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eBook Conjugal Union: The Body, the House, and the Black American (Race and American Culture) ePub

by Robert F. Reid-Pharr

eBook Conjugal Union: The Body, the House, and the Black American (Race and American Culture) ePub
Author: Robert F. Reid-Pharr
Language: English
ISBN: 0195104021
ISBN13: 978-0195104028
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (July 22, 1999)
Pages: 192
Category: History & Criticism
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 721
Formats: azw lrf txt lrf
ePub file: 1899 kb
Fb2 file: 1611 kb

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Conjugal Union: The Body, the House, and the Black American. Race and American Culture). by. Robert F. Reid-Pharr.

Reid-Pharr, by contrast, takes pains to 'belabor' his points, resulting in a much more succint, and ultimately .

Reid-Pharr, by contrast, takes pains to 'belabor' his points, resulting in a much more succint, and ultimately more satisfying piece of scholarship. -American Literature. Conjugal Union's greatest strength lies in Reid-Pharr's willingness to complicate, in necessary ways, not only classic treatments of modern narrative, but his own analysis as well.

In Conjugal Union, Robert F. Reid-Pharr argues that . Chapter 1 ENGENDERING RACE. 15. Chapter 2 AMERICAN PANORAMA. Reid-Pharr argues that during the antebellum period a community of free black northeastern intellectuals sought to establish the stability of a Black American subjectivity by figuring the black body as the necessary antecedent to any intelligible Black American public presence. Reid-Pharr goes on to argue that the fact of the black body's constant and often spectacular display demonstrates an incredible uncertainty as to that body's status. 37. Chapter 3 CLEAN HOUSE PECULIAR PEOPLE. 65. Chapter 4 BLACK WHITE AND YELLER. Reid-Pharr argues that during the antebellum period a community of free black northeastern intellectuals sought to establish the stability of a Black American subjectivity by figuring the black body as the necessary antecedent to any intelligible Black Americanpublic.

Instead, he argues, black American intellectuals have actively chosen the . Reid-Pharr is Professor of Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality at Harvard University.

Instead, he argues, black American intellectuals have actively chosen the identity schemes that seem to us so natural today. Reid-Pharr then examines a number of responses to this presumed erosion of black innocence, paying particular attention to articulations of black masculinity by Huey Newton, one of the two founders of the Black Panther Party, and Melvin Van Peebles, director of the classic film Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song.

Robert F. In his new book, Robert Reid-Pharr argues that black gender and sexuality have always played a crucial role in questions of black national identity. He identifies the origins of a "national" African American literature in the founding of the Black press in 1827 and the beginnings of a novelistic tradition in the antebellum period.

Robert Reid-Pharr is an American literary and cultural critic and professor. A native North Carolinian, Reid-Pharr holds a . in political science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and both an . in African American studies and a P. in American studies from Yale University. In 2016 he was named a fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and visiting professor of gender and sexuality at Harvard University.

In Conjugal Union, Robert F. Reid-Pharr argues that during the antebellum period a community of free black northeastern intellectuals sought to establish the stability of a Black American subjectivity by figuring the black body as the necessary antecedent to any intelligible Black American public presence. Reid-Pharr goes on to argue that the fact of the black body's constant and often spectacular display demonstrates an incredible uncertainty as to that body's status. Thus antebellum black intellectuals were always anxious about how a stable relationship between the black community might be maintained. Paying particular attention to Black American novels written before the Civil War, the author shows how the household was utilized by these writers to normalize this relationship of body to community such that a person could enter a household as a white and leave it as a black.
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