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eBook Desolation Island (Windsor Selection) ePub

by PATRICK O'BRIAN

eBook Desolation Island (Windsor Selection) ePub
Author: PATRICK O'BRIAN
Language: English
ISBN: 0754015440
ISBN13: 978-0754015444
Publisher: CHIVERS LARGE PRINT (CHIVERS,; Large Print Ed edition (2001)
Pages: 526
Category: Genre Fiction
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 912
Formats: lrf lrf lit doc
ePub file: 1670 kb
Fb2 file: 1640 kb

Patrick O'Brian is the author of the acclaimed Aubrey-Maturin tales and the biographer of Joseph Banks and Picasso. His first novel, Testimonies, and his Collected Short Stories have recently been reprinted by HarperCollins.

Patrick O'Brian is the author of the acclaimed Aubrey-Maturin tales and the biographer of Joseph Banks and Picasso. He translated many works from French into English, among the novels and memoirs of Simone de Beauvoir and the first volume of Jean Lacouture's biography of Charles de Gaulle.

Home Patrick O'Brian Desolation Island. Desolation island, . They contained an extraordinary amount of Hollands gin, a very few books and instruments-cheap, dirty instruments, with rust and old blood still coating the whole length of the large saw-and the Home Office collection of drugs, by no means the same as those supplied to men-of-war by the Sick and Hurt Board. Deep in toast and marmalade, he demolished Mellowes root and branch; and noticing the indignation with which his hand had underlined the whole claptrap peroration, he observed, 'I am not dead.

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. paperback, new In stock shipped from our UK warehouse. That five books in to the series an author can still suprise and create a world with such detail and specificity and can still develop characters without becoming cliched or worn continues to impress me. The series is occupying most of my spare time, such is the way in which my imagination has been captured by O'Brian's writing. The series gets my highest recommendations.

Find nearly any book by Patrick O'brian (page 9). Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. The Far Side of the World. ISBN 9780001054981 (978-0-00-105498-1) Harpercollins Pub Ltd, 2003.

Desolation Island is the fifth historical novel in the Aubrey-Maturin series by Patrick O'Brian. It was first published in 1978. Jack Aubrey is in funds from his successful mission to take the islands of Mauritius and Reunion. His house has additions, but he is ready for another voyage. The story includes a voyage meant to reach Australia, and occurs prior to the War of 1812.

Patrick O'Brian, Desolation Island. I'm only five books into this series, but I must declare that I love these books like I love ice water on the beach, or hot chocolate with a warm blanket on a Fall night. Rarely do I find a writer that amazes and seduces me with his/her technical skill, prose, poetry, and sense of humanity. Patrick O'Brian, Desolation Island. I'm only five books into.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. BBC Radio Drama, Classic Serial, Historical Drama.

Patrick O'brian le eyes, fixed upon.

Patrick O'brian le eyes, fixed upon him in a cold, inimical stare, he feigned interest in a passing tilbury, calling out to its driver 'that the knacker's yard. Was only a quarter of a mile along the road, first turning on the left, if he wanted to get rid of his cattle'

Desolation Island is the 5th book in the Aubrey-Maturin series.

Desolation Island is the 5th book in the Aubrey-Maturin series. The book begins in Ashgrove cottage, where Captain Jack Aubrey has just purchased a racing horse and invested in a mining operation; he is awaiting his next commission. It is soon reveled that he will be taking command of the HMS Leopard, a ship that is currently being refitted

JoJoshura
_Desolation Island_ begins with a picture of domestic bliss: Aubrey at home with wife and children, waiting orders, and a little bewildered at how to fill the role of husband and father (to which is totally unaccustomed) rather than as captain and commander. From personal experience, such adjustment is at best difficult; then, as now, sharing a life at sea with a family can be a cause of friction, resentment and strife (I suspect this is the reason the sea services have such a high rate of divorce.) While awaiting orders, the newspapers are full of the story of Cpt. Bligh and the mutiny on his ship, The Bounty. Given the title, I anticipated Aubrey would face a similar fate once underway. I won't go further, for fear of spoilers.

Once orders are in hand, Aubrey's new command is almost immediately fraught with troubles: the ship has to take on a compliment of convicts bound for Australia, as well as several women - both are sure sources of conflict on such a long voyage. Underway, problems multiply as the ship is soon beset with disease, chased by a Dutch warship 1/3 again the size of Aubrey's, and his ship is beaten and battered by storms and severely damaged by icebergs.

I was initially attracted to the O'Brian series through his almost obsessive detail to life under sail and the vivid writing of naval warfare. Soon, however, I was pulled in by the growth of his characters and the depths of the bonds between Aubrey and Maturin. O'Brian again impresses, this time with the description of daily life at sea (which one would normally imagine to be one of monotony, but somehow here is both romantic and engaging) and the development of Maturin, both as intelligence officer as well as naturalist. The creative ways in which Aubrey addresses and resolves the myriad of problems he is best with also kept me in rapt attention. Further, O'Brian also shows another aspect of life in the Royal Navy at the dawn of the 19th century: that of floating diplomat, Cpt. Aubrey walking a fine line as he negotiates and works with the crew of an American whaler, precisely at a time when tensions between Britain and America are particularly frayed, relations simmering just prior to the War of 1812.

That five books in to the series an author can still suprise and create a world with such detail and specificity and can still develop characters without becoming cliched or worn continues to impress me. The series is occupying most of my spare time, such is the way in which my imagination has been captured by O'Brian's writing. The series gets my highest recommendations.
Perdana
In this installment, which reads more like one long novel rather than a serial, we find our heroes at sea again this time in " The Horrible Old Leopard", who we saw briefly in the last installment, an old ship, slow and with a somewhat tarnished reputation. The first order of business is to ferry convicts to New Holland and Botany bay for exile, naturally plague breaks out and the ships ranks are decimated, to make matters worse harsh weather and a collision with an iceberg leave the Leopard damaged and sinking. there is a wonderful portion of the novel where the leopard is under repair and Dr. Maturin is able to drop the facade he carries as an intelligence agent and and we get to see his true face, that of a naturalist and an explorer.

In this novel we also meet the mysterious Louisa Wogan, who has loose ties to Diana Villiers from previous novels and may be a either a spy or a wrongly convicted woman on her way to Botany Bay. she will play heavily in the future of this series.

This chapter of the saga has less action but in exchange we delve deeply into the intrigue of spies.

I highly recommend this novel for anyone who is a fan or who like historical fiction.
Bludsong
I'm currently reading -with great enjoyment- "The Nutmeg of Consolation", but when ordering the next three volumes in the series (taken from the flyleaf), I noticed "Desolation Island" and remembered that I'd intended to write a review of it. Frankly, I put it off because after finishing it my hands were too unsteady to type reliably.

Patrick O'Brian writes to satisfy almost any taste among those willing to undertake a built-in short course in 18th century phrasing and elegant style, but I've often read here that those who expect non-stop action from the Age of Sail will be disappointed in this series. I suppose there's an element of truth to that, but "Desolation Island" fills that void for those who need it, and particularly for the sailors among us.

Mr. O'Brian leaves nothing to chance in the world of nautical lore, and all of his books are filled with the kind of marine knowledge and terminology that will make any sailor smile -particularly the antiquarians- but "Desolation Island" takes things to a new level. In this book, Captain Aubrey commands "the horrible old Leopard", the same HMS Leopard of the Leopard-Chesapeake Affair that nearly touched off the American War of 1812 before its time, but with another Captain in charge, of course.

The sequence of events in the book leads to a masterfully woven tale of cat-and-mouse and eventual confrontation between HMS Leopard and a much more powerful Dutch 74, the Waakzamheid. I won't reveal how that turns out, but I will say that the pursuit of the Leopard by the Waakzamheid through and below the "Roaring 40s" is far and away the most spine-tingling, nail-biting, hair-raising (I've run out of hyphenated horrors) episode I've ever read from the Age of Sail. I suspect that any sailor who's ever been "caught out" in a Force 12 gale with mountainous following seas, cross seas and rogue waves will feel the need of a very, very strong "toddy" to calm the trembles after reading it. Non-drinkers will probably have to settle for a Valium.

Other events in this excellent book make it one of the most thrilling in the Aubrey/Maturin series, but sailors will likely enjoy it even more than most. That is, if stark terror amounts to a form of enjoyment. There. I finished this review without breaking into a cold sweat... again. A great read!
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