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eBook Why I Write (Penguin Great Ideas) ePub

by George Orwell

eBook Why I Write (Penguin Great Ideas) ePub
Author: George Orwell
Language: English
ISBN: 0143036351
ISBN13: 978-0143036357
Publisher: Penguin Books (September 6, 2005)
Pages: 128
Category: History & Criticism
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 158
Formats: mobi docx rtf mbr
ePub file: 1546 kb
Fb2 file: 1264 kb

Why I Write This little book contains four essays written between 1931 and 1946.

From a very early age, perhaps the age of five or six, I knew that when I grew up I should be a writer. Between the ages of about seventeen and twenty-four I tried to abandon this idea, but I did so with the consciousness that I was outraging my true nature and that sooner or later I should have to settle down and write books. This little book contains four essays written between 1931 and 1946. But the bulk of the book (85 of 120 pages) is taken up by one essay, "The Lion and the Unicorn: Socialism and the English Genius," written in 1940.

Penguin Great Ideas is a series of largely non-fiction books published by Penguin Books. Titles contained within this series are considered to be world-changing, influential and inspirational.

The Lion and the Unicorn. From a very early age, perhaps the age of five or six, I knew that when I grew up I should be a writer.

Throughout history, some books have changed the world

Throughout history, some books have changed the world. Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization, and helped make us who we are. Whether puncturing the lies of politicians, wittily dissecting the English character or telling unpalatable truths about war, Orwell's timeless, uncompromising essays are more relevant, entertaining and essential than ever in today's era of spin.

Penguin strikes again with a wonderful new series called "Great Ideas" featuring 12 books by great thinkers dating back to the first millennium . through the mid-20th century, covering art, politics, literature, philosophy, science, history, and more

Why I Write book If you're a fan of all things Orwellian then this is great little book which provides a framework for his literary life; experiences an. .

Employing Orwell's essay structure, I should start with an understanding of my true nature and with a return to my childhood. If you're a fan of all things Orwellian then this is great little book which provides a framework for his literary life; experiences and ideas that Orwell used to create some of his literary masterpieces including 1984, Animal Farm and The Road to Wigan Pier.

Производитель: "Penguin Books Lt. Серия: "Great Ideas". Throughout history, some books have changed the world. Why I Write - (1946) is an essay by George Orwell detailing his personal journey to becoming a writer. They have transformed the way we see ourselves - and each other.

70 books in this series. Thank you for signing up to the Penguin Newsletter. Browse books in this series.

Why I Write - Penguin Great Ideas (Paperback). George Orwell (author). Paperback 128 Pages, Published: 02/09/2004 Added to basket.

Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization, and helped make us who we are. Format Paperback 128 pages. Dimensions 111 x 181 x 7mm 81g. Publication date 02 Sep 2004. Publisher Penguin Books Ltd.

A selection of George Orwell's politically charged essays on language and writing that give context to his dystopian classic, 1984Throughout history, some books have changed the world. They have transformed the way we see ourselves—and each other. They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution. They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted. They have enriched lives—and destroyed them.Now, Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization, and helped make us who we are. Penguin's Great Ideas series features twelve groundbreaking works by some of history's most prodigious thinkers, and each volume is beautifully packaged with a unique type-drive design that highlights the bookmaker's art. Offering great literature in great packages at great prices, this series is ideal for those readers who want to explore and savor the Great Ideas that have shaped the world.Whether puncturing the lies of politicians, wittily dissecting the English character or telling unpalatable truths about war, Orwell's timeless, uncompromising essays are more relevant, entertaining and essential than ever in today's era of spin.
Jode
Orwell calls his homeland, England, "the most class-ridden country under the sun. It is a land of snobbery and privilege, ruled largely by the old and silly." Although they were written right after WWII, these essays are appropriate as descriptions for contemporary America. Every bit as biting and true as his fiction (1984 and Animal Farm).
blodrayne
Great pocket Orwell to whip out when your friends are being obfuscating dicks.
Mariwyn
This little book contains four essays written between 1931 and 1946. But the bulk of the book (85 of 120 pages) is taken up by one essay, "The Lion and the Unicorn: Socialism and the English Genius," written in 1940. The others are "Why I Write" (1946), "A Hanging" (1931), and "Politics and the English Language" (1946). I am not sure why these four essays are joined in this one volume or why the title of the volume is the title of one of the short essays. All of the essays are about politics in one way or another, but only the first and last deal with the profession of being a writer. Also, there is no introduction by an editor that might explain this collection.

In spite of this mystery, the book is a good introduction to Orwell, the essayist. One gets a taste of him early on in 1931, during the physical and psychological pounding of the Blitz (1940), and in his full maturity in 1946.

In "The Hanging," the young Orwell expresses his moral revulsion at capital punishment. As a policeman in Burma, he had to watch the hanging of a Hindu man. The crime for which the man is being executed is never named. Thus, we are forced to concentrate on the act of hanging a human being, rather than the execution of a criminal. Orwell writes, "I saw the mystery, the unspeakable wrongness, of cutting a life short when it is in full tide." (p. 98)

The long essay, "The Lion and the Unicorn," was written in 1940 as German planes were bombing London. This brings Orwell to reflect on patriotism and its inexplicable strength throughout Britain's highly stratified society. His essay is partly an analysis of three economic/social systems---capitalism, socialism, and fascism---in a time of war. He concludes that England will survive only if it undergoes a socialistic revolution.

In "Why I Write," Orwell admits that he writes for political reasons. In fact, he believes that all good books are political. His goal is to make political writing into an art.

"Politics and the English Language" may be one of his most famous essays. I find it reprinted in different collections of Orwell's essays. Here he is most specific in telling us what makes writing good or bad. He lists several bad practices: dying metaphors, operators or verbal false limbs, pretentious diction, and meaningless words. But he targets lack of sincerity as the worse culprit. He calls it "the enemy of clear language." And, as in "Why I Write," he reminds us that "all issues are political issues." He concludes by helpfully providing us with these six rules:
1. Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.
2. Never use a long word where a short one will do.
3. If it is possible to cut out a word, always cut it out.
4. Never use the passive where you can use the active.
5. Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent.
6. Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.

Orwell confesses that if we look back through his essay, we can probably catch him breaking his own rules. But the point is not to be fastidious, but to work towards clarity of speech. He writes, "If you simplify your English, you are freed from the worst follies of orthodoxy."
Sha
I am making up my mind about the book.
Before telling what I didn't like, here are the lines I liked:
*Hitler will at any rate go down in history as the man who made the City of London laugh on the wrong side of its face.
*War is the greatest of all agents of change. It speeds up all processes, wipes out minor distinctions, brings realities to the surface. Above all, war brings it home to the individual. That he is NOT altogether an individual.
* England is perhaps the only great country whose intellectuals are ashamed of their own nationality.
* Nations do not escape from their past merely by making a revolution.
* English language becomes ugly and inaccurate because our thoughts are foolish, but the slovenliness of our language makes it easier for us to have foolish thoughts.

The book is good, very good, at most of the places.
But some views of George Orwell-- GEORGE ORWELL (Et tu, Brute?)-- were offensive to any Indian who has read Indian history. His opinions on India's struggle for independence (and India's future without British Colony) were not well-researched. I genuinely want to give him a benefit of doubt because I am a die-hard fan of his fictions.
That said, the book is good at most of the places.
Balhala
...it was an interesting collection of essays but the title is misleading, this is mostly an angry-old-man rant about WWII era UK, not bad, just not what I was expecting
Llathidan
Not what I expected, a smaller that normal thin book, but it has some thought provoking ideas glad I got it
Amhirishes
five stars
Great read!
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