lind-peinture

eBook Rushes ePub

by John Rechy

eBook Rushes ePub
Author: John Rechy
Language: English
ISBN: 0394178831
ISBN13: 978-0394178837
Publisher: Grove Pr; 2nd Edition edition (May 1, 1981)
Category: United States
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 246
Formats: doc mbr mobi txt
ePub file: 1268 kb
Fb2 file: 1399 kb

A novel by. John Rechy.

A novel by. An excerpt from Rushes has previously appeared in Christopher Street magazine. Published simultaneously in Canada. Printed in the United States of America.

Once again, John Rechy takes us to an unexplored part of our world in Rushes, his first book following the controversial bestseller, The Sexual Outlaw. The story develops during a single evening and is set in a "leather and Western" bar located near the decaying and deserted waterfront of a large American city. Rushes is a tour de force. It is like peering into the gates of hell. He has given us life and literature. -Michael Bronski, presenting The Publishing Triangle's William Whitehead Lifetime Achievement Award.

Read Rushes, by John Rechy online on Bookmate – Once again, John Rechy takes us to an unexplored part of our world in Rushes, his first book following the controversial bestseller, The Sexual Outlaw.

Read Rushes, by John Rechy online on Bookmate – Once again, John Rechy takes us to an unexplored part of our world in Rushes, his first book following the controversial bestseller, The Sexual Outla. Once again, John Rechy takes us to an unexplored part of our world in Rushes, his first book following the controversial bestseller, The Sexual Outlaw. The story develops during a single evening and is set in a leather and Western bar located near the decaying and deserted waterfront of a large American city.

John Rechy takes us inside a leather and Western bar located near the deserted waterfront of a large American city. This is a sexual battlefield-a world of trucks, piers, and warehouses-depicted in Rechy’s eloquent, convincing, basically unsparing prose (Herbert Gold). A tour de force novel from the groundbreaking author of City of Night and one of the premier chroniclers of gay life in America (Los Angeles Times).

In this interview, Rechy is so brilliantly eloquent and doesn't eat his words. He gives his opinion on everything from gay marriage and monogamy, to the still very controversial S and M practices.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

New York : Grove Press : distributed by Random House. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Uploaded by abowser on November 16, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

John Francisco Rechy (born March 10, 1931) is an American novelist, essayist, memoirist, dramatist and literary critic

John Francisco Rechy (born March 10, 1931) is an American novelist, essayist, memoirist, dramatist and literary critic. In his novels, he has written extensively about gay culture in Los Angeles and wider America, among other subject matters, and is among the pioneers of modern LGBT literature. City of Night, his debut novel published in 1963, was a best seller

Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780802134974.

The action takes place in a bar near the deserted waterfront of a large American city, where the regular patrons look for compatible love, the occasional customer hopes for a quick sexual fix, and the female and transvestite hookers ply their trade
Fearlesssinger
John Rechy: sexual outlaw, leather pioneer. In RUSHES he experiences a wide swing between these emotions, simply as narrator. What was kinky in 1979 is now by most urban standards vanilla, having been appropriated (like much of queer culture) by straight women and their so-called metrosexual "boyfriends" Think for example of that dreadful Amerikkkan sit-com, "Will and Grace". Why is Grace a straight cis woman obsessed to the point of pathology with finding a man? Why is Grace not a transgender woman, bi-sexual or lesbian? And obsessed with finding a woman? Why is Will's sexuality that of a eunuch?

Making my point, John Rechy is a national treasure. Why are there no sit-coms or must-see NBC dramas about HIS books?
Arcanefist
I would basically read anything by John Rechy, any time, anywhere. He is a master at delivering characters you care about , characters you ache for, all of them, even the ones who are being cruel to other characters, and telling complex stories through the medium of explicit gay male sexuality. This story takes place in a gay bar in the late 1970's. The setting is very detailed and specific, and the only thing I regretted was that the final fates of some of the characters weren't tied up clearly at the end of the story.
Faebei
Originally read this book some time in 1980 or '81, and re-read it at least once since. Bought the e-book because I could not find my paperback copy!

Don't recall for sure, but I think my first reading was before my first visit to a gay bar. And so many times when I step into a gay bar or club I think of Mr. Rechy's descriptions of attitudes and undercurrents. Drop the S&M aspects, and his descriptions are still fairly accurate!
Thetahuginn
It was okay but not as entertaining as his other books.
Mataxe
????????????????????????
Jonide
Hoo-boy. Someone dropped a couple of John Rechy books off at McKays, NUMBERS and RUSHES. I think that CITY OF NIGHT is an amazing book, and THE COMING OF THE NIGHT campy, but with lofty pretensions, so I've always been on the lookout for Rechy's other books, so I snagged these two despite their high (for used) prices. I just finished RUSHES, which was full of such disgusting, amoral and unpleasant people, none more so than the "everyman" who centers the story with his three confederates. RUSHES was written in 1979 and is the story of an evening in a heavy S&M-themed gay bar on the piers in New York City. Of course, with any book written at the time of the events, there is no foreshadowing, so Rechy had no idea that he was capturing a moment in gay life that would soon be wiped out by the upcoming AIDS virus. His characters have all converged to this gay bar, with its' mandatory "uniform" code for, well, for what. Each character has their own agenda, to forget past lovers, to initiate the newcomers into a lifestyle or to simply feel accepted for the night. The book is presented in such punishing tones, with the cruelest barbs saved for the older (40s) man in the group, who realizes that all of those bars with signs reading 35&Under have left him to fend for himself. There are many illusions to hunters, and that is certainly an aspect to the evenings' affairs. The notion of some African tribes who sent their older men into the wild to die, with the younger tribesmen throwing stones at them if they return, is a valid argument to these people. However, after the tenth leatherman walks by and the twentieth vial of amyl is inhaled, you just want to meet a guy and share a piece of cheesecake at a diner. Edmund Wilson constantly visits this scene, but in moderation - there is no indication that these men do anything else, and sure, one could argue that Rechy is telling a particular story, but he lets his characters spout such gibberish that the reader feels that to Rechy this is the end all be all of the gay existence. The interesting thing is, is that this attitude is still prevalent, in some ways. You can still have a profile online in which there are exclusions based on age, hair type, waist size, etc. As a group we write it off to "preferences," but cruelty can still be cruel. Rechy makes some valid observations, but the revelations that he makes are spit out as homilies, not horror shows. He wants to shock us with displays of graphic sex (well, less sex and more show) while never allowing us to see his multiple protagonists engage in anything more than bitchy, BOYS IN THE BAND-lite vindictiveness. Rechy makes several references to the filth of the bar, the garbage on the floor, which is much less than the ugliness of his characters. In THE COMING OF THE NIGHT he at least has a cross-representative collection of gay men in 1983, and maybe in condemning this book for lacking that I am missing his point entirely. When most people say "I'm no prude," that actually means they are, but seriously, I'm no prude, but I found some of the wanton acts and attitudes disgusting. The only redeeming aspect of this book is the sociological sliver that this book represents, but in the wrong hands this book is a blanket indictment of homosexuals, with no positive images or characters, giving our detractors the picture they've already painted in their head.
Saintrius
"Rushes" tells the stoyr of one night spent at a seddy leather/uniform night club in an unspecified warehouse district along the waterfront. It's a dark place, filled with sexual odors, drugs, hidden faces and lusts, and dark corners wherre anything and everything could be happening. Four friends - Endore, Chas, Bill and Don - spend the evening trying to find the one person to go home with. Endore is a columnist who writes about the gay lifestyle and his belief that there is no such thing as love in the gay world; Chas views the rushes as his hunting grounds, where he is the ultimate prize; Bill wants to see how many men he can connect with but his pickiness sometimes cluds his own judgement of people; and Don is the oldest of the group, feeling his age everytime he invites himself to join his friends at the Rushes.

Each has his own insecurities which come out in full force on this particular evening. Sides are taken when a woman named Lyndy - a fashion designer - is grudginly allowed into their macho, all-male domain. Her appearance and her banter act as a catalyst between Chas and Endore, alternately setting them against on another or forcing them to join the same side. Later, a drag queen and her female companion cause a stir near the entrance to the Rushes which forces Endore to take a closer look at how gay men have been forced to find places where they can be themselves, and any intrusion into that world is angrily looked down upon. This novel also touches on ageism and the fear of the gay community with the character of Don - who feels that no one wants anything to do with him because he's slightly older; he remembers the days before clubowners put up signs such as "Under 35s Only" when everyone went out to have fun and to enjoy each others company. Sure, everyone had to keep their sexual preferences hidden for fear of the police, but nowadays, you had to creep around to avoid the violent, name-calling youths would would very easily bash in your head with fist or pipes.

To get the feel of spending the night with this group in the Rushes, author John Rechy tells the story in present time, allowing the reader to feel and to see what each character does as if he/she were with them. Also, the chapters jump from character to character, almost giving the reader a sense of the darkness, the confusion and the electric atmosphere of the place. A dark and engrossing look into the leather bar scene.
lind-peinture.fr
© All right reserved. 2017-2020
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
eBooks are provided for reference only