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eBook Hannibal ePub

by Ross Leckie

eBook Hannibal ePub
Author: Ross Leckie
Language: English
ISBN: 0862415446
ISBN13: 978-0862415440
Publisher: Canongate Books Ltd; First Edition edition (October 1, 1995)
Pages: 256
Category: Genre Fiction
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 517
Formats: docx azw doc rtf
ePub file: 1136 kb
Fb2 file: 1579 kb

Since reading Classics at Oxford, Ross Leckie has worked variously as a farm labourer, roughneck, schoolmaster, and insurance broker. He is best known for his Carthage trilogy.

A battle is like lust. Since reading Classics at Oxford, Ross Leckie has worked variously as a farm labourer, roughneck, schoolmaster, and insurance broker. He is now a full time writer living in Edinburgh. Other books in the series. The Carthage Trilogy (3 books).

Hannibal is a 1995 historical novel by Scottish writer Ross Leckie. The book relates the exploits of Hannibal's invasion of Rome beginning in 218 BC, narrated by the Carthaginian general in his retirement. It was the first of the Carthage trilogy, covering the Punic Wars.

The war fought by the Carthaginians under Hannibal against the Romans was the most memorable of all wars ever waged. Livy, Ab Urbe Condita, XXI. 1.

Ross Leckie, on Hannibal's horse "I ran through the Peri Hippikes, as Xenophon advises, starting at the feet. It's a bit of an odd book in its flow. It starts off well enough, Hannibal's childhood and his growth into adulthood are written convincingly. The horns of Peritan's hooves were deep before and behind. He stamped, just missing the groom's foot, and his hooves made a ringing sound like a cymbal. his neck arched, as Xenophon has it, like a gamecocks. But then something goes astray, it's as if the writer had lost some interest in the topic, or simply grew to dislike hannibal's character as the book progressed and took it out on him.

In Ross Leckie’s unforgettable re-creation of the Punic wars, it is Hannibal, the Carthaginian general, who narrates the story, and who is carried by his all-consuming ambition through profoundly bloody battles against the great Roman armies of early empire. In this breathtaking chronicle of love and hate, heroism and cruelty, one of humanity's greatest adventurers is brought to life, who learns through suffering that man is but a shadow of a dream.

I fought the Romans once. It no longer seems a prudent thing to do. Carthage concludes the internationally acclaimed trilogy that began with Hannibal and continued with Scipio. Here, Ross Leckie tells of the final Punic War: the story of a great city and a people's utter eradication under the relentless rise of Rome. But its chief characters, one the bastard son of Hannibal, the other of Scipio, would have wished it otherwise

Электронная книга "Hannibal", Ross Leckie. Ross Leckie is the author of the trilogy of historical novels, Hannibal, Scipio and Carthage, and of Aristotle's Alchemy. He lives in Edinburgh.

Электронная книга "Hannibal", Ross Leckie. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Hannibal" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Hannibal is an epic vision of one of history's greatest adventurers, the almost mythical man who most famously led his soldiers on elephants over the Alps. In Ross Leckie's unforgettable re-creation of the Punic wars, it is Hannibal, the Carthaginian general, who narrates the story, and who is carried by his all-consuming ambition through profoundly bloody battles against the great Roman armies of early empire.

Hannibal Ross Leckie. 4 people like this topic. Want to like this page?

Used availability for Ross Leckie's Hannibal.

Used availability for Ross Leckie's Hannibal. January 1996 : USA Hardback.

Written from Hannibal's perspective, this novel charts the rise and fall of the Carthaginian general who came so close to bringing down Rome. Ross Leckie is the author of "Bluff Your Way in the Classics", "Grampian, A Country in Miniature" and "The Gourmet's Companion".
Brick my own
I was looking forward to this book, but amazed to discover how many scenes were heavily derived (phrase by phrase in some scenes) from Mary Renault's great book, "Fire from Heaven" about the Life of Alexander. I found it very dissappointing that an author could reproduce an original so closely, with so little value added. I cite only one example: Mary Renault, on Alexander's horse Bucephalos "He was indeed, at all points, the ideal horse of Xenophon. Starting, as he advises, with the feet, one saw that the horns of the hooves were deep before and behind; when he stamped, as he was doing now (just missing the groom's foot), they made a ringing sound like a cymbal ... his neck arched, as the writer puts it, like a gamecock's .." Ross Leckie, on Hannibal's horse "I ran through the Peri Hippikes, as Xenophon advises, starting at the feet. The horns of Peritan's hooves were deep before and behind. He stamped, just missing the groom's foot, and his hooves made a ringing sound like a cymbal ... his neck arched, as Xenophon has it, like a gamecocks ...
A creative schoolchild writing an essay from the encyclopedia can paraphrase as well. Need I say more?
Braendo
GREAT INFO ON A GREAT SUBJECT.
Saimath
If you are interested in ancient empires and appreciate good writing, this is it. Compelling and of great interest. What a character. And quite a contrast to Scipio Africanus (the first of this trilogy for me).
Huston
excellent, book in very good condition as promised
Ishnllador
It's a bit of an odd book in its flow. It starts off well enough, Hannibal's childhood and his growth into adulthood are written convincingly. But then something goes astray, it's as if the writer had lost some interest in the topic, or simply grew to dislike hannibal's character as the book progressed and took it out on him.

Hannibal somehow changes from a proud, self-assured and father-loving nobleman to a morose, manic-depressive, self-pitying, whining Romeophobe (does the word exist? :) and loses all depth as a character. At some point in the book, you're just like "put that dagger through your throat already, for heaven's sake!".

And that's just the book as far as engaging prose goes. As far as accuracy goes... Well, the historians are still debating quite a bit of this stuff, since the Romans did a thorough job getting even and erasing Carthage's side of the story, so historians only have the Roman records to go by (which will of course be biased), and excavations of the leftovers. I somehow have a bit of a hard time envisioniing Hannibal as quite as shallow as the book portrays him, kinda running out of motivation and desire while in Italy and just hanging out. The reasons must have been different. I can't help but feel Leckie should have taken more creative freedom when it came to that side of the Hannibal story. No one knows anyhow. The Leckie story of someone like Hannibal being destroyed by his wife's death (and rape) and going downhill from there... I don't know. At least it didn't convince me - if it'd been that I'd assume he'd attacked Rome head-on for revenge, damn the consequences. If he'd been apathic and disinterested he'd let his generals march against it, too. Oh well, we will never know.

What we *do* know (at least I have read it repeatedly) is that Hamilcar drowned crossing a river after a battle - he didn't die in combat for all I know.
Mala
The great Carthaginian general Hannibal committed suicide by taking poison; he hoped to give the Romans "what they have long desired, the death of an old man." Not to mention the worst enemy they'd encountered since the founding of their city, a man who so terrified the people of Rome that mothers scolded their little children into obedience with the words, "Hannibal is at the gates!"
Pick this book up and you will find nothing in it to evoke any of that terror.
Ross Leckie is a bad writer. I don't mean that he writes without regard for style or characterization, although that's true too. Leckie is an inaccurate writer, and while historical fiction is by its definition supposed to take liberties with the truth, it should at least stick to some basics. Or as the writer Harry Turtledove has said: Choose the lie you're going to tell, and then make your readers believe it.
It's impossible to believe when the style is reminiscent of some Cecil B. DeMille Biblical blockbuster, and the pages are riddled with outright thefts from other authors (yes, in Chapter 7, Leckie lifts whole an entire passage from Mary Renault's "Fire From Heaven," which made me laugh so hard at what publishers seem determined to miss in order to sell ANYTHING). And frankly, Leckie's Hannibal commits the cardinal sin: he is boring. I wouldn't follow this man across the street; Leckie expects us to believe that soldiers gave years of their lives to follow him over the Alps and into a foreign land with no support from the home base?
Find any other novel about Hannibal, and you will find something much more worthwhile than this. The National Enquirer on its worst day is more entertaining, and probably more accurate.
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