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eBook Digenis Akritis (Cambridge Medieval Classics) ePub

by Jeffreys

eBook Digenis Akritis (Cambridge Medieval Classics) ePub
Author: Jeffreys
Language: English
ISBN: 0521397766
ISBN13: 978-0521397766
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (July 8, 2004)
Pages: 464
Category: History & Criticism
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 772
Formats: mbr lrf azw lrf
ePub file: 1231 kb
Fb2 file: 1245 kb

Digenis Akritis" is Byzantium's only epic poem, telling of the exploits of a heroic warrior of "double descent" on the frontiers between Byzantine and Arab territory in Asia Minor in the ninth and tenth centuries

Digenis Akritis" is Byzantium's only epic poem, telling of the exploits of a heroic warrior of "double descent" on the frontiers between Byzantine and Arab territory in Asia Minor in the ninth and tenth centuries. Издательство: Cambridge University Press.

Informationen zum Titel Digenis Akritis aus der Reihe Cambridge Medieval Classics [mit . Digenis Akritas (Legendary character)-Poetry.

Informationen zum Titel Digenis Akritis aus der Reihe Cambridge Medieval Classics Book Description Digenis Akritis is Byzantium's only epic poem, telling of the exploits of a heroic warrior of 'double descent' on the frontiers between Byzantine and Arab territory in Asia Minor in the ninth and tenth centuries. Digenis Akritas (Legendary character)-Poetry

Author: Elizabeth Jeffreys.

Author: Elizabeth Jeffreys. Gregory of Nazianzus: Autobiographical Poems (Cambridge Medieval Classics) Medieval Russia, 980-1584 (Cambridge Medieval Textbooks).

The epic was first written down in the twelfth century, but its story takes place during the period between the eighth and tenth centuries.

Published online by Cambridge University Press: 22 January 2016. Views captured on Cambridge Core between

Jeffreys, E. (Cambridge 1998)

Jeffreys, E. (Cambridge 1998). 49 Jouanno, Digénis Akritas, 53 also believes that Digenes only fights for personal reasons, which contrasts with his title of Akrites. 101 Dyck, . ‘On Digenes Akrites, Grottaferrata version, Book 6’, GRBS 28 (1987) 349-69, more specifically 365-6, thinks there is a need for some kind of punishment for Maximo, as do Jeffreys, Digenis Akritis, 201 and Jouanno, Digénis Akritas, 183. 102 The Greek term to which this adjective refers is the adverb ‘άθλίως’.

Cambridge Medieval Classics, . Cambridge, En. Cambridge University Press, 1998. Cambridge Medieval Classics, . Digenis Akritis: The Grottaferrata and Escorial Versions.

Translator: Jeffreys, Elizabeth. Cambridge medieval classics 7. Place of Publication: Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York. Publisher: Cambridge University Press. Publication Year: 1998.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Digenis Akritis: The Grottaferrata and Escorial Versions (Cambridge Medieval Classics). Elizabeth Jeffreys, Michael Jeffreys, Roger Scott (eds).

"Digenis Akritis" is Byzantium's only epic poem, telling of the exploits of a heroic warrior of "double descent" on the frontiers between Byzantine and Arab territory in Asia Minor in the ninth and tenth centuries. It survives partially in six versions, of which the two oldest are edited here. This edition and translation aims to highlight the nature of the lost poem, and to provide a guide through the maze of recent discussions about the epic and its background.
Undeyn
A version which includes two of the six most important copies of "Digenis Akritas".
Brannylv
Elizabeth Jeffreys' edition of Digenis Akritas is a great read! She includes a fresh translation of the two earliest manuscripts and provides helpful footnotes for a reader unfamiliar with the Byzantine background of the poem. The epic was first written down in the twelfth century, but its story takes place during the period between the eighth and tenth centuries. I would definitely recommend anyone interested in medieval literature to check it out.

Basil Digenis Akritas (Basil the Half-Blood Border Guard) is the main character in Byzantium's greatest epic. Basil is an Akritai (border guard) on the frontiers of Cappadocia during the Arab-Byzantine Wars. His noble birth by the daughter of a Strategos (Byzantine General) and an Arab Emir can only rivaled by his ridiculous exploits. He slays lions with his bare hands, hews horses in half with the stroke of a sword, and fights forces ten times his number with only a stick (Yep). Basil is rewarded with an imperial edict granting him sovereignty over new lands reconquered along the Euphrates. Of course our hero isn't perfect, Basil despite being married to a beautiful (and noble) woman, falls into adultery twice. There are hints of Classical Greece in the activity of Eros in the narrative, a serpent that resembles a Hydra, and Basil's exploits are compared to Bellerophon and Hercules. But of course our epic is Byzantine, so there are demonic forces, angelic guardians, supplications to the Mother of God, recitations of the nicene creed, and a hymn to the consubstantiality of the Holy Trinity. If you liked Beowulf, this will put a smile on your face. Cheers!
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