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eBook The Art of War in the Age of Peace: U.S. Military Posture for the Post-Cold War World ePub

by Michael OHanlon

eBook The Art of War in the Age of Peace: U.S. Military Posture for the Post-Cold War World ePub
Author: Michael OHanlon
Language: English
ISBN: 0275942597
ISBN13: 978-0275942595
Publisher: Praeger; 1St Edition edition (August 24, 1992)
Pages: 176
Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 713
Formats: lrf lrf docx lit
ePub file: 1166 kb
Fb2 file: 1448 kb

O'Hanlon's is one of the first in-depth studies of how the .

O'Hanlon's is one of the first in-depth studies of how the . military might be reconfigured for the post-Cold War world. This study will prove useful for defense policy makers at the specialized levels and for students of the guns vs. butter policy issues and debates.

By Michael E. O'Hanlon. interests can be protected efficiently and effectively with a . In the realm of conventional forces, these cuts would be about twice as deep as those planned by Secretary of Defense Richard Cheney; in the nuclear realm they would be much deeper than those approved by the Bush administration.

war are and will remain extremely low and that the . O'Hanlon's is one of the first in-depth studies of how the .

This study begins with a set of strategic assumptions-most notably that the risks of . Russian war are and will remain extremely low and that the . military remains a stabilizing influence in many geographic theaters.

military posture for the post-cold war world. by Michael E. Published 1992 by Praeger in Westport, Conn. Military policy, Armed Forces.

Michael McFaul’s love is ‘Liberal Democracy’ a somewhat fey item immersed in mythology sometimes reducible as i. .

Michael McFaul’s love is ‘Liberal Democracy’ a somewhat fey item immersed in mythology sometimes reducible as in Russia and elsewhere to electoral democracy with uncertain outcomes.

cold war terrorism geopolitics ideology. Elsewhere in the world, Soviet defeats also masked longer term . Thus the economic defeat of Soviet-backed Communist guerrillas in much of Central America in the 1980s masked the failure of the . to promote successful economic development, state-building and real democracy in its own backyard.

Post-Cold War era is the period after the end of the Cold War. Because the Cold War was not an active war but rather a period of geopolitical tensions punctuated by proxy wars, there is disagreement on the official ending of this conflict and subsequ. Because the Cold War was not an active war but rather a period of geopolitical tensions punctuated by proxy wars, there is disagreement on the official ending of this conflict and subsequent existence of the post-Cold War era. Some scholars claim the Cold War ended when the world’s first treaty on nuclear disarmament was signed in 1987, the end of the Soviet Union as a superpower amid the Revolutions of 1989 or when the Soviet Union.

Find nearly any book by Michael E. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Military Posture for the Post-Cold War World: The Art of War in the Age of Peace: . Military Posture for the Post-Cold War World: ISBN 9780275942595 (978-0-275-94259-5) Hardcover, Praeger, 1992. Bending History: Barack Obama's Foreign Policy (Brookings FOCUS Book). by Martin S. Indyk, Kenneth G. Lieberthal, Michael E. ISBN 9780815724476 (978-0-8157-2447-6) Softcover, Brookings Institution Press, 2013.

The Cold War was a period of geopolitical tension between the Soviet Union with its satellite states (the Eastern Bloc), and the United States with its allies (the Western Bloc) after World War II. The history of the conflict began between 1946 (the year . diplomat George F. Kennan's "Long Telegram" from Moscow cemented a . foreign policy of containment of Soviet expansionism) and 1947 (the introduction of the Truman Doctrine). The Cold War began to de-escalate after the Revolutions of 1989

This study begins with a set of strategic assumptions--most notably that the risks of U.S.-Russian war are and will remain extremely low and that the U.S. military remains a stabilizing influence in many geographic theaters. O'Hanlon then shows that the United States' interests in the Third World, while nowhere truly vital, are sufficiently important to justify a measured degree of global military presence and engagement. Historical, political, and military analysis suggests that these interests can be protected efficiently and effectively with a U.S. military reduced in size by roughly 40 to 50 percent in most types of major combat forces, and by 95 percent in nuclear forces. In the realm of conventional forces, these cuts would be about twice as deep as those planned by Secretary of Defense Richard Cheney; in the nuclear realm they would be much deeper than those approved by the Bush administration. By contrast, analysis suggests that U.S. capabilities should be largely held constant--or in some cases even expanded--in logistics, intelligence and communications, R&D, and special forces.

The resulting force posture would cost about $200 billion in 1991 dollars through the early years of the next century, and perhaps $230 billion annually thereafter. O'Hanlon's is one of the first in-depth studies of how the U.S. military might be reconfigured for the post-Cold War world. This study will prove useful for defense policy makers at the specialized levels and for students of the guns vs. butter policy issues and debates.

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