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eBook Seed Folks ePub

by Multiple voices,Paul Fleischman

eBook Seed Folks ePub
Author: Multiple voices,Paul Fleischman
Language: English
ISBN: 1883332893
ISBN13: 978-1883332891
Publisher: Audio Bookshelf; Unabridged edition (January 1, 2003)
Category: Short Stories & Anthologies
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 113
Formats: mobi rtf lit doc
ePub file: 1775 kb
Fb2 file: 1303 kb

Newbery-winning author Paul Fleischman uses thirteen speakers to bring to life a community garden's founding and first year.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Newbery-winning author Paul Fleischman uses thirteen speakers to bring to life a community garden's founding and first year. The book's short length, diverse cast, and suitability for adults as well as children have led it to be used in countless one-book reads in schools and in cities across the country. Seedfolks has been drawn upon to teach tolerance, read in ESL classes, promoted by urban gardeners, and performed in schools and on stages from South Africa to Broadway.

Award-winning writer Paul Fleischman dazzles us with this truth in Seedfolks-a slim novel that bursts with hope He was a seed folk in my mind.

Award-winning writer Paul Fleischman dazzles us with this truth in Seedfolks-a slim novel that bursts with hope. Grade 5 Up-Paul Fleischman creates a heartwarming story by weaving together a series of short vignettes about a vacant lot turned community garden. Set in a rundown section of Cleveland, Ohio, Fleischman's Seedfolks (HarperCollins, 1997) are a broad cross-section of ages, ethnic origins, and occupations. He was a seed folk in my mind.

A vacant lot, rat-infested and filled with garbage, looked like no place for a garden. Written to be read aloud by two voices-sometimes alternating, sometimes simultaneous-here is a collection of irresistible poems that celebrate the insect world, from the short life of the mayfly to the love song of the book louse. Funny, sad, loud, and quiet, each of these poems resounds with a booming, boisterous, joyful noise. In this remarkable volume of poetry for two voices, Paul Fleischman verbally re-creates the /joyful noise" of insects.

Each voice sings with the rhythm of culture and personality. The characters’ vitality and the sharply delineated details of the neighborhood make this not merely an exercise in craftsmanship or morality but an engaging, entertaining novel as well.

Newbery-winning author Paul Fleischman uses thirteen speakers to bring to life a community garden's founding and first year.

Other Books by Paul Fleischman. There were probably lots of folks who’d want to grow something, just like me. Then I studied all the trash on t. he ground. Don’t know why anyone called that lot vacant. KIM. I stood before our family altar. The garbage was piled high as your waist, some of it from the neighborhood and some dropped off by outside people. The ones who don’t want to pay at the dump, or got dangerous chemicals, or think we’re such slobs down here we won’t mind another load of junk. We can’t get City Hall to pick up our trash, but we got it delivered just fine.

Paul Fleischman's novels, poetry, picture books, and nonfiction are known for innovation and multiple viewpoints. He received the Newbery Medal for Joyful Noise: Poems for Two Voices and a Newbery Honor for Graven Images, and he was a National Book Award finalist for Breakout. His books bridging the page and stage include Bull Run, Seek, and Mind's Eye. For the body of his work, he's been the United States nominee for the international Hans Christian Andersen Award.

Using the multiple voices that made Bull Run (1995) so absorbing, Fleischman takes readers to a modern inner-city . Still, the garden becomes a place where wounds heal, friendships form, and seeds of change are sown

Using the multiple voices that made Bull Run (1995) so absorbing, Fleischman takes readers to a modern inner-city neighborhood and a different sort of battle, as bit by bit the handful of lima beans an immigrant child plants in an empty lot blossoms into a community garden, tended by a notably diverse group of local residents. Still, the garden becomes a place where wounds heal, friendships form, and seeds of change are sown. Readers won't gain any great appreciation for the art and science of gardening from this, but they may come away understanding that people can work side by side despite vastly different motives, attitudes, skills, and cultural backgrounds.

Paul Fleischman creates stories out of the most unlikely materials . He is excited about their involvement with his book and their creativity in creating their own stories, painting portraits, taking photographs an. .

Paul Fleischman creates stories out of the most unlikely materials: forgotten fragments of history, scrapbooks and obscure articles. In his 1989 Newbery acceptance speech, Fleischman states, "I write only a page or so a day; after several books it dawned on me that this was because I was writing prose that scanned, something that makes for slow progress. His scanned prose, or verse-like writing with rhythm, meter, and occasional internal rhyme, is as close as Fleischman feels he can get to composing. He is excited about their involvement with his book and their creativity in creating their own stories, painting portraits, taking photographs and writing a play.

Sometimes, even in the middle of ugliness and neglect, a little bit of beauty will bloom

Common GroundA vacant lot, rat-infested and filled with garbage, looked like no place for a garden. Especially to a neighborhood of strangers where no one seems to care. Until one day, a young girl clears a small space and digs into the hard-packed soil to plant her precious bean seeds.

City & Town Life; City and town life; Fiction; Gardens; General; Juvenile Fiction; Lifestyles; Neighborhood; Short Stories; Urban
Dilmal
Astonishing book. I am using this with my fourth and fifth-grade Drama/Language Arts/Social Studies classes and they love the book. We used it as a read-aloud book and then discussed each chapter afterward. They are begging us to read more and more of the book aloud to them. The students and teachers love the book. The 13 characters are richly drawn in short monologues that comprise each chapter. The author does not underestimate his young adult audience. He throws a lot at them and expects them to go with him on the journey that is Seedfolks. There is so much in this small and extraordinary book. I can't say enough about it. Themes of community, anti- bias, looking beyond first impressions, the power of nature to heal and nurture...the list goes on and on. I'm thinking about writing the author a note of appreciation I'm so smitten with this book. It's written for young adults but it is a book for everyone. I cannot recommend it highly enough. There is so much in it and if you trust your students, they will take you where the book leads them to go. I've taught for over 20 years and this book is one of the best books for use with work in Drama, Literacy, and Social Justice that I have had the pleasure of teaching in all of my years as a teaching artist.
Kahavor
This book is a masterpiece. Each chapter is a wonderful short story in itself, a study of individual characters and circumstances, and how they relate to the growing garden. The book is so short, yet every page is rich. Seedfolks addresses big issues like poverty, immigration, racism, and community in accessible language. I used it as a read-aloud for my 6th grade class, and students responded to the characters and stories powerfully. We were able to have honest conversations about these big, scary issues, using the book as a launching point. This is one I will keep in my library and go back to read again and again.
OCARO
No one in the neighborhood thought that a vacant lot that looks like a complete dump could have potential. Then one day a girl plants some beans and they take off. As people watch her, they follow her lead. They also plant seeds on the lot. Soon, there are all sorts of plants being grown. People get together, help each other out, and share their crops, while others are territorial with the plot they call their own. The story is told through multiple points of view of children, teenagers, and adults from all walks of life.
Uttegirazu
I didn't read it - or rather I did. I bought the book because it had been recommended for children and i thought my grandchildren (in second grade) would love talking about the characters and life. My grandkids are ferocious readers, and love being read to. This book is very good, but it is not a read for them, not even a read to. I liked the book and have it on my shelf to read it with them when they are a bit older.
Light out of Fildon
My grandparents, and my parents, read Aesop's Fables to us, and many many other easy-to-grasp Good Example Tales. THIS book, set in a slum of exhausted people, working doggedly just to survive, provides a new setting for a familiar Universal Truth: Everything you do COUNTS, one way or another. It is short, pocket-sized, simple, and CLEAR: EVERYTHING each of us does, ANYTHING we do, will be seen, and may even be copied. The little girl who clears away a tiny piece of a slum-dump-yard and PLANTS FIVE LIMA BEANS is the original angel for a slowly emerging neighborhood garden. Each little space is silently claimed by an individual who has seen hers, taken note, found some inner Hope, done the Work, and Seized the Day. Each paltry plot is personal, the fruit of Quiet but Persistent Attention - and a HUGE PERSONAL VICTORY over despair. I am giving a copy to each of our extended-family Families for my own 79th Birthday, in remembrance of our shared forebears, and in confidence for our individual lives. Plant and Cultivate your OWN Garden (although I will grow tomatoes rather than LIMA beans -- it's MY garden, after all!)
Black_Hawk_Down.
I loved this book, but after reading the 1 and 2 star reviews, I would say that it is definitely a book that will appeal more to people who are already interested in the ideas of cultural diversity and community gardening.

Some reviewers criticized the book as stereotyping ethnic groups, but I think that's a bit like saying that Huckleberry Finn is racist--maybe the representation of the dialects won't feel 100% accurate to someone who is familiar with the accent being represented, but to get hung up on that would be to miss the entire point of the book, which is that there is more to a person than his or her race.

Other reviewers criticized the fact that some rather tough issues are touched on in a book that's supposed to be for children. To that, I have to say that I am of the strong opinion that kids shouldn't be sheltered from the reality of the world; in fact, the world's cruelty often affects children in spite of our efforts to shield them from it, and to hide one's eyes from that fact only does more harm. Instead, kids should be taught that there is hope in the world in spite of the pain, and I think the book does a good job of conveying that message.
Taur
First off, this is an interesting, touching story about a working class community neighborhood coming together and creating a garden for themselves , building a stronger community in the process. If you're just a reader or an adult buying this for a child, that's reason enough to check out this book:)

If you're a teacher, though, this book is especially helpful.I have taught this book in my adult ESL classes two or three times now. It's a really great book for diverse classrooms, as it represents a lot of different cultures (Black, Guatemalan, Korean, Mexican,Vietnamese etc). "Seedfolks"' organization makes it ideal for new readers , also, since each chapter is only a few pages long, but still gives a great portrait of each character. Teachers can incorporate lots of fun outdoor activities with this as well, or just grow seeds indoors, if you are teaching more than one subject and want to tie in science or social studies.
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