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eBook I Was the Jukebox: Poems ePub

by Sandra Beasley

eBook I Was the Jukebox: Poems ePub
Author: Sandra Beasley
Language: English
ISBN: 0393076512
ISBN13: 978-0393076516
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1 edition (April 5, 2010)
Pages: 96
Category: Poetry
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 862
Formats: mobi rtf docx mobi
ePub file: 1190 kb
Fb2 file: 1416 kb

Overall this book is absolutely a must

Only 10 left in stock (more on the way). Only 12 left in stock (more on the way). Overall this book is absolutely a must. Make no mistake: Sandra Beasley's world is what Sir Paul McCartney once called "the world in which we live i. You will not find an escape route from reality in "I was the Jukebox. These poems are not consciousness replacement therapy. Instead they have that intriguing quality of great art: They sharpen the mind.

I Was the Jukebox book. These poems are fresh, crisp, and muscular  . They are poems I would give to someone who wasn't into poetry, or someone just starting to read poems. They are straightforward, easy to understand, but still really good. I think these poets are great for poetry. Beasley said in her book that a lot of the poems were written during NaPoWriMo.

Sandra Beasley is the author of Don't Kill the Birthday Girl: Tales from an Allergic Life, a memoir and cultural history of food allergies, as well as three poetry collections: Count the Waves; I Was the Jukebox.

Sandra Beasley is the author of Don't Kill the Birthday Girl: Tales from an Allergic Life, a memoir and cultural history of food allergies, as well as three poetry collections: Count the Waves; I Was the Jukebox, which won the 2009 Barnard Women Poetry Prize, selected by Joy Harjo; and Theories of Falling, which won the New Issues Poetry Prize judged b. Awards for her work includes a 2015 Literature Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, two fellowships from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, and the Maureen Egen Writers Exchange Award from Poets & Writers.

lightness works best when it dapples her darkness-and when her darkness, as it. .Books related to I Was the Jukebox: Poems.

lightness works best when it dapples her darkness-and when her darkness, as it often does, feels truly deep. In these poems these soulful ones elbow their way to the surface of the page, smartly into the contemporary now. -Joy Harjo, prize citation. from The Piano Speaks For an hour I forgot my fat self, my neurotic innards, my addiction to alignment. For an hour I forgot my fear of rain.

Sandra Beasley takes this voice to the voiceless to the absurd extreme. Such defamiliarization with the subject-speaker gives us an amusing and sometimes insightful look into the voiceless. As the title I Was the Jukebox hints, Beasley gives vocal chords to world wars, pianos, the platypus, and, evidently, a jukebox. Her project’s challenge is to inhabit anything that contemporary humans cannot communicate with via words. Words may create the foundation of poetry, but the words in Beasley’s work more so create the foundation of character in the inanimate, personality in the object. Such defamiliarization with the subject-speaker gives us an amusing and sometimes insightful look into the voiceless

You could be forgiven if you let the clever conceits in Sandra Beasley’s . There are three of the 39-line poems in I was the Jukebox, inventively twisty pieces whose obsessive repetitions tend to sneak up on you.

You could be forgiven if you let the clever conceits in Sandra Beasley’s latest collection distract you. Or if you spent the whole 90 pages identifying with the cast of slightly neurotic speakers-an orchid who refuses to be another table pet, a lonely eggplant walking the thin line, between love and bribery in a bar.

A video for the poem "The Story," which is included in Sandra Beasley's collection I WAS THE JUKEBOX: POEMS (. Money-saving tricks and hacks.

lightness works best when it dapples her darkness-and when her darkness, as it often does, feels . from "The Piano Speaks" For an hour I forgot my fat self, my neurotic innards, my addiction to alignment. For an hour I forgot my fear of rain

from "The Piano Speaks" For an hour I forgot my fat self, my neurotic innards, my addiction to alignment.

Best Poem of Sandra Beasley. Let Me Count The Waves. You must not skirt the issue wearing skirts. You must not duck the bullet using ducks.

The winner of the 2009 Barnard Women Poets Prize―“fresh, crisp, and muscular.”

“These poems are fresh, crisp, and muscular. They are decisive and fearless. Every object, icon, or historical moment has a soul with a voice. In these poems these soulful ones elbow their way to the surface of the page, smartly into the contemporary now.”―Joy Harjo, prize citation from “The Piano Speaks”      For an hour I forgot my fat self,      my neurotic innards, my addiction to alignment.      For an hour I forgot my fear of rain.      For an hour I was a salamander      shimmying through the kelp in search of shore,      and under his fingers the notes slid loose      from my belly in a long jellyrope of eggs      that took root in the mud.
Envias
I am going to attempt to explain what I feel about this collection of poetry, without stating what has already been displayed.

I like 20th century poetry. Plath and T.S Eliot are my cup of tea. However, Beasley, though a not-so-common name in public (Though in the poetry world I hail her as the second coming) has very much potential. In fact, she breaks through some lines and beats that convey a mixture of emotions from me. Some were funny (You brought WHAT on a roller coaster?) while others were downright thought provoking. She really is a fine example of modern poetry expressed, I think.

I gave this a four out of five (I really do wish I could give a 4.5) due to the fact that some inexplicable part of her poetry is slightly...off. Then again, we are two different humans. With two different voices, perceptions, opinions...there is this place of poetry where things "Click" and make sense; nirvana, if you will. And, though I feel that reading Eliot and Plath (Especially Berck-Plage) I could not find that great, swelling feeling here.

However, there still is feeling. Very much so. Just not as much as the "gods" of poetry.

FINAL WORD:
I will continue to buy from Beasley. I love her style and wording, rhythm and playfulness. I can't wait to see more from her and she is a joy to read. I recommend it. :)
Peles
I love this writer. Her poems are intimate cameras, held at odd angles, and pointed in odd places. Her language is masterful. I am certainly no expert in poetry, but I know what I like, and Beasley makes me say to myself, "yes, that is exactly how to say that".

I hope she continues to evolve and write. I already can't wait to buy her next book.
Ziena
LOVE POEM FOR LOS ANGELES may be the best poem very written about this place.

Overall this book is absolutely a must. Make no mistake: Sandra Beasley's world is what Sir Paul McCartney once called "the world in which we live in." You will not find an escape route from reality in "I was the Jukebox." These poems are not consciousness replacement therapy. Instead they have that intriguing quality of great art: They sharpen the mind.

Sandra Beasley's writing reminds me of François Hemsterhuis' definition of The Beautiful (which also happens to be my definition): "that which gives us the greatest number of ideas in the shortest space of time." These poems have an abundance of perceptive and original irony, and what is most unusual in our era: real wit, without meanness, sloppy comedy or scatology. The concern they exhibit for language per se -- both for its follies and for its hidden implications -- almost reminds me of Wittgenstein. Every statement she makes contains the DNA of a question. Sandra Beasley has her own way of pushing the envelope, of making the reader uncomfortable in his or her complacency of thought. So much the better. The experience is invigorating.

Spend a short space of time with "I was the Jukebox," and I assure you, you will want to spend a longer one.
Nekora
Awesome. "We are living in someone's antiquity. They will study our compromises--" from Sandra Beasley's poem, Antiquity. Gorgeous, gorgeous work.
Ustamya
I heard Sandra Beasley read at Iota in Arlington and was so impressed that I bought her new book. Her poems have a playful, surreal quality. I enjoyed her riffs on mythology such as in "Another Failed Poem About the Greeks." The last section of the book is darker and more poignant. "Exits" is powerful.
Falya
Sandra Beasley doesn't approach her work in a straightforward manner. Instead, she assumes unorthodox perspectives, creates strange and thought-provoking metaphors, and challenging herself with poetic forms such as sestinas (and does she OWN that form like a boss). All of this is evident throughout I WAS THE JUKEBOX, where Beasley writes about everything from platypi and minotaurs, to college students and music. Sometimes she's humorous and flirtatious. Other times, pensive and visceral. Still others, passionate yet philosophical.

My only critique is that, even though I thoroughly enjoyed many of the poems, I wasn't as moved emotionally by I WAS THE JUKEBOX as I have been by other poetry books I've read this year. Beasley is more of a thinker and innovator with her work, and some readers may find that quality more appealing. That said, I would read more of Sandra Beasley's poetry in a heartbeat and would recommend I WAS THE JUKEBOX to any poetry fans who are seeking something a little more unconventional.
from earth
Ever since she came to Georgia Southern University's campus, I've wanted to read Sandra Beasley's latest book of poems, which has been on my Amazon wishlist for a while. One of the students that I tutor, a good friend of mine named Nadia Dreid, gave me a gift bag for helping her throughout he semester--how did she know? I imagine her questioning mutual friends under piercing lamplight in a CSI fantasy.

Anyways, I read through the book delighting over the poems that Beasley had read to me--and the others in the classroom--herself; the voice in my head inferior to hers. In the book, Beasley speaks from the point of view of an eggplant, of orchids, of a jukebox, and many other inanimate objects and animals. Though all of the poems are exceptional, I want to draw your attention to one titled "The Cutting Board (p. 57)."

This poem reminds me of her memoir Don't Kill the Birthday Girl, where she depicts how it's like to live with multiple food allergies. Over the years the cutting board was with her, "counting out almonds for the car, sandwiches for the plane." The images in this poem are very strong, like all of them in the collection, and really puts you into the scene.
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