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eBook Danger Close: Tactical Air Controllers in Afghanistan and Iraq (Williams-Ford Texas AM University Military History Series) ePub

by Steve Call

eBook Danger Close: Tactical Air Controllers in Afghanistan and Iraq (Williams-Ford Texas AM University Military History Series) ePub
Author: Steve Call
Language: English
ISBN: 1603441425
ISBN13: 978-1603441421
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press; 1 edition (January 15, 2010)
Pages: 250
Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 274
Formats: rtf mobi lrf lit
ePub file: 1828 kb
Fb2 file: 1898 kb

Series: Williams-Ford Texas A&M University Military History Series (Book 113). Danger Close" is a straightforward and clear look at the work of (largely) USAF Joint Terminal Air Controllers in the opening phases of the Afghanistan and Iraq campaigns.

Series: Williams-Ford Texas A&M University Military History Series (Book 113). Paperback: 250 pages. The author describes the day-to-day work of USAF enlisted controllers embedded with US SF and conventional manoeuvre forces as well as some of the wider organisational and conceptual challenges that impeded Close Air Support (CAS) development in the 1990's and in the opening phases of Afghanistan and Iraq.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Danger Close: Tactical Air Controllers in Afghanistan . Print Length: 250 pages. Publication Date: January 15, 2010.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Danger Close: Tactical Air Controllers in Afghanistan and Iraq (Williams-Ford Texas A&M University Military History Series).

Home Browse Books Book details, Danger Close: Tactical Air Controllers i. .America had a secret weapon," writes Steve Call of the period immediately following September 11, 2001, as planners contemplated the invasion of Afghanistan

Home Browse Books Book details, Danger Close: Tactical Air Controllers i.Danger Close: Tactical Air Controllers in Afghanistan and Iraq. America had a secret weapon," writes Steve Call of the period immediately following September 11, 2001, as planners contemplated the invasion of Afghanistan. This weapon consisted of small teams of Special Forces operatives trained in close air support (CAS) who, in cooperation with the loose federation of Afghan rebels opposed to the Taliban regime, soon began achieving impressive-and unexpected-military victories over Taliban forces and the al-Qaeda terrorists they had sponsored.

America had a secret weapon, writes Steve Call of the period immediately following September 11, 2001, as planners contemplated the invasion of.Book in the Texas A & M University Military History Series Series).

America had a secret weapon, writes Steve Call of the period immediately following September 11, 2001, as planners contemplated the invasion of Afghanistan.

Together, let's build an Open Library for the World. Published 2010 by Texas A&M; University Press. There's no description for this book yet. ISBN 13. 9781603441421.

Danger Close: Tactical Air Controllers in Afghanistan and Iraq (hardback).

Danger Close (Williams-Ford Texas A&M University Military History Series). Published January 15th 2010 by Texas A&M University Press. Danger Close: Tactical Air Controllers in Afghanistan and Iraq (hardback). Published September 21st 2007 by Texas A&M University Press Consortium.

Written by Steve Call, Audiobook narrated by Claton Butcher. It is part of the Williams-Ford Texas A&M University Military History Series. It's a bracing and realistic tale-much of it told in the raw words of the air power experts who directed close air support for the troops on the ground.

Texas A & M University military history series 11. America had a secret weapon, " writes Steve Call of the period immediately following September 11, 2001, as planners contemplated the invasion of Afghanistan.

Texas A & M University military history series 113. Online. This weapon consisted of small teams of Special Forces operatives trained in close air support (CAS) who, in cooperation with the loose federation of Afghan rebels opposed to the Taliban regime, soon began achieving impressive - and unexpected - military victories over Taliban forces and the al-Qaeda terrorists they had sponsored.

America had a secret weapon," writes Steve Call of the period immediately following September 11, 2001, as planners contemplated the invasion of Afghanistan. Williams-Ford Texas a&M University Military History. Subjects: Afghan War, 2001 Aerial operations, American

America had a secret weapon," writes Steve Call of the period immediately following September 11, 2001, as planners contemplated the invasion of Afghanistan Full description Williams-Ford Texas a&M University Military History. Subjects: Afghan War, 2001 Aerial operations, American. Iraq War, 2003-2011 Aerial operations, American. Close air support History 21st century.

“America had a secret weapon,” writes Steve Call of the period immediately following September 11, 2001, as planners contemplated the invasion of Afghanistan. This weapon consisted of small teams of Special Forces operatives trained in close air support (CAS) who, in cooperation with the loose federation of Afghan rebels opposed to the Taliban regime, soon began achieving impressive—and unexpected—military victories over Taliban forces and the al-Qaeda terrorists they had sponsored. The astounding success of CAS tactics coupled with ground operations in Afghanistan soon drew the attention of military decision makers and would eventually factor into the planning for another campaign: Operation Iraqi Freedom. But who, exactly, are these air power experts and what is the function of the TACPs (Tactical Air Control Parties) in which they operate? Danger Close provides a fascinating look at a dedicated, courageous, innovative, and often misunderstood and misused group of military professionals. Drawing on the gripping first-hand accounts of their battlefield experiences, Steve Call allows the TACPs to speak for themselves. He accompanies their narratives with informed analysis of the development of CAS strategy, including potentially controversial aspects of the interservice rivalries between the air force and the army which have at times complicated and even obstructed the optimal employment of TACP assets. Danger Close makes clear, however, that the systematic coordination of air power and ground forces played an invaluable supporting role in the initial military victories in both Afghanistan and Iraq. This first-ever examination of the intense, life-and-death world of the close air support specialist will introduce readers to a crucial but little-known aspect of contemporary warfare and add a needed chapter in American military history studies.
Zeleence
"Danger Close" is a straightforward and clear look at the work of (largely) USAF Joint Terminal Air Controllers in the opening phases of the Afghanistan and Iraq campaigns. The author describes the day-to-day work of USAF enlisted controllers embedded with US SF and conventional manoeuvre forces as well as some of the wider organisational and conceptual challenges that impeded Close Air Support (CAS) development in the 1990's and in the opening phases of Afghanistan and Iraq.

Writing very much from the perspective of the US ALO/TACP community, the author explains the lack of institutional interest in CAS by the USAF (and to a slightly lesser extent, the US Army) prior to 9/11 led to neither service being well prepared to integrate CAS with tactical manoeuvre. His description of organisational, doctrinal and procedural innovations between the start of OEF and the fall of Baghdad is clear and insightful (perhaps less so for the reader without a military background). At the tactical level, his first-hand accounts of the efficiency and effectiveness of US enlisted controllers in both operations demonstrate the fallacy of the old perception that JTACs needed to be both pilots and officers to be safe and effective.

A limitation of the book is that it is written very much from an airman's perspective and is to a large degree focused on telling the stories of the guys at the coal face. Although the author is not a rabid USAF partisan (he is open and forthcoming about USAF institutional shortcomings) his perspective is very much that of an airman and his interest is the relatively narrow one (albeit somewhat important) of getting weapons from aircraft onto targets. I would have liked to have seen more discussion on the challenges of integrating air with artillery, attack aviation, manoeuvre, etc, and some observations on how the ALO network fit into manoeuvre and fires/effects planning. Some more discussion of alternative means of generating this effect (eg, the USMC ANGLICO's or some of the Coalition approaches to training and fostering the JTAC capability) would have been worthwhile, as would some wider discussion of the selection and training of USAF JTACs. While I agree with the author that the rank or service of a JTAC is of little relevance, I think he may underestimate the long term danger of it remaining an `enlisted only' sport. Despite the professional competence of NCOs in this role, without a community of officers who are engaged in CAS and in a position to act as advocates there is a danger that the importance and nuances of this capability will not be properly understood or resourced at the highest levels in the future.

For the reader with little or no background in the subject who is interested in first person accounts by JTACs and gaining a broad understanding of the challenges of supporting land forces with air power, this is an informative and easy to read volume easily worth four stars. If you have a close professional interest in the subject, add another half a star on top of that.
Silvermaster
I wanted to like this book, but I have some problems with it. As a former USAF flyer I'm a big advocate for all things Air Force, and especially the often under appreciated/recognized people in career fields like TACP. However, the author chose to only highlight the successes of the Air Force TACPs, and hide the problems.

One glaring example was when the author glosses over the incident on December 5, 2001 near Kandahar, Afghanistan, when an Air Force TACP called in an air strike on a Special Forces team, and their Afghan counterparts. The author briefly mentions the incident, but fails to mention it was the fault of the TACP on the ground who made mistakes resulting in hitting the friendly forces with a JDAM. Two Army soldiers and 100 Afghan guerrillas, were killed, and many more were severely wounded. A better, and more honest account of that incident is in Eric Blehm's book, "The Only Thing Worth Dying For." Call briefly mentions the incident, but does not tell the readers it was an error by the USAF TACP that caused the tragedy.

Knowing how he treated that well documented failing by the TACPs, it calls into question the integrity of his work, as it appears to be just a long winded PR piece for TACPs.
Gashakar
Mr. Call collected excellent primary source/primary actor interviews for this look at the role of Tactical Air Controllers. Coordinating between ground troops and close air support has been a thorny issue since the airplane was added to the military inventory. This book explains recent innovations at the battalion and under level, highlighting the professionalism of enlisted personnel as significant force multipliers. While members of the Air Force, they live "in the mud" with the troops on the ground, integrated with Army special forces or armored units.

Call makes the common-sense argument that neither air power nor "boots on the ground" win wars, but rather a seamless integration of the two. He uses the experiences of the TACPs on the ground during the initial wars in Afghanistan and Iraq to buttress his argument. Short discussions at the beginning and end of the book sum up his points nicely.

I only have a few complaints about this book. While it wasn't a problem for me, the military acronyms come fast and heavy. Readers with less experience reading military documents might struggle at times to understand what is being discussed. The glossary at the end of the book is a big help and should be marked by Kindle users. Secondly, I would have liked to see a further examination of airpower uses in the aftermath of the initial invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan. As the Afghan war in particular has entered its tenth year, I would like to hear if the tactics outlined here have changed. Finally, while it was no problem for me, I could understand if some would call this book "war porn" for all the descriptions of large-scale slaughter of opposing forces. My response would be "it's war, that's what happens, and it's hell. Deal."

Overall, this is a good close examination of recent developments in close air support integration. Worth a read by anyone associated with the military or modern military history.
Drelalen
I have been debating on how I should review this book. I think the description is a bit misleading. I believe the first hand accounts are short and too brief. It has ramblings of redundant thoughts on the subject of CAS and how it was misunderstood - over and over. I'm half way through this book and it has become predictable.

It has a lot of Dr. Steve Call's thoughts on the command perspective of CAS and TACP. So far the longest first hand account is approx. 3 pages of so that I have run in to. I'm actually dreading returning to the book to finish it. The books length probably could have been shortened considerably without the repetitive writing.
great ant
Awesome read, about tacp's in afganistan right after the two towers went down.
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