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eBook Food Co-ops in America: Communities, Consumption, and Economic Democracy ePub

by Anne Meis Knupfer

eBook Food Co-ops in America: Communities, Consumption, and Economic Democracy ePub
Author: Anne Meis Knupfer
Language: English
ISBN: 0801451140
ISBN13: 978-0801451140
Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1 edition (May 21, 2013)
Pages: 288
Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 623
Formats: rtf lit mobi docx
ePub file: 1764 kb
Fb2 file: 1859 kb

Communities, Consumption, and Economic Democracy. Cornell university press ithaca and london.

Communities, Consumption, and Economic Democracy. to Franz Knupfer and Melissa DiRito and to my sisters, Betsy, Jeanne, and Mary. Introduction: A Democratic Impulse. 1. Food Cooperatives before the Great Depression. Part I. Collective Visions of the Depression.

In Food Co-ops in America, Anne Meis Knupfer examines the economic and democratic ideals of food cooperatives. She shows readers what the histories of food co-ops can tell us about our rights as consumers, how we can practice democracy and community, and how we might do business differently. In the first history of food co-ops in the United States, Knupfer draws on newsletters, correspondence, newspaper coverage, and board meeting minutes, as well as visits to food co-ops around the country, where she listened to managers, board members, workers, and members.

Anne Meis Knupfer makes a compelling case for creating and sustaining food co-ops where lively political, social, and economic discourse converge on the all-important topic of food. Food Co-ops in America is a great book for anyone interested in the lessons and challenges of alternative economics. ―Steve Alves, documentary filmmaker, Food For Change. Anne Meis Knupfer's book is not only an outstanding historical resource for both present and future generations of cooperators but also a fascinating read

The general notion is that insects cannot be food for human beings. Some communities of Assam and northeastern hilly states of India also have been enjoying the uncommon taste of insects.

Article in Gastronomica 15(1):99-100 · February 2015 with 9 Reads. The general notion is that insects cannot be food for human beings. Some communities of Assam and northeastern hilly states of India also have been enjoying the uncommon taste of insects marketed in some countries.

Food Coops In America Communities Consumption And Economic Democracy. Food Coops In America Communities Consumption And Economic Democracy Close.

In fact, food co-ops have been a viable food source, as well as a means of collective and democratic ownership, for nearly 180 years. In Food Co-ops in America, Anne Meis Knupfer examines the economic and democratic ideals of food cooperatives.

Food co-ops operate on a cash-and-carry basis Knupfer has made a solid contribution to knowledge about the importance of food cooperatives in the United States, both past and present.

Food co-ops operate on a cash-and-carry basis. Various ethnic and racial groups organized cooperatives in the Midwest and Northeast, such as African Americans in Harlem, New York. Women often provided, and still provide, the organizational and managerial leadership as well as function as a co-op’s consumer activists. Anne Knupfer gives readers an understanding of these complexities that is both detailed and broad. Knupfer has made a solid contribution to knowledge about the importance of food cooperatives in the United States, both past and present.

Food Co-Ops in America : Communities, Consumption, and Economic Democracy. by Anne Meis Knupfer.

Food Co-ops in America provides background for understanding the often .

Food Co-ops in America provides background for understanding the often farreaching consequences of our individual decisions about food. Current trends reflected in consumer demand for such things as organic foods and sustainable agriculture, for example, are rooted in consumers' historical desire for nutritious, economical, and ethical food choices.

In recent years, American shoppers have become more conscious of their food choices and have increasingly turned to CSAs, farmers' markets, organic foods in supermarkets, and to joining and forming new food co-ops. In fact, food co-ops have been a viable food source, as well as a means of collective and democratic ownership, for nearly 180 years.

In Food Co-ops in America, Anne Meis Knupfer examines the economic and democratic ideals of food cooperatives. She shows readers what the histories of food co-ops can tell us about our rights as consumers, how we can practice democracy and community, and how we might do business differently. In the first history of food co-ops in the United States, Knupfer draws on newsletters, correspondence, newspaper coverage, and board meeting minutes, as well as visits to food co-ops around the country, where she listened to managers, board members, workers, and members.

What possibilities for change―be they economic, political, environmental or social―might food co-ops offer to their members, communities, and the globalized world? Food co-ops have long advocated for consumer legislation, accurate product labeling, and environmental protection. Food co-ops have many constituents―members, workers, board members, local and even global producers―making the process of collective decision-making complex and often difficult. Even so, food co-ops offer us a viable alternative to corporate capitalism. In recent years, committed co-ops have expanded their social vision to improve access to healthy food for all by helping to establish food co-ops in poorer communities.

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