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eBook We Never Talk about My Brother ePub

by Peter S. Beagle

eBook We Never Talk about My Brother ePub
Author: Peter S. Beagle
Language: English
ISBN: 189239183X
ISBN13: 978-1892391834
Publisher: Tachyon Publications (March 15, 2009)
Pages: 219
Category: Short Stories & Anthologies
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 538
Formats: azw mobi docx doc
ePub file: 1125 kb
Fb2 file: 1466 kb

12 quotes from We Never Talk about My Brother: ‘Envy nobody. Uncle Chaim and Aunt Fifke and the Angel) ― Peter S. Beagle, We Never Talk about My Brother.

12 quotes from We Never Talk about My Brother: ‘Envy nobody. It is the true secret of happiness, or at least the only one I know. Wisdom is finding joy in bewilderment ― Peter S.

I adore Peter S. Beagle's short stories even more than his full novels. These stories are surprising, quirky, and full of strange magic.

This tale is probably the closest Beagle has ever gotten to writing science fiction, and strongly reminds one of the best works of such writers as Theodore Sturgeon and Algis Budrys. I adore Peter S.

Start by marking We Never Talk about My Brother as Want to Read .

Start by marking We Never Talk about My Brother as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Inside the cover of Peter S. Beagle's short story collection We Never Talk About My Brother, there are various quotes praising his other works and his writing in general. The impression it left was that Booklist believes that dark fantasy good fantasy and the darker it is, the better.

By Moonlight" by Peter S. Beagle was named Best Novelette at the 2010 Locus Awards

By Moonlight" by Peter S. Beagle was named Best Novelette at the 2010 Locus Awards. The novelette comes from the collection We Never Talk About My BrotherModern parables of love, death, and transformation are peppered with melancholy in this extraordinary collection of contemporary fantasy. Each short story cultivates a whimsical sense of imagination and reveals a mature, darker voice than previously experienced from this legendary author.

For decades, musician and author Peter S. Beagle has been hailed as the finest living American writer of fantasy. Now Tachyon Publications has released his latest collection of stories, We Never Talk About My Brother

For decades, musician and author Peter S. Now Tachyon Publications has released his latest collection of stories, We Never Talk About My Brother. Beagle is most well known for two classic novels written at the very beginning of his career, neither of which have ever been out of print. The Last Unicorn is probably his most famous and beloved, but I feel A Fine and Private Place is the better book-a truly timeless classic.

First appeared in Orson Scott Card’s Intergalactic Medicine Show, July 2007. For Victoria and Jack Knox, Kalisa Beagle and Farhad Torkamani, Dan and Robin Beagle, my family. Mirror kingdoms: The best of peter s. beagle.

The nine extraordinary stories in Peter S. Beagle's new fantasy collection are profound . Beagle's new fantasy collection are profound explorations of love, death, transformation, and the choices that. Uncle Chaim and Aunt Rifke and the angel - We never talk about my brother - The tale of Junko and Sayuri - King Pelles the Sure - The last and only, or, Mr. Moscowitz becomes French - Spook - The stickball witch - By moonlight - The unicorn tapestries - Chandail. The novelette comes from the collection We Never Talk About My Brother. Modern parables of love, death, and transformation are peppered with melancholy in this extraordinary collection of contemporary fantasy.

Featuring the Locus Award–winning novelette, “By Moonlight”The extraordinary stories in this new contemporary fantasy collection show a mature, darker side of the author of The Last Unicorn in modern parables of love, death, and transformation shadowed lightly with melancholy. The Angel of Death enjoys newfound celebrity while moonlighting as an anchorman on the network news; King Pelles the Sure, the shortsighted ruler of a gentle realm, betrays himself in dreaming of a “manageable war”; an American librarian discovers that, much to his surprise and sadness, he is also the last living Frenchman; and rivals in a supernatural battle forgo pistols at dawn, choosing instead to duel with dramatic recitations of terrible poetry. Featuring previously unpublished stories alongside recently published classics, this is a lovely, haunting, and wholly satisfying read.
Era
It's been 2 1/2 years since Peter Beagle's last collection came out. Far too long a time! Still, here are nine stories and seven interlinked poems for the Beagle enthusiast. With the exception of the poems, all have been written since 2007 and two have never been in print before.

'Uncle Chaim and Aunt Rifke and the Angel' starts off the collection with a story about a Jewish portrait painter and the Angel who comes to be both his muse and model. The story is told by the painter's young nephew and is full of telling details, love and quiet horror.

'We Never Talk About My Brother' is one of the best stories in this collection. Two brothers have the extraordinary gift of being able to alter the world. Not change the future, mind you. If they change something than it's been this way forever, past as well as future, and the original way the world moved is simply gone. One brother dislikes the power and never uses it at all. The other brother is a newscaster and used his power to make the evening news more exciting and action-packed, in the worst of ways. This tale is probably the closest Beagle has ever gotten to writing science fiction, and strongly reminds one of the best works of such writers as Theodore Sturgeon and Algis Budrys. Still, it's completely original and an extremely fitting title story for this collection.

'The Tale Of Junko And Sayuri' deals with Japanese mythology. Junko is a good man but ambitious and he desires things that, in Japan, he could never have due to his birth status and class level. Sayuri, a shapeshifter, falls in love with him and, in human form, marries him. She sees his ambitions and will do anything, including corrupting herself, to give him those things he desires. This tale is violent, dark and tragic. It is also extremely well-written.

'King Pelles The Sure' is possibly the best story in this book. Pelles is a king, kind and good-hearted but none too wise. His kingdom is quiet and peaceful and...well, dull. To liven things up he decides to start a limited war. Just a little one, mind you, started quick and finished quicker. To his horror, he learns that there is not such a thing as a limited war, not to those in the middle of it. Pelles learns his wisdom a little too late but learn it he does. The ending to this story is quiet, sure-footed and exactly right. A real gem.

Next, Beagle moves to an avant-garde, New Yorker style tale. 'The Last And Only, or, Mr. Moscowski Becomes French' is a tale of an American librarian who slowly becomes aware that he is turning into the last genuine Frenchman. More French than any actual Frenchman could ever hope to be. This is a humorous story of sorts, although a bit black in nature, and is a demonstration of Beagle's considerable range.

A giant step away from the previous story, 'Spook' is low comedy, with Farrell--a character who's appeared in numerous Beagle stories and novels--involved in a duel with a ghost over his lady love. The duel, however, is not conducted with guns or knives or even wit. It is conducted with streams of bad--horribly bad--poetry. The real joke of this story is that ALL of the hideous poems recounted are real poems written by actual literary figures. And they are truly horrible! This reader was moved to both wincing laughter at the wrong turns the poets went down and a certain amount of pain and recrimination at Beagle for having put all those tacky poems in my head.

'The Stickball Witch' appears in print for the first time, although it appeared as a podcast last year at the Green Man Review website (there are four other brand new Beagle podcast stories there, which have NOT seen print yet, so you might want to wander over there and give a listen). Set in the early 1950s, it relates the story of a group of boys, fast friends and stickball enthusiasts all, and their encounter with the neighborhood witch. ALL neighborhoods, when you're a child, have a witch-in-residence and this particular lady is a doozy!

'By Moonlight' is brand new and tells the story of an on the run highwayman who one frostly night stumbles upon an old man and a fire. The old man takes him in, warms him, feeds him and then proceeds to tell him a story of Titania and Oberon. A tale of Tir na nOg. A tale of Fairie and a tale of wits. Wits both Fairie born and Human made. And love, of a sort and a kind. The more you think on this story, the better it is.

'The Unicorn Tapestries' are the oldest items in this book. Written in the 1970s for a never published book about the famous medieval tapestries, stored in New York, these seven linked poems are seeing their first wide exposure. They are well worth reading.

'Chandail' is another story set in the world of Beagle's fine novel THE INNKEEPER'S SONG. As told by Lal, a principal character in that novel and now well advanced in age, the chandail is a sea creature--an ugly thing that becomes more beautiful the longer you look upon it. It is a telepath of sorts, able to communicate with humans via thought pictures, although the pictures a chandail sends are often tainted by the human's own memories--and how a human understands those pictures can be quite a different thing from what the chandail intended. Lal hates the chandail, because they show her memories of things she's lost and can never regain. She regards the chandail's efforts at communication as a form of mind rape so when she comes upon a horribly injured chaidail on the beach she doesn't flee or, as the creature wishes, kill it. Instead she attempts to tow the chandail out to deep water, though whether through mercy or cruelty even she is unsure. What follows is a trip through betrayal, horror and wisdom that tells you a great deal about Lal and, possibly, a small amount about you.

Look, if you've previously read anything by Beagle, you already know this book is worth the money spent. If you're a new reader, know this. Nobody in the fantasy field today is a better, more wide-ranging or wiser writer than Peter S. Beagle. Not Charles de Lint, who provides a fine introduction to this volume. Not Neil Gaiman, who's gone out of his way to praise Beagle's work on his blog. Not J. K. Rowling. Not anybody. You're never going to be sorry you've read any of his books. You're never going to be sorry you've purchased and read *this* book. For older readers--Hallelujah! For you newest readers, who are encountering him for the first time, how I envy you. You're about to fall in love.
Daron
Short stories. Lots of them. The title story is especially enjoyable. Some of them appear in other books. Oh well.
Grarana
I loved these essay/short stories. Beagle writes with a conversational style and a variety of subject that kept me reading. I look forward to reading his other books--especially The Last Unicorn. His poem about the tapestries was just wonderful. Great reading.
the monster
I adore Peter S. Beagle's short stories even more than his full novels. These stories are surprising, quirky, and full of strange magic. Give it a read!
Xor
Beagle always delights and entertains me, even when he is writing about heart breaking subjects. He conveys the joy that is wrapped around every experience.
Vaua
Yet another great collection of short stories by one of my favorite authors. Add it to your collection!
Mash
Some of Peter Beagle's best.
I haven't read through the whole book, but each of these short stories is told in such a way that you can just wrap yourself up and inside of it. The humor of Mr. Beagle is beyond compare.
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