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eBook What Did Miss Darrington See?: An Anthology of Feminist Supernatural Fiction ePub

by Jessica Amanda Salmonson,Rosemary Jackson

eBook What Did Miss Darrington See?: An Anthology of Feminist Supernatural Fiction ePub
Author: Jessica Amanda Salmonson,Rosemary Jackson
Language: English
ISBN: 1558610065
ISBN13: 978-1558610064
Publisher: The Feminist Press at CUNY; 1st edition (January 1, 1989)
Pages: 264
Category: Genre Fiction
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 437
Formats: doc mobi mbr docx
ePub file: 1775 kb
Fb2 file: 1323 kb

ISBN-13: 978-1558610064. Fans of supernatural fiction will find treat in What Did Miss Darrington See?" -Utne Reader. excellent theme anthology from the leading American publisher of historic women's writing. This book reminded me of the experience of sitting down with your best female friend and sharing wine with her and talking through the night about what your life has been like since you two parted. If you have ever sat down with a woman and had a long and very deep conversation with her them this is what the book will remind you of.

Salmonson, Jessica Amanda. New York : Feminist Press at the City University of New York : Distributed by the Talman Co. Fantasy literature, Horror tales, Supernatural, Feminism, Feminist fiction, Occult fiction, Roman fantastique, Récits d'horreur, Surnaturel, Roman féministe, Écrits de femmes. Collection. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana.

Jessica Amanda Salmonson; Rosemary Jackson. Whether writing about supernatural phenomena or applying the techniques of magic realism, allegory, and surrealism, the diverse talents represented in the 25 stories contained here focus on female characters and treat a variety of traditional themes in inventive and provocative ways. Winner of a 1989 Lambda Literary Award, this collection of twenty-four entertaining and haunting 19th-and 20th-century tales from the US, Britain, and Latin America reclaims a literary tradition that has long been overlooked.

A collection of feminist supernatural fiction published between 1850 and . When the guest sees the ghost of young lover killed by house founder’s husband, she learns what true love is.

A collection of feminist supernatural fiction published between 1850 and 1988. It’s a challenge not to be ahistorical in thinking about these, in terms of both feminism and where these stories fit in terms of genre.

Whether writing about supernatural phenomena or applying the techniques of magic realism, allegory, and surrealism, the diverse talents represented in the 25 stories contained here focus on female characters and treat a variety of traditional themes in inventive and provocative ways. Genre: Literary Fiction. Used availability for Jessica Amanda Salmonson's What Did Miss Darrington See?

An Anthology of Feminist Supernatural Fiction. What Did Miss Darrington See? (NY: The Feminist Press at CUNY, 1989). Wife or Spinster: Short Stories by 19th Century American Women (Maine: Yankee Books, 1991) with Charles Waugh.

An Anthology of Feminist Supernatural Fiction. This section may contain an excessive amount of intricate detail that may interest only a particular audience.

Two dozen tales, 1850-1988, offering supernatural variations by and about women who espouse a specifically feminist point of view: a refreshingly different approach, effective even when the ideas tend toward a certain sameness

Two dozen tales, 1850-1988, offering supernatural variations by and about women who espouse a specifically feminist point of view: a refreshingly different approach, effective even when the ideas tend toward a certain sameness. Thus, several of the variations here-the older ones in particular-concern women visited by the apparitions of dying or recently departed Friends, relatives, or (female) lovers.

Jessica Amanda Salmonson . Pointing out the paucity of stories by women in .

Pointing out the paucity of stories by women in . and Latin American stories spanning 1850 to 1988.

Using such techniques as magic realism, allegory, and surrealism, the authors re-imagine the cliches of supernatural fiction, focusing on female characters and treating traditional themes in inventive and provocative ways. Among the authors included are Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Luisa Valenzuela, Leonora Carrington, Barbara Burford, and Joanna Russ.

Winner of a 1989 Lambda Literary Award, this collection of twenty-four entertaining and haunting 19th-and 20th-century tales from the US, Britain, and Latin America reclaims a literary tradition that has long been overlooked. Using such techniques as magic realism, allegory, and surrealism, the authors re-imagine the cliches of supernatural fiction, focusing on female characters and treating traditional themes in inventive and provocative ways. Among the authors included are Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Luisa Valenzuela, Leonora Carrington, Barbara Burford, and Joanna Russ.
Kegal
The variety of these stories and the level of artistry they represent is stunning. I was surprised, reading some of the oldest ones, at how contemporary the writing feels, even though they were written in the Victorian era. I was pleased to find how many ways there are to look at supernatural fiction, and how deftly and coherently these women handled their material. I had a wonderful time skipping back and forth through the years, discovering what other women writers have taken on. So glad I found this anthology!
Jairani
Firstly, I can not say enough about how good this book was.If you are a woman or even know a woman and are interested to know what her experiences are like to be a woman you can't go wrong with this book.
The stories were scary-some of them-but more important they really portrayed what it was like to be a woman 100 years ago to the present day.
This book reminded me of the experience of sitting down with your best female friend and sharing wine with her and talking through the night about what your life has been like since you two parted.
If you have ever sat down with a woman and had a long and very deep conversation with her them this is what the book will remind you of.
I loved this book and think it's one of the best collections of stories out there for woman or men who are sympathetic towards women and their issues.
One thing is not to read the whole introduction before you read the stories.I would not do this because it gives some of the specialness away.Read it after the stories.
Also, read them in order.There is a certain beauty in the way they are told in order.
I won't go into all the individual stories because I want them to be a surprise for you but some points to make a on the following:The title work is wonderful.Talk about a strong successful woman.She was someone who was NOT a victim spinsterhood.She chose her independence over love and marriage.Talk about a woman who created her own destiny that was not dependent on any man like so many woman were at the time.I fell in love with her.I am also sure that there were quite a few woman in 1870 who were like her but we don't hear about them.We hear about the 'uselessness' of a woman if she was not a wife and mother.That is something that I have seen over and over again in the male as well as the female writers of the period.A woman at the time only had worth if she was beautiful.She was an ornament to a man and that's all.
A Friend in Need is a story about a woman meeting her childhood invisible friend at the airport.Or is she?
Attachment was a terrifying story of the attachment between two women in different parts of the world and what happens when one is sick.
The Sixth Canvessar I found chilling.I still have a great fear of death and dying so watching this woman go through the horror of life right before death I found almost unreadable.
Tamar was wonderful.If you have ever rooted for the bag guy/gal then this is a story that you will love.I found my self rooting her on into the most vile things.But I could also see her as a victim of her times and station so I had great sympathy for her.
The Teacher is a horrifying tale built on the male view of woman as virtue and what happens when she is a normal,flesh woman and not this ideal that this poor, stupid man thought.

Three Dreams in the Desert just has to be read to be appreciated.
The Fall is a welcome sacrilegious story of the Virgin Mary and her escape of her role.I loved it even though it turned my stomach a little and I am not Christian.I thought that it was a brave and noble story.
The Doll is another chilling story about the ornamentation of a very young wife and the subsequent freeing of her from entrapment from a man.
I have to say that I found The Debutant a scream.I haven't laughed so hard in a long time.
Clay-shuttered Doors is again about a woman not allowed to die peacefully but kept alive by a man's selfishness.
And finally Since I Died is a beautiful story of love and loss.The tenderness that the one woman feels for the other made me cry.I deeply felt her loss of her loved one.
One of the other very good things about this but aside from the stories is the reading list in the back and also the little blurb about the author's before the start of their stories.
I think this is the longest review that I have ever wrote but thought that this book was worth the time and effort.I will be doing a lot of further reading by these author's in the future and I hope that when you read this book you will find it just as special as I did.
Braswyn
Students of English Literature often encounter works by women which are noted for their feminist views in exposing social conditions, abuses and wrongs. During the late 1800's and early 1900's, the Ghost Story became the perfect vehicle for such expressions of angst and this collection is one of the best. Some of the works survive only because of the diligence and dedication of feminist researchers and short story collectors, academics and critics. Historically relevant for students, scholars, the stories are marvelous on their own for mere fans of the genre, as any good ghost story should be.
JoJolar
I really wanted to love this anthology, ghost stories with a feminist view - what could be bad? - but I found it very disappointing. The stories are VERY uneven; there is really good stuff and some really crappy stuff as well. I realize that others disagree with me. ALERT: Lots of spoilers ahead.
The subtitle is "An Anthology of Feminist Supernatural Fiction". I consider this to be somewhat misleading as many of the stories aren't really supernatural or especially feminist either. I consider a tale labeled "supernatural" should contain a ghost. Or at the very least some type of (preferably malevolent) spiritual energy.
Stories I liked:
I really enjoyed "Dreaming the Sky Down", but I would consider it a fantasy. Good fantasy, mind you, but no ghosts.
"The Debutante" is a dark comic fantasy, but not what I think of as a supernatural tale either.
"Pandora Pandaemonia" is fantasy. Also very good.
"Clay-Shuttered Doors" is an old favorite of mine. It IS a supernatural story. It also has a feminist slant. Mary, the narrator, uncovers the rotting (in more ways than one) underpinnings of her friend Thalia's "perfect" life.
Luella Miller also qualifies as a supernatural story, but I don't really think of it as a feminist story. It's also not my favorite Wilkins Freeman; I prefer "The Wind in the Rose-Bush".
I also enjoyed the title story which meets (my) qualifications as a supernatural tale. However, I am puzzled as to how it is feminist. Miss Darrington did exactly what a conventional young woman of her class and upbringing would have done at that time. She became a governess/companion and then a teacher. She was competent/intelligent/lucky enough to be able to open her own school, but this was a perfectly respectable enterprise for a woman in her circumstances. What WOULD have been radical would have been for her to fall in love with and marry a man of inferior education, superior social class and of a different ethnicity. She is only able to admit her feelings for Raphael - even to herself - after he is dead. I really see her as upholding the status quo. However, I did like this story as well.
Lisa Tuttle's "A Friend in Need" very good also. It isn't frightening, but it has a nice twist at the end.
The Bad -
While some of the other stories are actual ghost sightings, many of them are just not very engaging.
And frankly, "An Unborn Visitant", "The Teacher" and "The Fall" don't really belong in this anthology. (I didn't care for them either.)
And everything I have ever read by Olive Schreiner just annoys me. Seriously.
I am hanging on to this for now and I will re-read some of it to see if it improves with longer acquaintance, but this was quite a disappointment for me.
Xwnaydan
If you enjoy boring, verbose, predictable victorian prattle look no further. These "stories" boast all of the charm of an unassembled cardboard box (non corrugated). Dull, mundane and exhausting. Enjoy.
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