lind-peinture
» » Third Class Superhero

eBook Third Class Superhero ePub

by Charles Yu

eBook Third Class Superhero ePub
Author: Charles Yu
Language: English
ISBN: 0156030810
ISBN13: 978-0156030816
Publisher: Mariner Books; First edition (September 5, 2006)
Pages: 192
Category: Short Stories & Anthologies
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 798
Formats: azw mbr doc rtf
ePub file: 1254 kb
Fb2 file: 1479 kb

Third Class Superhero book. Charles Yu experiments with form and genre to explore the stories we tell ourselves while navigating contemporary life

Third Class Superhero book. Charles Yu experiments with form and genre to explore the stories we tell ourselves while navigating contemporary life. In "Third Class Superhero," a would- be good guy must come to terms with the darkness in his heart. A couple living in the Luxury Car Commercial subdivision in "401(k)" are disappointed when their exotic vacation turns into a Life Insurance/Asset Charles Yu experiments with form and genre to explore the stories we tell ourselves while navigating contemporary life.

Charles Yu is not for everybody. I've read both How to Survive in a Science Fictional Universe and now Third Class Superhero, and his style can put people off. The relentless interiority of the voice, plus the experimentation with form and meta-narrative, is just too much for people looking for a more conventional immersion in character and plot. Yu's quirky yet insightful short stories go much deeper than they seem on the surface. The title story's main character, Moisture Man, longs to be a successful superhero but must deal with the ambiguity of talent, good and evil when all he can do is secrete a little extra moisture out his pores.

Third Class Superhero Charles Yu A Harvest Original, HARCOURT, INC. Orlando Austin New York San Diego .

No part of this publication may be reproduced or. transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and. retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Requests for permission to make copies of any part of the work.

Charles Yu at the 2011 Texas Book Festival. Third Class Superhero (2006, Harvest Books. Charles Yu (Chinese name: You Chao-Kai/"游朝凱"; born 1976, in Los Angeles) is a Taiwanese American writer. In 2007 he was selected by the National Book Foundation as one of its "5 Under 35," a program which highlights the work of the next generation of fiction writers by asking five previous National Book Award fiction Winners and Finalists to select one fiction writer under the age of 35 whose work they find particularly promising and exciting  .

Third class superhero. by. Yu, Charles, 1976-. USB PTP Class Camera. inlibrary; printdisabled;. ark:/13960/t3sv5q900.

Charles Yu experiments with form and genre to explore the stories we tell ourselves while navigating contemporary life. A couple living in the Luxury Car Commercial subdivision in "401(k)" are disappointed when their exotic vacation turns into a Life Insurance/Asset Management pitch.

Charles Yu. 2 On that date, Wally Kushner, age seven, of Eureka, CA, achieved a point total of 1,356,888, including all bonuses. game lasting more than nine thousand rounds. In total, he played for eleven days, six hours, twenty-four minutes, and three seconds. 4 Wally's mother kept time. She also fed Wally and wiped down his face and neck with a damp washcloth. She did this twice a day, once in the morning and once in the evening

Third Class Superhero. Third Class Superhero. Download (epub, 105 Kb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Heartbreaking and hilarious, Third Class Superhero marked the debut of an author who has been a PEN award finalist, and whose novel How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe was named one of Time’s best books of the year. The post-collegiate braininess of many of Yu’s stories is like the music of the Talking Heads, making the familiar seem off-kilter.

Smart, engaging and often deadpan funny.

Charles Yu experiments with form and genre to explore the stories we tell ourselves while navigating contemporary life. In "Third Class Superhero," a would- be good guy must come to terms with the darkness in his heart. A couple living in the Luxury Car Commercial subdivision in "401(k)" are disappointed when their exotic vacation turns into a Life Insurance/Asset Management pitch. The author struggles to write the definitive biography of his mother in "Autobiographical Raw Material Unsuitable for the Mining of Fiction." In these and other stories, Yu’s characters run up against the conventions and parameters of their artificial story lines while tackling the terrifying aspects of existence: mothers, jobs, spouses, the need to express feelings.
Ffrlel
I like these stories a lot. They stay with you and are different than the average short story collection. The best one, "The Man Who Became Himself" is a must read; it deals with identity and has an obsessive and unique look at life and the question of who we are -- it made me go and find other Charles Yu stuff.

The only issue is with the Kindle version. It is not formatted very well; paragraphing is a bit messed up, weird line breaks, and the Table of Contents is practically useless since it is not clickable, making it almost impossible to navigate and jump quickly to a certain story. Inexcusable for a ten dollar e-book. That's why I'm docking one star.
Clodebd
The titular story is very good, highly enjoyable. The others are a mixed bag. Enjoy the author, especially his novel, Living in a Science Fiction Universe.
Zut
The first story was somewhat normal; all the others were like coming into the middle of a conversation and trying to figure out what the heck they were talking about. That could have been cool, but it got old really quick and became repetitive. What seemed like a neat idea at first just became the same old thing. I kept hoping for something new and interesting, but never really got it.

The only story I even remember is the Third Class Superhero.
Eigeni
Great stories to entertain and delight!
Mikale
This book is frustrating and boring beyond belief. The author has a mother problem which shows up in many of his stories, If I lived in his head I would commit suicide. His stories are frustrating and meaningless and show what an empty and cold head this man has. Don't bother to buy or rent this book unless you want to punish yourself.
Samugul
Charles Yu is not for everybody. I've read both How to Survive in a Science Fictional Universe and now Third Class Superhero, and his style can put people off. The relentless interiority of the voice, plus the experimentation with form and meta-narrative, is just too much for people looking for a more conventional immersion in character and plot. I understand and appreciate this-- its not always my cup of tea either.

But in his niche, he's a master. The stories are reflections on ambivalence, time, loss, just getting by. The fragmentary, solitary, claustrophobic self. Our inability to know each other or even ourselves. These are serious topics, as anyone who has spent much time living at the edge of these feelings knows. And while the tone of the stories is often light and amusing, they are, at core, deeply felt. These are stories with something to say.

And the form of his writing is a perfect match. Some are fragments, structurally disjoint, lists or instructions or stage directions. Often the subject is narrating and annotating and reflecting on his (almost always his) own interior monologue, replete with bullet points, capitalized phrases, paragraphs of a single short sentence, urgent banalities:

"It's never to soon to start thinking about the unthinkable," the Realtor says. He pulls out a comb and pulls it through his already-combed hair.
We don't need the Good Life. The Pretty Good Life would be just fine.
"Nice neighborhood," I try to convince my wife.

The combination of inventiveness, humor, and pathos is perfect. If this is your thing, don't miss this book.
Zinnthi
Yu's quirky yet insightful short stories go much deeper than they seem on the surface. The title story's main character, Moisture Man, longs to be a successful superhero but must deal with the ambiguity of talent, good and evil when all he can do is secrete a little extra moisture out his pores. "(401)K" makes fun of our desire to quantify everything in our lives, as well as the desire for success that is the black heart of the American dream. "The Man Who Became Himself" recognizes the gap between who we are and who we perceive ourselves to be. And "Florence" makes us realize that even after the nuclear explosion when there are just fifty people and they all live on the same planet, we'll still have the same problems relating to each other that we do now. Yu is a keen observer of the human condition; his stories are that rare combination of smart, funny, and heart-achingly true.
I'll fully admit that I picked up this book based on the nifty pop art cover, and then after flipping through it and seeing somewhat unusual typography and story structure, I took it home. The title story leads things off and is a very engaging Jonathan Lethem-style tale about "Moisture Man." He's a cut-rate superhero whose power is, as he puts it, very handy in a water-balloon fight, but that's about all. Already past his prime, to "make it", Moisture Man has to be able to fly, and there's only one way for him to do that: the dark side. It's an amusing framework for examining the compromises we all have to make in our daily lives, and easily the most enjoyable story in the book.

The other ten stories are rather precise, almost cold exercises in the craft of short story writing. While some take on imaginative frameworks, such as "Problems for Self-Study", which unfurls as a quasi-math/logic test, or the series of rules in "Two-Player Infinitely Iterated Simultaneous Semi-Cooperative Game with Spite and Reputation", they don't deviate from the central theme of identity and the quest for a meaningful existence that runs throughout the stories. In one story a couple tries to derive meaning and identity via packaged consumer goods and services, in another a man's identity literally splits in two, in another, an actor becomes overly immersed in his role, and so forth. In many of the stories, the characters aren't even given names, just "man" or "woman" or "A" or "B"... Another running theme is the idea of connection (in the E.M. Forester sense), in that many of the characters want to connect with others (family, lovers, friends), but are unable to move themselves to action. Personally, these failed to strike any kind of chord, and the navel-gazing aspect grew somewhat repetitive. Still, fans of the short form should check this out, as Yu's approach is certainly different from most of what's out there.
lind-peinture.fr
© All right reserved. 2017-2020
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
eBooks are provided for reference only