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eBook Passages (British Literature Series) ePub

by Ann Quin

eBook Passages (British Literature Series) ePub
Author: Ann Quin
Language: English
ISBN: 1564782794
ISBN13: 978-1564782793
Publisher: Dalkey Archive Press; 1 edition (January 1, 2003)
Pages: 112
Category: United States
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 389
Formats: mbr lrf txt lrf
ePub file: 1528 kb
Fb2 file: 1235 kb

Passages (British Literature Series). Ann Quin (1936-1973) was a British writer noted for her experimental style.

Passages (British Literature Series). 1564782794 (ISBN13: 9781564782793). The author of Berg (1964), Three (1966), Passages (1969) and Tripticks (1972), she committed suicide in 1973 at the age of 37. Quin came from a working-class family and was educated at the Convent of the Blessed Sacrament. She trained as a shorthand typist and worked in a solicitor's office, then at a publishing company Ann Quin (1936-1973) was a British writer noted for her experimental style.

A poetic book of voices, landscapes and the passing of time, Ann Quin's finely wrought novel reflects the multiple meanings of the very word passages.

A poetic book of voices, landscapes and the passing of time, Ann Quin's finely wrought novel reflects the multiple meanings of the very word "passages.

British Literature Series. By (author) Ann Quin. A poetic book of voices, landscapes and the passing of time, Ann Quin's finely wrought novel reflects the multiple meanings of the very word "passages. The form of the novel, reflecting the schizophrenia of the characters, is split into two sections-a narrative, and a diary annotated with those thoughts that provoked the entries.

Ann Quin (born 17 March 1936 in Brighton, Sussex – ? August 1973) was a British writer noted for her experimental style. In the 21st century, Stewart Home has written in admiration of her work, which remains largely overlooked, although Berg was adapted for film in 1989 as Killing Dad, starring Denholm Elliott and Richard E. Grant.

First published in 1972, British author Ann Quin's Tripticks now makes its . Quin (1936-1973) was a writer ahead of her time; 30 years later, this book still feels fresh and exciting and should win her some new fans. debut (her Passages will appear in fall 2002). Disjointed and surreal, it evokes some of the more experimental Beat writers as it tracks its narrator's trip across America. From Library Journal. The narrator of British novelist Quin's 30-year-old novel, a youngish man being tailed by his "first X-wife" and her "schoolboy gigolo," takes the reader on a long, winding road trip full of potholes and twists.

Ann Quin, one of the best kept secrets of British experimental writing, has garnered comparisons to such diverse writers as Samuel Beckett and Nathalie Sarraute. Before her death in 1973, she published four novels, including "Berg" and "Passages". In 1964 she became the first female recipient of the D. H. Lawrence Fellowship which allowed her to travel to the . a trip that provided the basis for "Tripticks". Series: British Literature.

Ann Walker, a queen stepping into her new role while grieving the death of her parents. Anne Lister, captain of the kings guard, balances her duty to the queen with dangerous feelings and a cryptic threat. Anne Lister is an ambitious FBI agent down on her luck, reassigned to eastern North Carolina.

American literature has its own Romantic period, but typically when one speaks of Romanticism, one is referring to this great and diverse age of British literature, perhaps the most popular and well-known of all literary ages. This era includes the works of such juggernauts as Wordsworth, Coleridge, William Blake, Lord Byron, John Keats, Charles Lamb, Mary Wollstonecraft, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Thomas De Quincey, Jane Austen, and Mary Shelley.

Start studying British Literature. Learn vocabulary, terms and more with flashcards, games and other study tools. Peterloo Massacre and Parliament passes six acts in response to class strife. Passage of the First Reform Bill. Drives farmers out of business and gives poor people fewer places to gather.

A poetic book of voices, landscapes and the passing of time, Ann Quin's finely wrought novel reflects the multiple meanings of the very word "passages." Two characters move through the book--a woman in search of her brother, and her lover (a masculine reflection of herself) in search of himself. The form of the novel, reflecting the schizophrenia of the characters, is split into two sections--a narrative, and a diary annotated with those thoughts that provoked the entries.

Fiarynara
My goodness, this book frightens me. The madness of the characters in this novel blankets me with edginess and discomfort. In this novel the madness is most damaging and terrifying in a way that madness described by Gogol or Dostoevsky, more absurd and existentially recognizable, is not. I cannot say if Quin's version is more accurate or less, but I will say that her version portrays some profound debilitation.
The sex resembles what a D. H. Lawrence fond of whips might devise, however the scripting is unique to Quin. Fragmentation wins the day in the prose and narrative of this novel. One is required to span the gaps of comprehension as well as one can. I found the approach rough going. There is much to be admired here though, the trickery with dreams and journals, the search for another and the unwinding of a self, the curious setting intermittently recognizable.
I remain enthralled by this writer but I find I almost need to turn aside squeamishly as I read through the violence and despair. There is absolutely nothing about the madness or haunting of the self to be romanticized or envied, but for its communication, some obscure hoorays I exspire.
snowball
With this, her 1969 third novel, Ann Quin begins to go off the rails in true 60s fashion. The formal experimentation of the previous novel "Three" was still combined with acute social observation and characterization, along with an intriguing way with plot. But in "Passages" character and plot are all but lost in the extreme fragmentation of the narrative. We appear to have a couple travelling through Greek Islands - the young man is in love with the woman and the woman is preoccupied with searching for her brother. The couple are therefore on a quest: for the brother, for each other and for themselves. This plot (and the way it disintegrates) is slightly reminiscent of Antonioni's film "L'aventura".

The narratives of the two characters are given in alternating sections, some as extracts from diaries (which harks back to "Three") and there are also, in the page margins, extracts from commentaries on Greek mythology. The narrative appears to revolve around different versions of a key episode involving a sado-masochistic orgy. The whole thing gradually blurs into a kind of stream of consciousness - appropriate since the couple get more drunk and take more drugs as the quest unravels.

Obviously "Passages" will primarily appeal to those with a taste for experimental fiction. If you like Duras (or even Woolf, Djuna B & Rhys), you won't have a problem. Personally I enjoyed this novel a lot, it's very seductive, but it's perhaps regrettable that Quin was herself so seduced by the stylistic excesses of the period and as a result her writing, like the couple's quest, was beginning to lose its way.

Note: These excellent Dalkey Archive reprints of Quin's novels are good quality, well-produced editions.
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