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eBook Zofloya: Or the Moor (Oxford World's Classics) ePub

by Kim Ian Michasiw,Charlotte Dacre

eBook Zofloya: Or the Moor (Oxford World's Classics) ePub
Author: Kim Ian Michasiw,Charlotte Dacre
Language: English
ISBN: 0192839349
ISBN13: 978-0192839343
Publisher: Oxford University Press (June 1999)
Pages: 306
Category: History & Criticism
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 112
Formats: rtf txt lrf mobi
ePub file: 1962 kb
Fb2 file: 1609 kb

Series: Oxford World's Classics. Paperback: 320 pages.

Series: Oxford World's Classics. Charlotte Dacre, also known as Rosa Matilda, has a penchant for telling you how things happened, instead of showing you. While it has strong themes of education, it ties in pretty close with Matthew Lewis' The Monk, a book that affected her (Charlotte Dacre) so much that she took the name of one of the characters (Matilda) and name dropped several of the characters. I did not enjoy reading this book.

Items related to Zofloya: Or the Moor (Oxford World's Classics) . Charlotte Dacre Zofloya: Or the Moor (Oxford World's Classics). ISBN 13: 9780192839343. Zofloya: Or the Moor (Oxford World's Classics). Charlotte Dacre's narrative deftly displays her heroine's movement from the vitalized position of Ann Radcliffe's heroines to a fully conscious commitment to vice that goes beyond that of & Lewis's deluded Ambrosio.

In the literary world, Charlotte Dacre, as she became known, has been an obscure and forgotten figure but her works, with their feminist streak, are becoming ever more popular. Charlotte Dacre died on 7th November 1825. At this juncture it may not be amiss for a few moments to digress, in stating, that at the period which commences this history, the Venetians were a proud, strict, and fastidious people-in no country was the pride of nobility carried to a greater extent; their manners, also, received a deep and gloomy tincture from the nature of their government, which in.

17 of 100 Classics Challenge. Zofloya, or The Moor By Charlotte Darce 1806 Oxford Classics.

I’d recommend holding off on the introduction until after reading the book, for the same reason. 17 of 100 Classics Challenge. Set in Venice, late 15th Century, this is a story of a spoilt daughter, Victoria, whose indulgent aristocratic parents. She falls into a period of being abused and kept captive.

My Oxford Worlds Classic Collection The Book Castle - Продолжительность: 2:34 The Book Castle Recommended for you. 2:34. STRESSED Bean Mr Bean Full Episodes Mr Bean Official - Продолжительность: 47:30 Mr Bean Recommended for you.

Zofloya: or The Moor - Oxford World's Classics (Paperback). This is the final judgement of Satan on Victoria di Loredani, the heroine of Zofloya, or The Moor (1806), a tale of lust, betrayal, and multiple murder set in Venice in the last days of the fifteenth century. The novel follows Victoria's progress from spoilt daughter of indulgent aristocrats, through a period of abuse and captivity, to a career of deepening criminality conducted under Satan's watchful eye.

This is the final judgement of Satan on Victoria di Loredani, the heroine of Zofloya, or The Moor (1806), a tale of lust, betrayal, and multiple murder set in Venice in the last days of the fifteenth century.

Oxford World's Classics. Oxford World's Classics.

Zofloya or The Moor by Charlotte Dacre 9780199549733 (Paperback, 2008) Delivery UK delivery is within 3 to 5 working days. Read full description. Zofloya: or The Moor by Charlotte Dacre (Paperback, 2008). Brand new: lowest price.

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Zofloya : or The Moor. Oxford World's Classics (Paperback). The novel's most daring aspect is its anatomy of Victoria's intense sexual attraction to her Moorish servant Zofloya that transgresses taboos both of class and race.

`Few venture as thou hast in the alarming paths of sin.' This is the final judgement of Satan on Victoria di Loredani, the heroine of Zofloya, or The Moor (1806), a tale of lust, betrayal, and multiple murder set in Venice in the last days of the fifteenth century. The novel follows Victoria's progress from spoilt daughter of indulgent aristocrats, through a period of abuse and captivity, to a career of deepening criminality conducted under Satan's watchful eye. Charlotte Dacre's narrative deftly displays her heroine's movement from the vitalized position of Ann Radcliffe's heroines to a fully conscious commitment to vice that goes beyond that of `Monk' Lewis's deluded Ambrosio. The novel's most daring aspect is its anatomy of Victoria's intense sexual attraction to her Moorish servant Zofloya that transgresses taboos both of class and race. A minor scandal on its first publication, and a significant influence on Byron and Shelley, Zofloya has been unduly neglected. Contradicting idealized stereotypes of women's writing, the novel's portrait of indulged desire, gratuitous cruelty, and monumental self-absorption retains considerable power to disturb. The introduction to this edition, the first for nearly 200 years, examines why Zofloya deserves to be read alongside established Gothic classics as the highly original work of an intriguing and unconventional writer.
Zan
This book fits loosely into the early goth/horror genre and gives an interesting insight into what a scare lover like myself might have been reading back in the day. The plot concerns a noble lady in Italy who wanders slowly further and further off the path of rightousness under the influence of the mysterious Zofloya, a moor in her service. The suspense builds very well until the true identity of Zofloya is revealed at the very end with dammning consequences for the noble lady. The language is very old fashioned and takes a little getting used to. In some ways this is a very slow book but if you're prepared to perservere with it the suspense builds and it ties itself up very well in the end.
If you are a bit of a horror/gothic novel conissuer like myself and know quality dark lit when you read it you won't be dissapointed with this book, however other readers might find it a bit too slow and old fashioned for their tastes.
Beazerdred
Had to get this book for my novel club for one of my graduate classes. Nice to finally read a gothic female author. Interesting book and I recommend it to anyone who is interested in a melodramatic gothic read.
Framokay
I've read this book twice and I think it's just fantastic. If you enjoy weird fiction (Machan,Hodgson,Lovecraft) don't miss this one. It's compared a lot to Lewis's The Monk but I like Zofloya more.
Marilore
Charlotte Dacre, also known as Rosa Matilda, has a penchant for telling you how things happened, instead of showing you. While it has strong themes of education, it ties in pretty close with Matthew Lewis' The Monk, a book that affected her (Charlotte Dacre) so much that she took the name of one of the characters (Matilda) and name dropped several of the characters.

I did not enjoy reading this book.
Frlas
Good book. Crazy stuff happens in it. Fast shipping
Kamuro
This book is extremely dated. The racism and classism are blatant - those born noble can be recognized as superior even when they are dressed as peasants, and the dark-skinned Moor's inferiority is obvious to all the other characters - even though the most despicable characters are born to the nobility. The conversion to electronic format is extremely poor, with occasional words that make no sense at all and a huge number of misplaced punctuation marks. I read this as part of a book group. I would not recommend it to anyone, and would recommend that any other book groups leave this off their reading lists.
Jockahougu
Kim Ian Michasiw is the associate professor at my university (York U in Toronto!) and he's awesome. He brilliantly sets up his ideas in the introduction of this work and provides, as clearly as he can, something of a chronology (much is yet to be known about Dacre's life). The book is an interesting study in gothic literature and feminine writing circa Jane Austen.
Eighteenth-century trash, actually. Lots of sex and violence, elegantly written. Also interesting in its portrayal of race and the sexualization of "The moor". A perverse work, actually.
This was my first time ordering all of my books online for my college classes. I was a bit hesitant not being able to see the books before I purchased them, however, it turns out I didn't need to be. The book was in excellent condition, nothing to hinder my use of it for class. It was also much less expensive than I would have paid at the book store here. I haven't read the book yet, but it looks like it will be a great fit for the class.
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