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eBook The Invention of Cuneiform: Writing in Sumer ePub

by Zainab Bahrani,Marc van Van De Mieroop,Jean-Jacques Glassner

eBook The Invention of Cuneiform: Writing in Sumer ePub
Author: Zainab Bahrani,Marc van Van De Mieroop,Jean-Jacques Glassner
Language: English
ISBN: 0801887577
ISBN13: 978-0801887574
Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press; y First edition edition (October 18, 2007)
Pages: 288
Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 479
Formats: mobi rtf doc docx
ePub file: 1550 kb
Fb2 file: 1236 kb

Jean-Jacques Glassner, a French Assyriologist, titled this book "The Invention of Cuneiform: Writing in. .The book's title would clearly lead one to believe that this book is going to be about the development of writing in Sumer.

Jean-Jacques Glassner, a French Assyriologist, titled this book "The Invention of Cuneiform: Writing in Sumer. Although this book was written by him in French, the translated title is an exact translation of the French. That is not what this book focuses on. The first indication of this is in the translators' preface, where they write "It is perhaps better to call Glassner's work a genealogy of writing, rather than a history, seeking writing's antecedents, rather than its origins.

Similar books and articles. Marc Van De Mieroop - 1994 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 87:501-501. Before Writing, Vol. I: From Counting to Cuneiform by Denise Schmandt-Besserat. Zainab Bahrani - 1992 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 112 (2):327-328. Signes d'écriture et classification: L'exemple des Ovi-Caprinés. Jean-Jacques Glassner - forthcoming - Topoi. Jean-Jacques Glassner - 1990 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 110 (4):760-761. The Graven Image Representation in Babylonia and Assyria. Zainab Bahrani - 2003.

Jean-Jacques Glassner, a French Assyriologist, titled this book "The Invention of Cuneiform: Writing in.

Chicago Distribution Center. Kevin McGeough, "The Invention of Cuneiform: Writing in Sumer by Jean-Jacques Glassner, Zainab Bahrani, and Marc van de Mieroop," Near Eastern Archaeology 68, no. 3 (September 2005): 135-136. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. ISIS, Heritage, and the Spectacles of Destruction in the Global Media. First Israel, Core Israel, United (Northern) Israel.

oceedings{Mcgeough2005TheIO, title {The Invention of Cuneiform: Writing in Sumer. Jean-Jacques Glassner, Zainab Bahrani, and Marc van de Mieroop. author {Kevin M. Mcgeough}, year {2005} }. Kevin M. Mcgeough.

In The Invention of Cuneiform Jean-Jacques Glassner offers a.

In The Invention of Cuneiform Jean-Jacques Glassner offers a compelling introduction to this seminal era in human history. Unfortunately, this book barely discusses the stated topic at all. Let me start out by saying that the translators, both Assyriologists at Columbia University, did a superb job in translating this book into English.

The first part of the book focuses on the contribution of writing to the state's legitimating project.

22, xviii+417 p. ills. The first part of the book focuses on the contribution of writing to the state's legitimating project.

22, xviii+417 p. Published: 19 October 2005. by Cambridge University Press (CUP). in Cambridge Archaeological Journal. Cambridge Archaeological Journal, Volume 15, pp 275-280; doi:10.

Marc Van De Mieroop, professor, is a specialist of the history of the ancient Near East from the beginning of writing to.Jean-Jacques Glassner, The Invention of Cuneiform. Writing in Sumer (with Zainab Bahrani), 2003.

Marc Van De Mieroop, professor, is a specialist of the history of the ancient Near East from the beginning of writing to the age of Alexander of Macedon. Besides teaching at Columbia University, he has taught at the University of Oxford and at Yale University. Mario Liverani, Myth and Politics in Ancient Near Eastern Historiography (with Zainab Bahrani), 2004. Mario Liverani, Uruk: The First City (with Zainab Bahrani), 2006.

As the first known system of writing, the cuneiform symbols traced in Sumerian clay more than six millennia ago were once regarded as a simplistic and clumsy attempt to record in linear form the sounds of a spoken language. More recently, scholars have acknowledged that early Sumerian writing—far from being a primitive and flawed mechanism that would be "improved" by the Phoenicians and Greeks—in fact represented a complete written language system, not only meeting the daily needs of economic and government administration, but also providing a new means of understanding the world.

In The Invention of Cuneiform Jean-Jacques Glassner offers a compelling introduction to this seminal era in human history. Returning to early Mesopotamian texts that have been little studied or poorly understood, he traces the development of writing from the earliest attempts to the sophisticated system of roughly 640 signs that comprised the Sumerian repertory by about 3200 B.C. Glassner further argues—with an occasional nod to Derrida—that the invention of writing had a deeper metaphysical significance. By bringing the divinely ordained spoken language under human control, Sumerians were able to "make invisibility visible," separating themselves from the divine order and creating a new model of power.

Castiel
Jean-Jacques Glassner, a French Assyriologist, titled this book "The Invention of Cuneiform: Writing in Sumer." Although this book was written by him in French, the translated title is an exact translation of the French. Unfortunately, this book barely discusses the stated topic at all.

Let me start out by saying that the translators, both Assyriologists at Columbia University, did a superb job in translating this book into English. They both performed admirably at translating Glassner's often obtuse, hyper-literary style of French. There were only a few times in the book that I could "feel" that the sentence was translated.

However, other than the translation, I must agree with the other reviewers that this book is not going to prove useful or interesting to most, unless you are a French Assyriologist. The book's title would clearly lead one to believe that this book is going to be about the development of writing in Sumer. That is not what this book focuses on. The first indication of this is in the translators' preface, where they write "It is perhaps better to call Glassner's work a genealogy of writing, rather than a history, seeking writing's antecedents, rather than its origins." Sadly, there is more in here about philosophy than about Sumerian cuneiform.

Glassner seems to write only for an audience of his fellow French Assyriologists. Indeed, his style is very similar to that of his colleague Jean Bottero. While the book should be about Mesopotamian writing and its origins, he spends more time discussing linguistic theory and philosophy than anything else. If you are not familiar with de Saussure, Derrida, and Foucault, as well as a general background in linguistics and particularly French linguistic philosophy, do not bother reading this book. Glassner also assumes that you are familiar with the classics and French literature. I often had the impression that the author wanted to impress us by showing us just how much he knows, regardless of how relevant a statement is to the topic.

To label the different cuneiform syllables that represent the same phoneme Assyriologists use super and subscripts, as well as lower and upper case letters. However, Glassner bizarrely does not discuss this at all. He routinely makes a statement, and then fails to follow it with any discussion or justification.

There appears to have been no serious editing of the book, nor any attempt to make this book more accessible to an audience of those who aren't Assyriologists with training in French linguistic philosophy.

The book appears to have had no serious editing or other work done on it to make it more readable or accessible to non-specialists. Unfortunately, there is little available for the non-specialist in Assyriology. While there are many books for non-specialists on, for example, Greco-Roman studies, Mesoamerican studies, and Egyptology, sadly there is little for the lay audience in Assyriology.

I strongly recommend that you do not spend your time or money on this book.
Ffel
This book is one of the best books that I have read on this subject. The author is very detailed and goes into the subject on a very knowledgable level. Being a Sumerian specialist myself I was very challenged in some of his comments as well as very excited to learn even more and recommend this book if you want to be accepted into academic circles as being well read. I found the content to be right on, there is not too much disucssion of theory and philosophical ideals. You may wonder, is it necessary? Yes, reading and writing are philosophical exercises and discussion of those issues are a must if you want to truly gain an appreciation of what was accomplished by the Sumerians. I highly recommend this work and I hope you will read it for yourself. I checked out my copy from the local library and I am looking for a good, cheap copy to permanently add to my library of Sumerian / Near Eastern books.
Sarin
Most people seem pretty disappointed by this book; on the other hand, I am very satisfied with this book: Before Writing, Volume I: From Counting to Cuneiform, by Denise Schmandt-Besserat. It refutes the very thesis that cuneiform developed out of nothing, instead, her theory is that it developed "from an archaic counting device." The foreword is by an eminent Assyriologist, and there's a volume II which is basically all the data (pictures of counting tokens), so the reader can judge for themself. If that weren't enough, she also wrote "'How Writing Came About' [which] draws material from both volumes to present Schmandt-Besserat's theory for a wide public and classroom audience. Based on the analysis and interpretation of a selection of 8,000 tokens or counters from 116 sites in Iran, Iraq, the Levant, and Turkey, it documents the immediate precursor of the cuneiform script." Anyone interested in this topic should be satisfied...
Kamick
The title of the book should be "Writing in Sumer before the invention of cuneiform". The author's erudition shows everywhere in this book, however, the text is much too chatty and I found it extremely tedious (and I am very interested in the topic). At half its length it would have been too long. Trivialities are being treated in epic detail. Many statements are obscure and unsupported by evidence. Because of my deep interest I read the whole book, but it was a waste of time. It seems that I had to give it one star, but I would have preferred to rate it with no stars.
Kagalkree
I put this book at the top of my wish list, hoping to find in it a history of the development of writing in Sumer and a description of how the writing system operates. Instead I found a long-winded, repetitive discussion in the French philosophical tradition of the nature of reality and whether writing is a "different language" than speaking. More than half the book is spent deriding other French authors. The main thesis of the book, delivered with great rhetorical finesse and little or no evidence, is that writing did not develop gradually but was "invented" suddenly as a full-blown system.
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