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eBook Holder of the World ePub

by Bharati Mukherjee

eBook Holder of the World ePub
Author: Bharati Mukherjee
Language: English
ISBN: 0517158329
ISBN13: 978-0517158326
Publisher: Random House Value Publishing (November 21, 1995)
Category: Genre Fiction
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 785
Formats: doc azw doc lrf
ePub file: 1792 kb
Fb2 file: 1736 kb

Bharati Mukherjee vividly creates a tale of relocation, the collision of values, transformation and the courage it takes to adapt to new cultures. reminiscent of the Movie Slum Dog Millionaire. Mind opening for American s to read.

Bharati Mukherjee vividly creates a tale of relocation, the collision of values, transformation and the courage it takes to adapt to new cultures. and collide - the Puritan American and the Mughal Indian. Hannah guides Beigh, who in turn steers the reader through the centuries to solve ancient mysteries.

The Holder of the World, (1993) is a novel by Bharati Mukherjee. It is a retelling of Nathaniel Hawthorne's 1850 novel The Scarlet Letter, placing the story in two centuries (17th and 20th). The novel involves time travel via virtual reality, locating itself in 20th century Boston, 17th century Colonial America, and 17th century India during the spread of the British East India Company. It also references Thomas Pynchon's novel, . .The Holder of the World by Bharati Mukherjee.

Once again, Bharati Mukherjee proves she is one of our foremost writers, with the literary muscles to weave both the .

Once again, Bharati Mukherjee proves she is one of our foremost writers, with the literary muscles to weave both the future and the past into a tale that is singularly intelligent and provocative. -AMY TAN. This is the remarkable story of Hannah Easton, a unique woman born in the American colonies in 1670, "a "An amazing literary feat and a masterpiece of storytelling.

Bharati Mukherjee constantly reminds us of the interconnections among cultures that have made our modern world. draws us with vigor and scrupulous attention to detail across time and space, into the footsteps of not one but two extraordinary women.

In 1988 Mukherjee won the National Book Critics Circle Award- for her collection The Middleman . The Holder of the World (1993). Nostalgia by Bharati Mukherjee. The Penguin Book of Modern Indian Short Stories. New Delhi, Middlesex, New York: Penguin Books, 1991: 28–40.

In 1988 Mukherjee won the National Book Critics Circle Award- for her collection The Middleman and Other Stories Mukherjee died due to complications of rheumatoid arthritis and takotsubo cardiomyopathy on January 28, 2017 in Manhattan at the age of 76. She was survived by her husband and so. Leave It to Me (1997).

The Holder of the World. An amazing literary feat and a masterpiece of storytelling. Bharati Mukherjee's work illuminates a new world of people in migration that has transformed the meaning of "America. Once again, Bharati Mukherjee prove she is one of our foremost writers, with the literary muscles to weave both the future and the past into a tale that is singularly intelligent and provocative. An aristocratic Filipina negotiates a new life for herself with an Atlanta investment banker.

Once again, Bharati Mukherjee proveshe is one of our foremost writers, with the literary muscles t.Yet that is exactly what Bharati Mukherjee has done in The Holder of the World

Once again, Bharati Mukherjee proveshe is one of our foremost writers, with the literary muscles t.Yet that is exactly what Bharati Mukherjee has done in The Holder of the World. In doing so, she manages to create a true literary bridge between East and West, reaching so far back to the roots of our respective cultures and thinking that for the first time in the dozen or so novels I've read by Indian authors, I feel as if I'm beginning to understand how and why we and they became who we.

In her luminous new novel, Bharati Mukherjee creates a vivid, complex tale about the dislocation and transformation .

In her luminous new novel, Bharati Mukherjee creates a vivid, complex tale about the dislocation and transformation that arise in the face of a meeting of cultures: the terrain she has so brilliantly made her own in her acclaimed novels and stories. Here, in The Holder of the World, we witness an unlikely and intriguing meeting of two worlds, the Puritan American and the Mughal Indian. In a startling commingling of history and imagination, Mukherjee lights up the making and very nature of the American consciousness

The master was drinking heavily, he had grown careless and abusive, and now he was at sea in a dangerous season, in a bad temper. The dream was about Gabriel.

The master was drinking heavily, he had grown careless and abusive, and now he was at sea in a dangerous season, in a bad temper. d be back home again. She had seen him in a masoola boat heavy with chests. There hadn’t been room in the boat for sailors. Not even for the Marquis. But she had also dreamed of corpses. Bodies bobbed like gulls on the waves. The bodies, impaled by Mughals’ spears, shriveled like fallen fruit in the forest. One last time, she begged

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"An amazing literary feat and a masterpiece of storytelling. Once again, Bharati Mukherjee proveshe is one of our foremost writers, with the literary muscles to weave both the future and the past into a tale that is singularly intelligent and provocative."--AMY TANThis is the remarkable story of Hannah Easton, a unique woman born in the American colonies in 1670, "a person undreamed of in Puritan society." Inquisitive, vital and awake to her own possibilities, Hannah travels to Mughal, India, with her husband, and English trader. There, she sets her own course, "translating" herself into the Salem Bibi, the white lover of a Hindu raja.It is also the story of Beigh Masters, born in New England in the mid-twentieth century, an "asset hunter" who stumbles on the scattered record of her distant relative's life while tracking a legendary diamond. As Beigh pieces together details of Hannah's journeys, she finds herself drawn into the most intimate and spellbinding fabric of that remote life, confirming her belief that with "sufficient passion and intelligence, we can decontrsuct the barriers of time and geography...."From the Trade Paperback edition.
Anararius
Bharati Mukherjee's "The Holder of the World: A Novel," deals with transitions in geographical and cultural space - from America to England to India, and the personal transformations a young woman experiences as a result. This is also a novel which moves unobtrusively through time and space, between the 20th century and the 17th, with barely a ripple, shifting beautifully between geographical locations, history and human relationships. Ms. Mukherjee interweaves here the story of a 20th century New England researcher with that of her ancestor, a Puritan woman, who roamed from the New World to India.

Beigh Masters is a woman who "lives in three time zones simultaneously." Not Eastern, Central and Pacific Time, but "the past, the present and the future." Her Yale thesis on the Puritans led her to graduate school, and to a figure from the distant past, an ancestor, actually. At grad school she met and began her life with her lover, Venn Iyer. She also began her career as an "asset-hunter," a detective of sorts, who seeks out antiques and other priceless items for wealthy clients. Venn, born and raised in India, and a graduate of MIT, "animates information." He and his team are somehow recreating the universe by the mass ingestion of the entire world's information: newspapers, records and documents, telephone directories, satellite passes, every TV and radio show aired, political debate, airline schedule - well, just about every piece of information ever recorded. When the grid, the base, is complete, they hope to insert a person into time and space through this careful reconstruction of the past by the meticulous build-up of data.

Beigh has a client who hired her to track down the most perfect diamond in the world - "The Emperor's Tear." She has also been searching for a woman, known as Salem Bibi, who lived over 300 years ago. Beigh knows more about Hannah Easton, called Salem Bibi, than perhaps anyone who ever lived, and through her knowledge of this woman, she comes closer to finding the Emperor's Tear." Hannah, born into Puritan society in Massachusetts in 1670, orphaned at an early age because of fierce Indian attacks on her settlement, married an English trader/adventurer/pirate. She traveled with him to England, and then to Mughal India, at the time of the establishment of the British East India Company. There Hannah became the lover of a Hindu raja and took-on the name Salem Bibi. She is the last known person to have seen and held the "Emperor's Tear." She is also an ancestor of Beigh Masters.'

"The Holder of the World" is both Hannah's and Beigh's story. And they are both remarkable women. Hannah lived centuries ahead of her time. She was born into the restricted Puritan world, in a new country with few amenities and much hardship. The New World was a dangerous and alien environment where women knew their place. Hannah, however, was an inquisitive, lively, vital woman, with a knowledge of self and a sense of purpose. She perhaps inherited her spirited nature from her mother, a woman whose terrible secret Hannah kept all her life.

This is a beautifully written, complex novel of history, ideas and adventure. Bharati Mukherjee vividly creates a tale of relocation, the collision of values, transformation and the courage it takes to adapt to new cultures. And here two worlds do meet...and collide - the Puritan American and the Mughal Indian. Hannah guides Beigh, who in turn steers the reader through the centuries to solve ancient mysteries. I would have liked to have felt closer to Hannah. However, the author always seems to keep her at a distance, as a historic figure. I do recommend this novel as it is unusual and makes for excellent reading.

JANA
Runehammer
This novel was first described to me as a rewrite of Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, so I was a little surprised when I read Mukherjee's book. It is not simply another version of Hawthorne's work, but rather a complex story that combines elements of history, romance, time-travel, mystery, and adventure. Though it was not exactly what I expected, I thoroughly enjoyed The Holder of the World. The large cast of characters and the intertwined plots were at times a bit confusing, but the central story of Hannah was fascinating. In addition to constructing an interesting narrative that takes place on three different continents in two different periods of history, Mukherjee skillfully leads the reader to question what we consider to be the canon of literature and the "Truth" of history. She achieves the latter in part by convincingly citing various primary sources, some of which do exist and others that don't. I found some of the most intriguing characters to be on the margins of Mukherjee's narrative-Hannah's mother Rebecca, Henry Hedges, and the Marquis de Mussy, to name a few. The Holder of the World also shows many connections between the New World of America and the Old World of India, something not traditionally thought of in conjunction with colonial North America. I especially appreciated the way Mukherjee associated Asian Indian influence with American Indian influence on the colonies and showed both to be much more important than we might assume. I highly recommend this book, but also offer one piece of advice: to enjoy this book, read it slowly and thoroughly. If you skim it, then the plot will only be confusing.
Mozel
If you like prose, you will like this book. I have read a lot of books, I feel that I am fairly well versed in english, however I found myself checking out the dictionary several times with this book. The writing is very descriptive, not so much to give you a clear picture of what the author is describing, but to use descriptions to display the author's skills with words. With the meandering with language I forgot that the author was telling a story. This is to be put squarely in the literature shelf. I did not find it pleasurable reading. This is just my opinion however, everyone is entitled to that. All I know is that I have yet to complete the reading of this book, but I will eventually suffer through to the end.
The story centers around some kind of historian/artifact hunter, and her search for particular jewel, and her relationship with her boyfriend. There is suppose to be some parallel with her life story and the story of the woman she is researching, who just happen to be a distant ancestor. I find the main character unemotional, but as I said, have not reached the end yet. perhaps I will update this review later.
Rasmus
This is one of those books I recommend to people if they want a book that has EVERYthing. Romance, scientists, a historical mystery and detective chase, a prince and his mistress, culture clash, the search for freedom, and an amazing set of locales for contrast. You can't get any different from the palaces of India than 1700's Pilgrim America.

I can't describe how much I love this book. The ending is phenomenal, ingenious, genre bending stuff. Totally unexpected and deservedly earns to me the bestowed crown of reviews: one of the best endings of any book I have ever read. The prose is thick, it is not a quick read, but this is a detail oriented book. It is very smartly written, and I would recommend it to any professor looking for a great multicultural studies course novel. The romance of the book is sweeping but also restrained. Mukherjee is an expert at making us patiently wait for a deserved outcome. I can't say any more without giving too much away. Holder of the World is a huge accomplishment of a novel, it is something utterly unique in the number of directions it takes and the number of places we go in it makes us realize that love, however brief, is truly the greatest treasure.
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