "stoned Lady Bracknell," a "Gioconda smile," a "springy Salome," and "the latest supermodel of hysteria [as in Freud], Princess Diana." One of the passages that rises to poetry is Jamal's description of his love for his son: "When he was little, I kissed Rafi continuously, licked his stomach, stuck my tongue in his ear, tickled him, squeezed him until he gasped, laughing at his beard of saliva, his bib looking like an Elizabethan ruff. I loved the intimacy: the boy's wet mouth, the smell of his hair, as I'd loved those of various women."

Finally SOMETHING TO TELL YOU is one fantastic story that you will race through; if there is any justice, it certainly will make the next Booker Prize list.
Whitestone
At first I got a little caught up in the Indian subcontinent kitch of the work ... but soon I could see the genius of how Kureishi is able to get inside of the lives of people who just love to live on the other side of the edge, if you will. He told us in his title that he had something to tell us ... and you'd better believe it he had something worthwhile to convey to us :-)

Don't miss it !!
Iseared
not many other than psychoanalysts can write such a novel. shows they too can lead complicated lives filled with regrets, tragedies, but with a perspective born of the ability to reflect.
Mr_Mole
Jamal Khan, the central figure and narrator, of Hanif Kureishi's colorful and highly literate new novel, "Something to Tell You," leads a cast of the most interesting, if neurotic, self-indulgent, self-pitying characters in recent serious fiction.

The novel is based on the recollections of the middle-aged Khan, an Anglo-Indian psychoanalyst, of his life as a quiet, rather confused son of an Indian Muslim father and middle-class English mother and the brother of a neo-hippy, earth-mother sister. He eventually finds professional solace and success as a shrink to some of London's most prominent and least prominent mentally-challenged citizens. While his professional life is stellar, Dr. Khan's personal life has frequently been a sex-driven shambles.

Largely driven by a "busy Id", he seriously louses up the great passion of his life and eventually loses a wife that he once was obsessed with. His one constant, unwavering love is the one that he jealously guards for his twelve-year old son, Rafi.

The story is ultimately an agonizing--for the protagonist, Khan--attempt to find some balance between sex and love in a life littered with obsessions, dysfunctional family relationships, professional success and A-list recognition, and personal failure. This is equally the story of arrested-development, excess and lack of personal restraint. Not surprisingly, these are exactly the qualities that make this novel wildly interesting, hilarious and even lovable. Reading the book is roughly akin to watching several simultaneous trainwrecks in progress at different times stretching from the early 1960s to 2005 when major-league terrorism visited Britiain again.

This is a great read, with wonderful use of language, marvelous characters and non-linear story-telling.
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