lind-peinture
» » Sex Wars: A Novel of the Turbulent Post-Civil War Period

eBook Sex Wars: A Novel of the Turbulent Post-Civil War Period ePub

by Marge Piercy

eBook Sex Wars: A Novel of the Turbulent Post-Civil War Period ePub
Author: Marge Piercy
Language: English
ISBN: 0060789832
ISBN13: 978-0060789831
Publisher: William Morrow; First Edition edition (November 22, 2005)
Pages: 416
Category: Genre Fiction
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 869
Formats: mbr rtf docx lrf
ePub file: 1618 kb
Fb2 file: 1764 kb

Post-Civil War New York City was the battleground of the American dream: an era of vast fortunes and crushing poverty; a. .

Post-Civil War New York City was the battleground of the American dream: an era of vast fortunes and crushing poverty; a time notorious for free love and the emerging rights of women. The title Sex Wars sounds like Star Wars, and although Piercy's latest is set on Earth, it does illuminate a strange and treacherous world: the Gilded Age in New York City. Piercy's great theme is always the battle between the sexes and the hardships misogyny imposes on women. In this mesmerizing, sexy, and forthright historical novel, she portrays heroic women determined to control every aspect of their lives, from birth control to finances.

Post-–Civil War New York City is the battleground of the American dream. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Sex Wars: A Novel of the Turbulent Post-Civil War Period as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Post-Civil War New York City was the battleground of the American dream: an era of vast fortunes and crushing .

Post-Civil War New York City was the battleground of the American dream: an era of vast fortunes and crushing poverty; a time notorious for free love and the emerging rights of women, yet one that saw the rise of brutal sexual repression and the enforcement of prejudice. In the tradition of her World War II epic Gone to Soldiers, Marge Piercy re-creates a turbulent period in American history witnessed through the lives of its most notorious figures and explores the changing attitudes toward women, minorities, religion, and sexuality in nineteenth-century America, a land of sacrifice, suffering, promise, and reward.

Post–Civil War New York City is the battleground of the American dream. In this era of free love, emerging rights of women, and brutal sexual repression, Freydeh, a spirited young Jewish immigrant, toils at different jobs to earn passage to America for her family. In the tradition of her bestselling World War II epic Gone to Soldiers, Marge Piercy once again re-creates a turbulent period in American history and explores changing attitudes in a land of sacrifice, suffering, promise, and reward.

The survivors have written their own books. RUTHIE 5: Candles Burn Out. BERNICE 5: The Crooked Desires of the Heart Fulfilled. LOUISE 6: The End of a Condition Requiring Illusions. and those who perished are too many and too hungry. ABRA 6: Love’s Labor. DANIEL 5: Working in Darkness. MURRAY 2: A Little Miscalculation of the Tides. JEFF 6: A Leader of Men and a Would-be Leader of Women. NAOMI 6: A Few Words in the Mother Tongue. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

A Novel of the Turbulent Post-Civil War Period. VICTORIA WAS READING the enormous book their landlady on Greene Street kept in her parlor. Published November 22, 2005 by William Morrow. χετικά με τον συγγραφέα. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Marge Piercy was born in Detroit, Michigan, into a working-class family that had . Sex Wars: A Novel of the Turbulent Post-Civil War Period, William Morrow (New York, NY), 2005. The Cost of Lunch, Etc.

Marge Piercy was born in Detroit, Michigan, into a working-class family that had been hard-hit by the Depression. An extremely prolific writer, Piercy has published close to 20 books of poetry and close to 20 novels. Her novels generally address larger social concerns through sharply observed characters and brisk plot lines. PM Press, 2014.

Post-Civil War New York City was the battleground of the American dream: an era of vast fortunes and crushing poverty; a time notorious for free love and the emerging rights of women, yet one that saw the rise of brutal sexual repression and the enforcement of prejudice. Though life was hard, the promise of change was in the air. Women were agitating for civil rights, including the vote. Immigrants were pouring into the city, bringing with them a new energy.

Embodying the times is Freydeh, a spirited young Jewish woman from Russia. Living in a tiny tenement flat with eight others, Freydeh juggles numerous jobs to earn passage to New York for her beloved family. Then she learns that her younger sister is adrift somewhere in the city and begins a search that carries her through brothels and prison.

Interwoven with Freydeh's story is a vividly wrought account of such real-life heroines -- often at odds with the law as well as societal customs -- as Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Victoria Woodhull, the first woman to run for president and an activist for sexual freedom. They were tireless fighters who strove to elevate the position of all women. Depicted as well is the fundamentalist crusader Anthony Comstock, who fought to eliminate sexual expression, pushing for the passage of laws that still haunt our legal system.

In the tradition of her World War II epic Gone to Soldiers, Marge Piercy re-creates a turbulent period in American history witnessed through the lives of its most notorious figures and explores the changing attitudes toward women, minorities, religion, and sexuality in nineteenth-century America, a land of sacrifice, suffering, promise, and reward.

Adoranin
The more I read historical fiction the more convinced I am that the educational system in America is completely inadequate (and I went to a supposedly college prep school!) "Sex Wars" by Marge Percy is a particularly good example of that failure. There is so much in this novel about women's history that should not be forgotten-especially now. There is information in this book that should be taught to everyone so that we can keep from backsliding into a nation where once again women are treated as children, with no control over their own bodies, legal matters, property, freedom or children.

"Sex Wars" is really four stories is one, though they all intertwine and weave a larger message of the battle that women faced for equality in the last quarter of the 19th century. Though the back of the book claims that the novel mainly follows Freydeh, a young Jewish woman searching for her sister in New York City and along the way she meets some of the largest influences of the age, in reality it is divided up between her and three others. The first suffragettes Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, Victoria Woodhull sexual freethinker and the first woman to run for president, and Anthony Comstock founder of the society for the suppression of Vice; they all have a voice in this book.

In truth the novel does follow Freydeh as she searches for her sister, but also as she begins to adopt street children to care for and begins a burgeoning condom making business so that she can make enough money to feed, cloth and house herself and her adopted children, as well as sending money back to her home country for her family to immigrate on. But it also follows Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony as they fight with abolitionists to get equal time for their cause and with proper ladies who aren't ready to truly fight-not just talk politely- for equality. And Victoria Woodhull, who grew up in a family of con men but pulled herself out using her smarts and the conviction that she was meant to be a great leader some day but was constantly in scandal because of her family, belief in spiritualism and her practice of free love. And last but certainly not least is Anthony Comstock whose rampant censorship seems to be based on true fear of women and young people's corruption, which sees as leading to death.

Told in expansive, highly descriptive third person, this is a novel that truly is about the sex wars. Every person in this book is fighting in their way-sometimes simply by insisting on making a living independent of men-for equality or dominance. And not only are they fighting over the ideals of the day but against thousands of years of oppression and inequality. It's a mighty task.

This book was a revelation to me. It is crammed full of facts that they just don't teach you in school (such as: a married woman couldn't sign legal documents but a single one could, women could not testify in court because it was considered indecent, anatomical books were considered to be pornography) as well as the accounts of just some of the numerous men and women who worked their whole lives to create a better world where all are equal. In every way it is an inspiring book and I am glad to have read it.

However it's also a slow starter and a bit hard to get really absorbed in because of the constantly shifting perspective. For about the first one hundred seventy five pages I wasn't sure if this was a book I could finish, but after that it became impossible to put down.

This is a book everyone should read. If only to see how far we all have come in the last hundred and thirty years and what we could possibly loose.

Four point five stars. I look forward to reading more of this author's work!.
Fearlessdweller
In Sex Wars Marge Piercy takes on a historical era, as she did in City of Darkness, City of Light (the French Revolution). The time is post-Civil War up to 1915, the place, New York City, and three of the four main characters are real people--Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Victoria Woodhull, and Anthony Comstock. The fourth character, fictional, is Freydeh Levin, a Jewish-Russian immigrant from "The Pale." (Yes, that's the origin of the expression beyond The Pale.) In case you're wondering about the book's unfortunate title, Stanton and Woodhull were women's rights advocates working for female suffrage and Comstock was the head of the Society for the Suppression of Vice, a fanatical crusader who destroyed lives and livelihoods trashing bookstores, saloons, and even condom makers. The Comstock Laws are still on the books in New York.
Several other historical figures appear in Sex Wars: Madame Restell, New York's premier abortionist of the time, Cornelius Vanderbilt, Lucretia Mott, Harriet Beecher Stowe and her siblings--all drawn with meticulous accuracy. Several times I found myself propelled by curiosity to Wikipedia to see what was real and what was fictional, and found the stories hewing closely to truth. What Piercy makes up, of course, are interiors--people's thoughts, motivations and feelings as they live through history. Piercy is an avid researcher, and on her website she says she dug up too much information to include in the novel, so she's created a Power Point lecture available for group presentations.
In City of Darkness, City of Light the author took the same approach to the story of the French Revolution; and in previous books she often told the story from multiple points of view, most notably in Gone to Soldiers. While I loved both these novels, I was sometimes disappointed when the narrative switched point of view, as I preferred that of a different character. In Sex Wars however, this never happened: every character is as compelling as every other, so I was perfectly happy no matter whose voice predominated--proof that Piercy has attained mastery over this style of storytelling. Other writers who use it don't always carry it off; sometimes every character's voice is numbingly the same--whereas Piercy's characters are clearly identifiable.
The era portrayed here bears uncanny similarities to our own time, and Piercy says that's why she chose to explore it. The event that parallels to the present the most is the Presidential race in which Republican Rutherford B. Hayes stole the election from Democrat Samuel Tilden, with the help of several Supreme Court judges. This was one of those passages that had me scampering to Wikipedia; sure enough, Marge told it true. So how come we didn't hear about this during the hijacked election of 2000? Or did I alone miss it? I've missed so much, and haven't we all? Some of our woefully lacking education can be blamed on public school methods, with their relentless recitation of history as a series of wars and treaties, crap that bored the hell out of me so I tuned it out. Piercy, on the other hand, brings her story to these pages, including small and large details of domestic life: the food they cooked and how, the clothes they wore and the tools used to wash and iron them. These details not only fill a gap in American history, they add spark and color to the narrative.
On its website Harper Collins posts a Sex Wars "reading guide," of the kind fashionable in book groups today. One question asks readers their favorite character. My answer was, without hesitation, Victoria Woodhull. All I knew of this women's rights' advocate was her name. In Sex Wars I learned she was a sex radical who espoused some of the same beliefs as Carol Queen or Susie Bright; that she and her sister were the first female stockbrokers on Wall Street; and that she was the first woman to address Congress and the first woman to run for President--before women were even granted the vote. Several times in her life (yes, I checked) she was broke, financially and spiritually--once when Comstock threw her into prison for writing about sexual issues--but each time she recovered. As the Stanton character says near the end, "Victoria had been forced to retreat from her more radical positions because she actually lived them."
There are some flaws; too much is repetitive, and some characters seem exaggerated, particularly Comstock, who comes off like an extreme version of Jerry Falwell (then again, he probably was). As she gallops to a conclusion the writing is more like reportage than storytelling, and the end is a bit too neat, with each character's life summed up tidily. But such minor flaws are tolerable in an otherwise compelling page-turner. Another era beautifully Pierced! (I couldn't resist.)
lind-peinture.fr
© All right reserved. 2017-2020
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
eBooks are provided for reference only