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eBook Myth, Ritual, and the Warrior in Roman and Indo-European Antiquity ePub

by Roger D. Woodard

eBook Myth, Ritual, and the Warrior in Roman and Indo-European Antiquity ePub
Author: Roger D. Woodard
Language: English
ISBN: 1107022401
ISBN13: 978-1107022409
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (January 28, 2013)
Pages: 301
Category: History & Criticism
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 215
Formats: mobi lrf lrf docx
ePub file: 1148 kb
Fb2 file: 1827 kb

Woodard, Roger D. 2006. Indo-European Sacred Space. Woodard, Roger D. 2011. Book summary views reflect the number of visits to the book and chapter landing pages.

Woodard, Roger D. The Roman Regifugium: Myth and Ritual of the King’s Journey Beyond the Boundary. In Meurant 2011, pp. 304–332.

Roger D. Woodard examines the figure of the returning warrior as depicted in the myths of several ancient and medieval Indo-European cultures

Roger D. Woodard examines the figure of the returning warrior as depicted in the myths of several ancient and medieval Indo-European cultures. In these cultures, the returning warrior was often portrayed as a figure rendered dysfunctionally destructive or isolationist by the horrors of combat

This book examines the returning warrior as depicted in the myths of several ancient and medieval Indo-European cultures, often portrayed as a figure rendered dysfunctionally destructive or isolationist by the horrors of combat. Roger Woodard compares portrayals among these cultures and identifies a common origin of the myths.

This book examines the figure of the returning warrior as depicted in the myths of several ancient and .

This book examines the figure of the returning warrior as depicted in the myths of several ancient and medieval Indo-European cultures. In these cultures, the returning warrior was often portrayed as a figure rendered dysfunctionally destructive or isolationist by the horrors of combat.

To ask other readers questions about Myth, Ritual, and the Warrior in Roman . Roger Dillard Woodard was born in 1951.

Lists with This Book. Basically, this book claims that certain rituals in Indo-European daughter cultures are a portrayal of how society deals with a warrior who is returning from war. How it deals with his PSTD. He looks mainly at the Roman culture but also draws on the Irish, and Indic cultures. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Woodard takes this challenge on with intelligence and dexterity to, examine Roman rituals and Indo-European myths. We are led by the warrior god Indra, and confronted in turn by CuChulainn, Hercules, and Batraz, in a thrilling comparative journey, traced by a master hand. Claude Calame, Directeur d'études. l'Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris.

This book examines the figure of the returning warrior as depicted in the myths of several ancient and medieval Indo-European cultures. In these cultures, the returning warrior was often portrayed as a figure rendered dysfunctionally destructive or isolationist by the horrors of combat

This book examines the figure of the returning warrior as depicted in the myths of several ancient and medieval Indo-European cultures.

Similar books and articles. The Roman Wedding Hersch The Roman Wedding Technicians in Graeco-Roman Cultures (. Cuomo Technology and Culture in Greek and Roman Antiquity. The Roman Wedding Hersch The Roman Wedding. Ritual and Meaning in Antiquity. Pp. Xii + 342, Pls. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. ISBN: 978-0-521-12427-0. Technicians in Graeco-Roman Cultures (. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. ISBN: 978-0-521-00903-4 (ISBN: 978-0-521-81073-9 Hbk).

edu and the wider internet faster and more securely, please take a few seconds to upgrade your browser. Woodard, Myth, Ritual, and the Warrior in Roman and Indo-European Antiquity, in Wékwos. Revue d'études indo-européennes, 2 (2015-2016), pp. 321-323.

This book examines the figure of the returning warrior as depicted in the myths of several ancient and medieval Indo-European cultures. In these cultures, the returning warrior was often portrayed as a figure rendered dysfunctionally destructive or isolationist by the horrors of combat. This mythic portrayal of the returned warrior is consistent with modern studies of similar behavior among soldiers returning from war. Roger Woodard's research identifies a common origin of these myths in the ancestral proto-Indo-European culture, in which rites were enacted to enable warriors to reintegrate themselves as functional members of society. He also compares the Italic, Indo-Iranian, and Celtic mythic traditions surrounding the warrior, paying particular attention to Roman myth and ritual, notably to the etiologies and rites of the July festivals of the Poplifugia and Nonae Caprotinae, and to the October rites of the Sororium Tigillum.
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