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eBook The Fantastic Stories of Cornell Woolrich (Alternatives) ePub

by Charles G. Waugh,Martin H. Greenberg,Professor Francis M. Nevins Jr.,Barry N. Malzberg

eBook The Fantastic Stories of Cornell Woolrich (Alternatives) ePub
Author: Charles G. Waugh,Martin H. Greenberg,Professor Francis M. Nevins Jr.,Barry N. Malzberg
Language: English
ISBN: 0809310082
ISBN13: 978-0809310081
Publisher: Southern Illinois University Press; 1st edition (September 1, 1981)
Pages: 368
Category: United States
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 108
Formats: doc lit docx txt
ePub file: 1170 kb
Fb2 file: 1745 kb

But sometimes Woolrich walked on the wild side with stories of the fantastic. The Fantastic Stories of Cornell Woolrich (1981), eds. Charles G. Waugh and Martin Greenberg is a posthumous collection of Woolrich's supernatural tales

But sometimes Woolrich walked on the wild side with stories of the fantastic. Waugh and Martin Greenberg is a posthumous collection of Woolrich's supernatural tales.

Start by marking The Fantastic Stories of Cornell Woolrich (Alternatives SF Series) as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Fantastic Stories of Cornell Woolrich (Alternatives SF Series) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Another sampler of Woolrich's, this time the whole book read (thank you ILL!) - the selection focusing on Woolrich's overlap with "fantastic" content. As might be expected, the books is full of excellent writing. I may doubt Francis Nevins Jr. assertion that Woolrich is the Edgar Allan Poe of the 20th Century but, along with being skilled, he's also a powerful writer, evidenced by the work here.

Francis M. Nevins Jr.

Cornell Woolrich’s most popular book is The Bride Wore Black. The Cornell Woolrich Omnibus: Rear Window and Other Stories, I Married a Dead Man, Waltz into Darkness by. Cornell Woolrich.

Items related to The Fantastic Stories of Cornell Woolrich (Alternatives). Cornell Woolrich first perceived his personal truth in Mexico City at the age of eight when his maternal grandfather took him to see a traveling French company perform Madame Butterfly

Items related to The Fantastic Stories of Cornell Woolrich (Alternatives). The Fantastic Stories of Cornell Woolrich (Alternatives). ISBN 13: 9780809310081. Cornell Woolrich first perceived his personal truth in Mexico City at the age of eight when his maternal grandfather took him to see a traveling French company perform Madame Butterfly. He became aware of color, drama, tragedy and that someday, like Cio-Cio-San, he would have to die. His life and his writing were filled by the sense of doom that engulfed his young mind.

1981) A collection of stories by Cornell Woolrich . This anthology contains eight of Woolrich's finest tales of horror, the supernatural and the fantastic. Superb twenty page analytical and biographical introduction by the eminent Woolrich scholar, Francis M. Nevins, Jr. Genre: Science Fiction. Used availability for Cornell Woolrich's The Fantastic Stories of Cornell Woolrich.

Cornell Woolrich first perceived his personal truth in Mexico City at the age of eight when his maternal grandfather took him to see a traveling French company perform Madame Butterfly

Cornell Woolrich first perceived his personal truth in Mexico City at the age of eight when his maternal grandfather took him to see a traveling French company perform Madame Butterfly.

The Fantastic Stories of Cornell Woolrich, Southern Illinois University . Alternative Histories: Eleven Stories of the World As It Might Have Been, Garland (New York, NY), 1986.

The Fantastic Stories of Cornell Woolrich, Southern Illinois University Press (Carbondale, IL), 1981. Exeunt Murderers: The Best Mystery Stories of Anthony Boucher, Southern Illinois University Press (Carbondale, IL), 1983. And with Charles G. Waugh) Mysterious Visions: Great Science Fiction by Masters of the Mystery, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1979. Galaxy: Thirty Years of Innovative Science Fiction, Playboy Press (Chicago, IL), 1980. And with Bernard Drew) Western Series and Sequels: A Reference Guide, Garland (New York, NY), 1986.

Malzberg frequently repurposed existing stories for his science fiction sales. He first found commercial and critical success with publication of his surreal novelette "Final War" in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction under the name K. M. O'Donnell in 1968. "Galaxy Bookshelf", Galaxy Science Fiction, October 1973, . 03. Anders, Charlie Jane (6 June 2013).

I wasn t that good you know

book by Cornell Woolrich. I wasn’t that good you know. I wasn t that good you know.

Download books for free. Greenberg, Martin H - Christmas on Ganymede and Other Stories (SS Coll). Greenberg Martin H. Скачать (PDF) . Greenberg Martin H, Waugh Charles G. Скачать (DOC). Скачать (LIT). Читать.

“I wasn’t that good you know. What I was was a guy who could write a little publishing in magazines surrounded by people who couldn’t write at all. So I looked pretty good. But I never thought I was that good at all. All that I thought was that I tried to tell the truth.”Cornell Woolrich first perceived his personal truth in Mexico City at the age of eight when his maternal grandfather took him to see a traveling French company perform Madame Butterfly. He became aware of color, drama, tragedy and that someday, like Cio-Cio-San, he would have to die. His life and his writing were filled by the sense of doom that engulfed his young mind. “I had that trapped feeling,” he wrote in his autobiography, “like some sort of a poor insect that you’ve put inside a downturned glass, and it tries to climb up the sides, and it can’t, and it can’t, and it can’t.” This keen sense of futility permeated Woolrich’s life and stories. It was his special gift to be able to portray those individ­uals who lived on the edge of disaster and who were agonizingly aware that they did so.He did so. Steve Fisher used Woolrich as model for the brutal homicide detective in his 1941 novel I Wake Up Screaming. “He had red hair and thin white skin and red eyebrows and blue eyes. He looked sick. He looked like a corpse. His clothes didn’t fit him. . . . He was possessed with a macabre humor. His voice was nasal. You’d think he was crying.”The stories gathered here and arranged chronologically by the editors—“Kiss of the Cobra,” “Dark Melody of Madness” (also known as “Papa Benjamin” and “Music from the Dark”), “Speak to Me of Death,” “I’m Dangerous Tonight,” “Guns, Gentlemen” (also known as “The Lamp of Memory” and “Twice-Trod Path”), “Jane Brown’s Body,” “The Moon of Montezuma,” and “Somebody’s Clothes—Somebody’s Life,” (also known as “Somebody Else’s Life”)—refute Woolrich’s self-assessment. He was that good.
Fhois
I like to quote Art Borgeau on Cornell Woolrich: "To read Woolrich is to take a walk on the wild side. His books exuded desperation and doom. His characters are solitary obsessives. No one has done a better job of creating powerful atmospheres of fear and suspense, using the seamy underbelly of city life as a setting" (104). Woolrich wrote largely for the pulps, but the ordinary conventions of pulp fiction couldn't contain his raw talent.

Most of Woolrich's fiction falls into the realm of crime/mystery. But sometimes Woolrich walked on the wild side with stories of the fantastic. _The Fantastic Stories of Cornell Woolrich_ (1981), eds. Charles G. Waugh and Martin Greenberg is a posthumous collection of Woolrich's supernatural tales.

There are eight tales in all: "Kiss of the Cobra" (_Dime Detective Weekly_, 1935), "Speak to Me of Death" (_Argosy_, 1937) , "I'm Dangerous Tonight" (_All-American Fiction_, 1937), "Jane Brown's Body" (_All-American Fiction_, 1938), "Dark Melody of Madness" (_Dime Mystery Magazine_, 1935), "Guns, Gentlemen" (_Argosy_, 1937), "Moon of Montezuma" (_Fantastic_, 1952), and "Somebody's Clothes-- Somebody's Life" (_Fantasy and Science Fiction_, 1958). The last four tales appeared in an earlier paperback collection, _Beyond the Night_ (1958), though "Guns, Gentlemen" and "Dark Melody..." appeared in altered forms and titles. The first four tales never appeared in _Beyond the Night_. "Jane Brown's Body" was reprinted in _Fantasy and Science Fiction_ in 1951, and "I'm Dangerous Tonight" was reprinted in _Fantasy Story_ in 1950. "Jane Brown's Body" was previously reprinted in book form. "I'm Dangerous Tonight" was not.

Far and away the best story in the collection is the novella," Jane Brown's Body," which updates the Frankenstein story into the "modern" world of airplanes, speakeasies, and gangsters. It is memorable for its driving, poetic, present-tense narration that will hook you in the first paragraph, its lovely heroine, back from the dead, its tough-talking Irish hero, and its shocking (but utterly logical) ending.

Two other stories in the collection are tales told in the present tense. (Modern short story writers glut the market with such tales, nowadays, but Woolrich was doing them long before they were fasionable.) One of the stories is "Dark Melody of Madness" (aka, "Music from the Dark"). It's the one about the New Orleans jazz musician, doomed by the curse of a voodoo witch doctor. My wife and I recently visited New Orleans for the first time-- with its old buildingswith wooden shutters and iron loggias, its ghost and voodoo tours, its street musicians, and its ancient cemetaries with their crypts. It made rereading this story a bit more sharp and vivid.

The remaining present tense story is "Kiss of the Cobra". It is set in Los Angeles, but the villainess of the piece is a sinister, serpentine woman from India who has...pets. The actual plot of the tale veers into the fantastic. But the sheer awfulness of the woman and her eventual comeuppance will keep you glued to the story.

"Somebody's Clothes-- Somebody's Life" is another experiment in style. This one is in the form of a play. It is set at the Biaritz and is about a woman who could not win at the gaming tables and a girl who could not win at life. Both miss their shots at redemption...or do they?

The remaining four tales are not told in an overtly experimental style. But they are told in a driving, noirish style of writing that is likely to stick in your mind. "Guns, Gentlemen," is another New Orleans tale. it is about a young man of modern times whose ancestral hero worship takes him back to the olden days of gentlemanly duels by the bayou-- with unfortunate results.

"Speak to Me of Death," is, I believe, an early version of _ Night Has a Thousand Eyes_. The young niece of a millionaire tells a detective of how a man with apparent clairvoyance has predicted that her uncle will die on a certain date at midnight "in the jaws of a lion". Can he be saved?

Woolrich is quoted as saying of himself: "I wasn't that good, you know. What I was was a guy who could write a little publishing in magazines surrounded by people who couldn't write at all" (352). One of his later tales, "The Moon of Montezuma," appeared in the same issue of _Fantastic_ as Mickey Spillane's "The Veiled Woman". I will spare you any quotes from the Spillane, but here is Woolrich:

The girl peered out from the car. Her hair was blond, her skin fair. She looked unreal in these surroundings of violent color; somehow completely out of key with them. She was extremely tired-looking; there were shadows under her blue eyes. She was holding a very young baby wrapped in a little cone-shaped blanket. A baby not more than a few weeks old. And beside the collar of her coat a rosebud was pinned. Scarcely opened, yet dying already. Red as a glowing coal. Or a drop of blood. (278)

This tale of the doomed young girl and her baby in Mexico is not simply better than the Spillane. It is _that good_.

You may remember Woolrich stories for their style, for their characters, for their suspense... or for their settings. Woolrich had actually been to most of the places that he wrote about, and he is usually able to make most of his settings come to life. New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles, Havana, Mexico, New Orleans... and Paris. A logical place for the devil to emerge. And so he does in "I'm Dangerous Tonight". The plot (which becomes rather lengthly and convoluted) involves a diabolic dress which turns the women who wear it into vessels of insane, murderous evil. This blends rather uncomfortably with a plot involving drugs and Paris apaches.

The collection contains an excellent and informative critical introduction by Francis M. Nevins and a passably good appreciative Afterward by Barry Malzberg.

_Reference:_ Borgeeau, Art.. _The Mystery Lovers' Companion_. New York: Crown, 1986.
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