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eBook Simone De Beauvoir And Jean-paul Sartre: The Remaking Of A Twentieth-century Legend ePub

by Kate Fullbrook

eBook Simone De Beauvoir And Jean-paul Sartre: The Remaking Of A Twentieth-century Legend ePub
Author: Kate Fullbrook
Language: English
ISBN: 0465078273
ISBN13: 978-0465078271
Publisher: Basic Books; First Edition edition (February 15, 1994)
Pages: 224
Category: World Literature
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 623
Formats: lrf docx lrf doc
ePub file: 1176 kb
Fb2 file: 1932 kb

No book on Beauvoir or Sartre has led to so much discussion, provoked such consternation or so changed the way we see these cultural icons as has Kate and Edward Fullbrook's "Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre: The Remaking of a Twentieth-Century Legend"

No book on Beauvoir or Sartre has led to so much discussion, provoked such consternation or so changed the way we see these cultural icons as has Kate and Edward Fullbrook's "Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre: The Remaking of a Twentieth-Century Legend". The basis of this recently republished book (which I had the pleasure of rereading last week) is disarmingly simple.

Start by marking Simone De Beauvoir And Jean Paul Sartre .

Start by marking Simone De Beauvoir And Jean Paul Sartre: The Remaking Of A Twentieth Century Legend as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Read by Kate Fullbrook.

In writing his acclaimed Being and Nothingness, Sartre acted primarily as an interpreter of a philosophical system already worked out in Beauvoir's novel, She Came To Stay.

Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre The Remaking of a 20th-Century Legend By Kate . The evidence the Fullbrooks present to prove this supposed act of philosophical theft is decidedly spotty at best.

Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre The Remaking of a 20th-Century Legend By Kate Fullbrook and Edward Fullbrook 214 pages. They make no effort to situate "Being and Nothingness" in context with Sartre's readings in Heidegger and Husserl, or with his own earlier writings, and they completely ignore the many autobiographical echoes in the text. Instead, their strategy is to try to inflate the philosophical import of Beauvoir's novel to ludicrous proportions.

Bibliographic Details. The only problem, Kate and Edward Fullbrook argue, is that it is wrong.

Bibliographic Details Publisher: Basic Books, New York, NY, . Publication Date: 1994. The book shows that both intellectually and sexually, de Beauvoir led and Sartre followed. Welcome to Kennedy Books.

Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Introduction. 10 Simone de Beauvoir's Marguerite as a Possible Source of Inspiration for Jean-Paul Sartre's The Childhood of a Leader. Eliane Lecarme-Tabone - 2009 - In Christine Daigle & Jacob Golomb (ed., Beauvoir and Sartre: The Riddle of Influence. Indiana University Press. pp. 180. Two Interviews with Simone de Beauvoir. Simone De Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons & Jane Marie Todd - 1989 - Hypatia 3 (3):11 - 27. La Ceremonie des Adieux, Suivi de Entretiens Avec Jean-Paul Sartre, Aout-L.

Manufacturer: Basic Books Release date: 31 January 1995 ISBN-10 : 0465078281 ISBN-13: 9780465078288. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Fullbrook, . & Fullbrook, E. (1993). Cite this entry as: Marshall J. (2015) Beauvoir and Philosophy of Education. In: Peters M. (eds) Encyclopedia of Educational Philosophy and Theory. Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre: The remaking of a twentieth century legend. Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf. Situation and human existence: Freedom, subjectivity and society. Simone de Beauvoir: Writing the self. Westport/London: Praeger. Feminist interpretations of Simone de Beauvoir.

Argues that de Beauvoir, not Sartre, was the dominant partner in their relationship
Whitebinder
The surprise of this book is the extensive myth-making engaged in by Simone de Beauvoir in regard to the founding of French existentialist theory. It would seem that as school examiners noted, she was the better philosopher of the two, and it was she who devised existentialism in her novel SHE CAME TO STAY.
The cat was out of the bag, so to speak, when the war journals of Sartre were published just after his death. Simone de Beauvoir did some fast jockeying of dates which was not totally convincing to her biographer, these authors write. It would seem that she had gotten so used to the falsities presented to the world she could not bear to have the truth revealed, even when the truth was complimentary to her.
It is necessary to understand how revolutionary she was when she began writing in the 1930's and took the position that for the sake of freedom she must refuse the offer of marriage given to her by Sartre. It turns out that he was a very good at articulating the philosophy the couple devised. False stories did more than cover up de Beauvoir's evident orginality, they also covered up her sexual adventures which could have been misconstrued by the public in general.
The book is a delight. The writers give full praise to previous biographers. It is comforting to learn some truths since the myth-making did strike this reader as far-fetched. Nonetheless, one is left with a nagging sense that surely if philosophers fail to tell the truth, should not this mean that their works be taken less seriously.
Onaxan
No book on Beauvoir or Sartre has led to so much discussion, provoked such consternation or so changed the way we see these cultural icons as has Kate and Edward Fullbrook's "Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre: The Remaking of a Twentieth-Century Legend". The basis of this recently republished book (which I had the pleasure of rereading last week) is disarmingly simple. The Fullbrooks checked out Beauvoir's and Sartre's newly-available letters and diaries and found that the traditional story that says the Beauvoir constructed her first novel "She Cme to Stay" on the basis of philosophical ideas she took from Sartre's essay "Being and Nothingness" is the exact opposite of the truth. Sartre only began, the Fullbrooks carefully document, to compile notes hor his philosophical treatise after studying the second draft of Beauvoir's novel. The Fullbrooks also, and again drawing on the letters, make the case that it was Beauvoir's sexual promiscuity, rather than Sartre's that initially dictated the famous open terms of their 50-year relationship. All this radical post-patriarchal revisionism, which the Fullbrooks refused to play down, was too much for many critcs when this book appeared in 1994. Some reviewers were apoplectic, others deeply sceptical, and the "New Yorl Times" twice ran long reviews warning their readers against this "feminist claptrap". But in fact the Fullbrooks, in claiming philosophical originality for Beauvoir, were themselves not so original as perhaps they and certainly their critics imagined. Margaret Simons, Linda Singer and Sonia Kruks had previously argued the case for Beauvoir as an innovative philosopher and the source of some of Sartre's later ideas. The Fullbrooks' discoveries gave new significance to this prior scholarship and inspired Simons to go off in search of Beauvoir's student diaries. (See Simons 1999) Simons's subsequent discoveries and the slow but continuing cultural shift away from presuming that women are never the source of original ideas has taken away some of the shock value of the Fullbrooks' first book. Indeed, seven years on and their impressive scholarship has never been seriously challanged. By now scores of Sartre scholars much have checked out the letters and diaries and found, to their dismay, that the Fullbrooks did not make any of it up. But although "Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre: The Remaking of a Twentieth-Century Legend" through its success no longer enjoys the controversy it once did, it remains, with its compelling narrative and writerly qualities, one of the best books evr written about either Beauvoir or Sartre. Even the "New York Times" had to admit that it was good read. For capturing the spirit of these twentieth-century giants and their extraordinary relationship, this book is yet to be beaten.
Virn
"Political correctness" has made it difficult to challenge even that part of the thesis of the Fullbrooks' book, Simone De Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre: The Remaking of a Twentieth-Century Legend, which relates strictly to the history of philosophy. Nevertheless, challenged it must be, and has been, contrary to the claims of Sharon Wright in her online review. What she calls their "impressive scholarship" has come under serious and precise attack from a number of quarters. What follows is simply the lead-in to an article that I myself published as early as 1995 ("Sartre and Beauvoir: Refining rather than 'Remaking' the Legend", Simone de Beauvoir Studies, vol. 12, 1995, pp. 91-99); the rest of that article goes on to justify my claims in detail.
"The crux of their argument is the assertion that Sartre's reading of the draft of L'Invitée during his leave in Paris between 4 and 16 February 1940 was what provided him with all or most of the crucial ideas that were to form the substance of L'Etre et le Néant. [...] Now, there are least four MAJOR flaws in this line of argument: (i) we do not know with certainty exactly what was in the parts of L'Invitée that Sartre read in February 1940; (ii) the argument ignores completely Beauvoir's acquaintance with drafts of Sartre's L'Age de raison, and also seriously underplays the philosophical content of those of Sartre's Carnets de la drôle de guerre that Beauvoir had read before February 1940; (iii) we DO know that Sartre had been working since the mid-1930s on the ideas that were to be central to L'Etre et le Néant; (iv) the momentous philosophical system that the Fullbrooks ascribe to Beauvoir is simply not to be found in even the final version of L'Invitée."
Since, as Sharon Wright points out, the Fullbrooks were far from the first to argue for the philosophical originality of Beauvoir, those of their claims that are demonstrably false have done nothing to promote this case. Rather, they have tended to obscure, and direct attention away from, many of the complex and fascinating questions concerning the relationship between the thought of Beauvoir and that of Sartre. What is more, some of the sensationalist, journalistic features of the style of the book have served to inflame sensitive issues that require particularly cool, rational treatment.
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