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eBook Irish Novelists and the Victorian Age ePub

by James H. Murphy

eBook Irish Novelists and the Victorian Age ePub
Author: James H. Murphy
Language: English
ISBN: 0199596999
ISBN13: 978-0199596997
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (March 25, 2011)
Pages: 344
Category: History & Criticism
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 118
Formats: mbr lrf lit lrf
ePub file: 1980 kb
Fb2 file: 1345 kb

Murphy James H. (EN). This is the first comprehensive study of the Irish writers of the Victorian age, some of them still remembered, most of them now forgotten.

Murphy James H. Their work was often directed to a British as well as an Irish reading audience and was therefore disparaged in the era of . Yeats and the Irish Literary Revival with its culturally nationalist agenda

Murphy shows the ways in which Irish novelists contributed to this process and to what he terms the splintering of fiction in Ireland (288).

Murphy shows the ways in which Irish novelists contributed to this process and to what he terms the splintering of fiction in Ireland (288). A final chapter provides a series of snapshots of literary lives that reveal that many Irish novelists of the period were dependent on the financial support of the Royal Literary Fund or on the British civil list

This is the first comprehensive study of the Irish writers of the Victorian age, some of them still remembered, most of. .

This is the first comprehensive study of the Irish writers of the Victorian age, some of them still remembered, most of them now forgotten. Yeats and the Irish Literary Revival with its culturally nationalist agenda. Finally, the book engages with the critical debate of recent times concerning the supposed failure of realism in the nineteenth-century Irish novel, looking for more specific causes than have hitherto been offered and discovering occasions on which realism turned out to be possible.

This is the first comprehensive study of the neglected Irish writers of the Victorian age, whose work was highly popular with the British reading audience and therefore disparaged and largely forgotten from the era of .

In the Victorian age there were hundreds of Irish authors who wrote thousands of novels James H. Murphy.

In the Victorian age there were hundreds of Irish authors who wrote thousands of novels. Some had Irish themes, others did not. Many were highly popular with what was largely a British reading audience. However, their achievements were disparaged and their work largely forgotten from the era of W. B. Yeats and the Irish Literary Revival, with its culturally nationalist agenda, onwards. This book is the first comprehensive study of these writers, based on a reading of around 370 novels by 150 authors. In the Victorian age there were hundreds of Irish authors who wrote thousands of novels.

Recommend this journal. Irish Historical Studies.

Personal Name: Murphy, James H. (DE-576)167937707. General Note: Includes bibliographical references and index. English fiction Irish authors History and criticism blmsh English fiction 19th century History and criticism blmsh Literature and society Ireland History 19th century blmsh. Download now Irish novelists and the Victorian age by James H. Murphy: Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

Автор: Murphy, James H. Название: Irish Novelists and the Victorian Age Издательство: Oxford Academ .

2011 Язык: ENG Размер: 243 x 165 x 20 Читательская аудитория: Students and scholars of Irish and Victorian literature Рейтинг: Поставляется из: Англии Описание: This book is the first comprehensive study of fiction written by Irish authors during the Victorian age.

Victorian literature is literature, mainly written in English, during the reign of Queen Victoria (1837–1901) (the Victorian era). It was preceded by Romanticism and followed by the Edwardian era (1901–1910)

Victorian literature is literature, mainly written in English, during the reign of Queen Victoria (1837–1901) (the Victorian era). It was preceded by Romanticism and followed by the Edwardian era (1901–1910). While in the preceding Romantic period, poetry had been the conquerors, novels were the emperors of the Victorian period. Charles Dickens (1812–1870) dominated the first part of Victoria's reign and most rightly can be called "The King of Victorian Literature".

James H. Murphy, P. His study, Irish Novelists and the Victorian Age, will be published by OUP in 2011. is Professor of English and was also for a time Director of Irish Studies at DePaul University, Chicago, having previously taught in Ireland. He specialises in nineteenth-century Ireland, focusing particularly on the history of the novel and on the political history of the period. He has twice been president of the Society for the Study of Nineteenth-Century Ireland.

This is the first comprehensive study of the neglected Irish writers of the Victorian age, whose work was highly popular with the British reading audience and therefore disparaged and largely forgotten from the era of W.B. Yeats and the Irish Literary Revival, with its culturally nationalist agenda, onwards. It is based on a reading of around 370 novels by 150 authors, including William Carleton, the peasant novelist who wielded much influence, and Charles Lever, whose serious work was destroyed by the slur of 'rollicking', as well as Joseph Sheridan LeFanu, George Moore, Emily Lawless, Somerville and Ross, Bram Stoker, and three of the leading authors from the new-woman movement, Sarah Grand, Iota, and George Egerton. James H. Murphy examines their writing in a variety of contexts: the political, economic, and cultural developments of the time; the vicissitudes of the reading audience; the realities of a publishing industry that was for the most part London-based; the often difficult circumstances of the lives of the novelists; and the ever changing genre of the novel itself, to which Irish authors often made a contribution. Politics, history, religion, gender and, particularly, land, over which nineteenth-century Ireland was deeply divided, featured as key themes for fiction. Finally, the book engages with the critical debate of recent times concerning the supposed failure of realism in the nineteenth-century Irish novel, looking for deeper causes than have hitherto been offered and discovering occasions on which realism turned out to be possible.
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