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eBook The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl: How Two Brave Scientists Battled Typhus and Sabotaged the Nazis ePub

by Arthur Allen

eBook The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl: How Two Brave Scientists Battled Typhus and Sabotaged the Nazis ePub
Author: Arthur Allen
Language: English
ISBN: 039308101X
ISBN13: 978-0393081015
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1 edition (July 21, 2014)
Pages: 400
Category: Medicine
Subcategory: Medical
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 501
Formats: rtf doc lrf mbr
ePub file: 1710 kb
Fb2 file: 1678 kb

And sabotaged the nazis. W. norton & company. Weigl and Fleck thus found themselves fighting on two fronts.

And sabotaged the nazis. The Third Reich kept them alive because it needed their expertise on typhus, but in keeping them alive, the Nazis could not stop them from helping others. Fleck and Weigl found the calm to practice medical science-and to sabotage the goals of the oppressor. For their German bosses, meanwhile, the fight against typhus became a theater of medicine gone wrong. But there were degrees of wrongness and moral failure. Weigl’s boss was a pragmatic army doctor, Hermann Eyer.

Describes the true story of how the eccentric Polish scientist tasked by the Nazis to create a typhus vaccine .

Describes the true story of how the eccentric Polish scientist tasked by the Nazis to create a typhus vaccine hid the intelligentsia from the Gestapo by hiring them to work in his laboratory. How two brave scientists battled typhus and sabotaged the Nazis. Allen, Arthur, 1959-. Lice, war, typhus, madness City on the edge of time The louse feeders The Nazi doctors and the shape of things to come War and epidemics Parasites The fantastic laboratory of Dr. Wiegl Armies of winter The terrifying clinic of Dr. Ding "Paradise" at Auschwitz Buchenwald : rabbit stew and fake vaccine Imperfect justice.

And no one who has lived through a typhus epidemic will ever forget it. The disease is transmitted by tiny arthropods that live snugly in the seams of warm clothing, which they do not leave, unless evicted, except to suck blood or-when the body they occupy has gone cold, or too hot with fever-to find a new human host

Weigl did work for the Nazis and Portions of this book are quite fascinating. This book provides an over view of the history of Typhus. The author goes into more detail of the typhus epidemics of WWI and WWII

Weigl did work for the Nazis and Portions of this book are quite fascinating. The description of the symptoms and epidemiology of Typhus as of Weigl's method of developing a vaccine are lucid and of considerable interest. Allen is especially interested in the r Ludwick Fleck who worked for Weigl for a time. Allen's treatment of Fleck's ideas is superficial and unfortunately he adopts Fleck's term 'thought collective' as a buzz word that he uses often in unenlightening ways. The author goes into more detail of the typhus epidemics of WWI and WWII. Some scientists call typhus the war disease.

Friday, February 2, 2018. Typhus is a disease of crowded conditions like refugee camps, ghettos, and for the great concern of the Germans, in their army on the Eastern Front. The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl: How Two Brave Scientists Battled Typhus and Sabotaged the Nazis by Arthur Allen - 2012. Weigl: How Two Brave Scientists Battled Typhus and Sabotaged the Nazis by Arthur Allen is a fascinating book.

And we learn how Fleck fooled the Nazis by producing a vaccine he knew did nothing, while at the same time making a. .Both Weigl and Fleck were Polish scientists

And we learn how Fleck fooled the Nazis by producing a vaccine he knew did nothing, while at the same time making a real vaccine for laboratory workers and prisoners. Both Weigl and Fleck were Polish scientists.

The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr Weigl How Two Brave Scientists Battled Typhus and Sabotaged the Nazi.

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Weigl's laboratory became a centre of intellectual activity and resistance

Weigl's laboratory became a centre of intellectual activity and resistance.

PDF On Nov 1, 2015, Chong-Gee Teo and others published The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl: How . When the First World. War broke, Weigl, stationed nearby to lead a laboratory to. control typhus among Russian prisoners of war, recruited. Fleck, then a student.

When the First World. Rickettsia prowazekii had just been identied as the.

From a laboratory in wartime Poland comes a fascinating story of anti-Nazi resistance and scientific ingenuity.

Few diseases are more gruesome than typhus. Transmitted by body lice, it afflicts the dispossessed―refugees, soldiers, and ghettoized peoples―causing hallucinations, terrible headaches, boiling fever, and often death. The disease plagued the German army on the Eastern Front and left the Reich desperate for a vaccine. For this they turned to the brilliant and eccentric Polish zoologist Rudolf Weigl.

In the 1920s, Weigl had created the first typhus vaccine using a method as bold as it was dangerous for its use of living human subjects. The astonishing success of Weigl’s techniques attracted the attention and admiration of the world―giving him cover during the Nazi’s violent occupation of Lviv. His lab soon flourished as a hotbed of resistance. Weigl hired otherwise doomed mathematicians, writers, doctors, and other thinkers, protecting them from atrocity. The team engaged in a sabotage campaign by sending illegal doses of the vaccine into the Polish ghettos while shipping gallons of the weakened serum to the Wehrmacht.

Among the scientists saved by Weigl, who was a Christian, was a gifted Jewish immunologist named Ludwik Fleck. Condemned to Buchenwald and pressured to re-create the typhus vaccine under the direction of a sadistic Nazi doctor, Erwin Ding-Schuler, Fleck had to make an awful choice between his scientific ideals or the truth of his conscience. In risking his life to carry out a dramatic subterfuge to vaccinate the camp’s most endangered prisoners, Fleck performed an act of great heroism.

Drawing on extensive research and interviews with survivors, Arthur Allen tells the harrowing story of two brave scientists―a Christian and a Jew― who put their expertise to the best possible use, at the highest personal danger.

35 illlustrations
Phobism
We always hear that disease kills more soldiers than bullets, and the king of battlefield diseases was typhus, passed along by body lice. Weigl was a Pole of German descent. Fleck was an imprisoned Jewish scientist. Both were working on vaccines for typhus. The book describes the work they did on vaccines for the Nazis, and how they risked their lives to save those interned in the Nazi Ghettos and camps - primarily Buchenwald and Auschwitz. And we learn how Fleck fooled the Nazis by producing a vaccine he knew did nothing, while at the same time making a real vaccine for laboratory workers and prisoners. As well, the experiments done by Weigl and Fleck initiated the post war discussion and codification of how human trials should be conducted. This book, as one would expect, is full of sharp edges. The descriptions of the camps and conditions, as well as the Nazi regime in general, are shocking, detailed, and graphic.
Grokinos
I had sheilded myself my whole life from any more detail of the holocaust than I had to have, because it is so painful.
This book allowed me to bear witness to the attitudes and events that led up to the holocaust in a way that made it bearable, even rewarding to know about.
Typhus. Even though I'm a nurse, I had NO idea that this dramatic disease existed and was spread by human body lice!
Hatred, fear & inhumane policies that came from them literally exacerbated the occurance and spread of the very disease they were afraid of.
It was revealing to read the attitudes and the rhetoric regarding Poles, Jews and Gypsies because they sound eerily familiar to today's anti-poor, anti-refugee & anti-immigrant rhetoric.
I learned about Ludwig Fleck who had a shrewed mind for how science works and was ahead of his time.
There is irony that is not lost on me that a vaccine could have an effect on the outcome of a world war - both in terms of providing false vaccine to Nazi troops which failed to protect them from loss of lives, as well as providing real vaccines to those held captive in slums and camps (and to people who were tending to the sick in those areas). With today's anti-vaccine beliefs, this reality is a hard hitting example of what vaccines really do.

It was hard at times to follow the stories in the book because it jumped around to talk about different people, and to some extent also jumped around in time, plus there are a lot of names! But it was not bad enough that I couldn't follow nor did it diminsh my appreciation for larger story being told.
Truly Amazing book.
Narder
It's really interesting to read books about individuals who put their own lives at risk in horrendous conditions such as The Holocaust, in order to save the lives of others. Typhus was a killer of people before, and during World War 2. It was a massive killer in World War I. Everyone in the world was frantically looking for something that would prevent people from getting typhus. The Nazis were less worried about even their own people, then they were about keeping their killing machine alive.

Both Weigl and Fleck were Polish scientists. Weigl had been working on a Typhus vaccination before the war started, and Fleck was also involved in Weigl's lab. It is amazing the amount of good science that they managed to do during a time of hardship, when the normal and up-to-date science equipment that was available at the time was probably hard to get. Weigl and Fleck used their labs as opportunities to save the lives of others, by putting them to work in their labs. Many of the people that were saved were other Jewish scientists...and many of them were put to use as 'feeders' of the lice that would be used to create the vaccines. This whole story is kind of cringe-worthy at that point, but you can understand how it needed to be done to save lives.

Weigl and Fleck created real vaccine for those who needed it, such as in the ghettos (which were perfect places for diseases like Typhus to incubate). But their vaccines for the German troops were missing vital pieces of vaccine engineering that would make them work. It amazes me sometimes, when you think of the Nazis' gullibility. Here they were killing Jews and various other groups, including French soldiers, and they expected the Jews who were working for them to produce a vaccine for Nazis. I don't know how much more obtuse they could have been for thinking the vaccines were safe. Of course, they were not scientists...and that is always a problem when politicians get involved in things they don't understand (as we are seeing with global climate change).

The book was very interesting, but the writing was a little confusing in parts. But I very much appreciated both the story of these men who should be recognized far more than what they were during the life times. I also enjoyed the science behind all of this...incredible story.
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