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eBook The Moguls and the Dictators: Hollywood and the Coming of World War II ePub

by David Welky

eBook The Moguls and the Dictators: Hollywood and the Coming of World War II ePub
Author: David Welky
Language: English
ISBN: 0801890446
ISBN13: 978-0801890444
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press; 1 edition (January 12, 2009)
Pages: 448
Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 521
Formats: txt rtf azw mbr
ePub file: 1174 kb
Fb2 file: 1732 kb

In this fresh look at moviemaking during the Great Depression, David Welky examines Hollywood’s response to the rise of fascism and the beginning of the Second World War. Through innovative analysis of hundreds of movies-including The Dawn Patrol, G. .

In this fresh look at moviemaking during the Great Depression, David Welky examines Hollywood’s response to the rise of fascism and the beginning of the Second World War. Through innovative analysis of hundreds of movies-including The Dawn Patrol, Goodbye, Mr. Chips, and Sergeant York-Welky traces the shifting motivations and arguments of the film industry, politicians, and the public as they negotiated how-or whether-the silver screen should portray Nazism, depict conflict overseas, promote Americanism, and support President Roosevelt’s rearmament efforts.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Moguls and the Dictators: Hollywood and the Coming of World War II as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

David Welky is an assistant professor of history at the University of Central Arkansas, the author of Everything Was Better in America: Print Culture and the Great Depression, and coauthor of Charles A. Lindbergh: The Power and Peril of Celebrity.

That is the fundamental question raised in David Welky's new book, The Moguls and The Dictators: Hollywood .

That is the fundamental question raised in David Welky's new book, The Moguls and The Dictators: Hollywood and the Coming of World War II. An assistant professor of history at the University of Central Arkansas, Welky examines the making of American films in the 1930s and early 1940s and the struggle of the studios to balance the forces of commercialism, ideology and prevailing public opinion.

In this fresh look at moviemaking during the Great Depression, David Welky examines Hollywood's response to the rise of fascism and the beginning of the Second World War. Chips, an. Chips, and Sergeant York -Welky traces the shifting motivations and arguments of the film industry, politicians, and the public as they negotiated how-or whether-the silver screen should.

The Moguls and the Dictators: Hollywood and the Coming of World War II. By David Welky. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008. In recounting the years of engagement, 1940-41, Welky is less successful. Hollywood had good reason for political timidity even as Hitler’s regime grew more threatening. Judaism, Welky notes, constituted the third rail of Hollywood’s politics (169). Fearful of anti-Semitism, the moguls insisted that their productions existed only to entertain.

David Welky is a Professor of History at the University of Central Arkansas. Among his most recent publications are The Moguls and the Dictators: Hollywood and the Coming of World War II (2008), Everything was Better in America: Mainstream Print Culture and the Great Depression (2008), The Thousand-Year Flood: The Ohio-Mississippi Disaster of 1937 (2011), America Between the Wars, 1919–1941: A Documentary Reader (Wiley-Blackwell, 2011). John Wayne (with Randy Roberts, 2012), and Marching Across the Color Line: A. Philip Randolph and Civil Rights in the World War II Era (2013).

David Welky is the author of The Thousand-Year Flood: The Ohio-Mississippi Disaster of 1937, The Moguls and the Dictators: Hollywood and the Coming of World War II, and other books. He is a professor of history at the University of Central Arkansas. He lives in Conway, Arkansas. Bibliographic information. Thirty Years in the Arctic Regions: The Narrative of a Polar Explorer Explorers Club. Simon and Schuster, 2017. 1510723862, 9781510723863.

Anyone who lived through World War II or its televised aftermath is familiar with Hollywood’s contribution to.

Anyone who lived through World War II or its televised aftermath is familiar with Hollywood’s contribution to the cause. David Welky’s well-written and absorbing new history The Moguls and the Dictators focuses on the run-up-the anti-fascist movies the studios produced from the mid-Thirties through Pearl Harbor as arguments for intervention in Europe’s war. Hitler presented an obvious problem for the immigrant and first-generation Jews, who largely founded and ran Hollywood

World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945.

World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries-including all the great powers-eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from more than 30 countries.

In this fresh look at moviemaking during the Great Depression, David Welky examines Hollywood’s response to the rise of fascism and the beginning of the Second World War. Through innovative analysis of hundreds of movies―including The Dawn Patrol, Goodbye, Mr. Chips, and Sergeant York―Welky traces the shifting motivations and arguments of the film industry, politicians, and the public as they negotiated how―or whether―the silver screen should portray Nazism, depict conflict overseas, promote Americanism, and support President Roosevelt’s rearmament efforts.

Hollywood, Welky argues, was a primary player in the debate between interventionists and isolationists. These competing groups vied for influence and control over the message Hollywood offered the public―either scorning it for being too timid or attacking it for being too aggressive. The national debate reached a fever pitch in September 1941, when isolationists in the U.S. Senate staged widely publicized hearings, accusing the movie industry of warmongering.

While prewar Hollywood often reflected the principles of the Roosevelt administration, it also sometimes outpaced the cautious and politically astute president. Providing Americans with the psychological preparation they needed to enter World War II, popular movies familiarized audiences with the wartime experience, offered definitions of patriotism and Americanism, and established the fundamental distinctions between democracy and dictatorship.

Welky's depth of research and focused, analytical approach will be appreciated by historians as well as film buffs.

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