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eBook The Making of the Roman Army: From Republic to Empire ePub

by Lawrence Keppie

eBook The Making of the Roman Army: From Republic to Empire ePub
Author: Lawrence Keppie
Language: English
ISBN: 0415151503
ISBN13: 978-0415151504
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (February 21, 1998)
Pages: 288
Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 843
Formats: mbr doc rtf mobi
ePub file: 1881 kb
Fb2 file: 1538 kb

Lawrence Keppie is Professor Emeritus of Roman History and Archaeology and retired Senior Curator of Archaeology .

Lawrence Keppie is Professor Emeritus of Roman History and Archaeology and retired Senior Curator of Archaeology, History, and Ethnography at the Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow. He is the author of Understanding Roman Inscriptions and The Legacy of Rome: Scotland’s Roman Remains. The core of the book, however, is about the Roman army between Marius and the Flavians - roughly from 100 BC to 100 AD. The main strongpoint of this book is to show how the army evolved little by little from an army of part-time soldiers made of conscripted citizens into the fully professional force of the Empire.

Making of the Roman Army: From Republic to Empire. Understanding Roman inscriptions. Legions and veterans : Roman army papers. Colonisation and veteran settlement in Italy. The Romans On The Bay Of Naples: An Archaeological Guide

Making of the Roman Army: From Republic to Empire. The Romans On The Bay Of Naples: An Archaeological Guide. Roman Distance Slabs from the Antonine Wall: A Brief Guide.

Keppie does an excellent job of giving us a general, but sufficiently detailed overview of the Roman army from its early Republican days as mere hoplites, until the Early Imperial Army 600 years later. The book does well in highlighting key themes and individuals that shaped the army in various stages, as well as depicting several pivotal battles in the Republic's history from the Heraclea to Actium.

Lawrence Keppie overcomes the traditional dichotomy between the historical view of the Republic and the archaeological approach to the Empire by examining archaeological evidence from the earlier. The arguments of The Making of the Roman Army are clearly illustrated with specially prepared maps and diagrams and photographs of Republican monuments and coins.

long appendix section on mostly irrelevent material, nevertheless is a good introductory book for the beginner.

Keppie's work regarding the development of the Roman Army from the republic to the early principate does a good job of describing some of the aspects of the Roman Army: marching camp, weapons and organisation. Lacking any meaningful battle descriptions, and with somewhat long appendix section on mostly irrelevent material, nevertheless is a good introductory book for the beginner. Download (pdf, . 1 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Lawrence Keppie overcomes the traditional dichotomy between the historical view of the Republic and the archaeological approach to the Empire by examining archaeological evidence from the earlier years.

Lawrence Keppie pays particular attention to the transitional period between Republic and Empire - the time of Julius Caesar, Mark Antony, and Augustus

Lawrence Keppie pays particular attention to the transitional period between Republic and Empire - the time of Julius Caesar, Mark Antony, and Augustus.

Lawrence Keppie Glasgow May 1997. Rather the theme here is of the army’s growth, and of its developing institutions and traditions, all of which lie behind the familiar imperial army.

The arguments of The Making of the Roman Army are clearly illustrated with specially prepared maps and diagrams and photographs of. .Lawrence Keppie is Reader in Roman Archaeology at the Hunterian Museum, Glasgow.

The arguments of The Making of the Roman Army are clearly illustrated with specially prepared maps and diagrams and photographs of Republican monuments and coins. He is the author of Understanding Roman Inscriptions (Batsford 1991) and the forthcoming Army of Augustus (Routledge).

From Republic to Empire.

In this new edition, with a new preface and an updated bibliography, the author provides a comprehensive and well-documented survey of the evolution and growth of the remarkable military enterprise of the Roman army.Lawrence Keppie overcomes the traditional dichotomy between the historical view of the Republic and the archaeological approach to the Empire by examining archaeological evidence from the earlier years.The arguments of The Making of the Roman Army are clearly illustrated with specially prepared maps and diagrams and photographs of Republican monuments and coins.
Xig
Excellent book and a great seller.
Xanzay
This is a good guide for anyone who is interested in how the Roman army functioned and how it changed over time. For specialists, this book will seem simple but for advanced undergraduates or disinterested graduate students the book is wonderful and I highly recommend it for them. Non-students should find it readable but may wish to consult other sources as well. Advanced graduate students who are more interested in military history will find it a bit boring. Overall well done and well written for the appropriate audience.
Thetalen
This appears at first to be a book for school kids. But it is full of information, pictures. It's a basic text that becomes a reference book.
just one girl
This book was first published in 1984 and, in certain respects, it has become a bit dated. This is particularly the case because it does not make use of the archaeological discoveries of the last 25 years. It nevertheless remains a very useful reference and a fascinating book to read for anyone interesting in "the making of the Roman army."
It is rather sketchy for the first centuries of Rome, although this is largely because little is known. It gets better and more detailed when it hits the third century BC. The core of the book, however, is about the Roman army between Marius and the Flavians - roughly from 100 BC to 100 AD. The main strongpoint of this book is to show how the army evolved little by little from an army of part-time soldiers made of conscripted citizens into the fully professional force of the Empire.

A related point is the continuity that the author shows. The the evolutions were slow and progressive and, as the author puts it, the Romans were both inherently conservative but also, paradoxically, also very flexible, relentless and capable of adapting weapons and techniques from their various enemies. In fact, as Keppie shows, most of their equipment was borrowed - and improved over time - from their enemies, whether the Spanish sword and pugio or the Celtic mail shirts and helmets.

Another interesting and well-known point is the key role played by the centurions who, rather than being equated to modern non-commissioned and despite having mostly risen from the ranks, should functionally be seen as captains that would be leading their troops by example and from the front. The author shows clearly how this led to rather high casualties among them. More generally, the book is a rather fascinating combination showing the army's life conditions, organization, commandment and performances on campaign and in battle during the whole period.

What really comes out is the thoroughness of the training and the thoughtfulness and emphasis put on morale and small unit cohesion, whether the individual tent parties or the centuries, whether through standards, decorations or punishments. What it also shows is that the roman legionaries were no supermen, despite the reputation for invincibility that the legions earned. They were rebellions, mutinies and desertions and they were some crushing defeats and cases where they broke and ran. But, by and large, they won much more often than they lost and, even when they lost or did not win outright, they relentlessly came again, and again, and again...

An interesting and valuable point is the use made by the author of the tombstones found across Europe to determine the positions of various legions and the campaigns they participated in. Here also, finding over the last quarter of a century have increased the amount of material that is available but the author's systematic research is nevertheless still valuable and used. Finally, they are the numerous annexes tracing the history of the various legions that fought for Caesar, Mark Antony and Octavian and what they became under the Empire during the first century AD. While some of the reconstructions and statements may be conjectural, the author's work in this respect largely pioneered research in this area

Still a very useful reference and a great read. I warmly recommend this book for all. It is, despite its age, one of the best starting points for someone wanting to get involved with the Roman army.
Malien
I found this book to be a nice companion piece to Graham Webster's The Roman Imperial Army. While Webster took the forensic approach to the Roman Army and focused on the physical structure ( armor, weapons, organization, forts, etc. ) Dr. Keppie looks at the evolution of the army from the republic to the early Empire and the role the army played in this transition both positive and negative. When read in conjucture with Dr. Webster the book fits in nicely. There are pictures, drawings, and layouts of roman camps over diagrams of the archeological excavations of the actual forts and camps. This a very easy/pleasurable read and would make a nice additon to one's personal library.
Alien
I think this book is very interesting because it tells everything about the Roman Army and information you never knew. It includes the great information about people like generals and great emperors like Julius Caesar and his conquest of Gaul.Also tells from what kind of armour they wear to what they used as a weapon.It also explains there stradegies in battle such as when they put there sheilds together and keeping out any flying objects.This book will teach you any type of questions you have about the Roman Army.If you are doing a big report on the Roman Army and you need info this is the book to get and read.It has the table of contents if you need something specific its very helpful in a report or speach of some sort as I said.You will learn the great generals of Rome and How they soon took over all of Europe. ... So read the book and see for yourself.
Mozel
This book is a great reference for people interested in the Roman Army. Keppie describes the changes that took place within the army throughout the Republic. He includes pictures and diagrams of how the army set up before battle as well as pictures of the weapons and armor the legions were using at that time. The bibliography is extensive for those interested in finding out more information. This is a book that is used by many other books on the Roman army. Buy it now!
Keppie's work regarding the development of the Roman Army from the republic to the early principate does a good job of describing some of the aspects of the Roman Army: marching camp, weapons and organisation. Lacking any meaningful battle descriptions, and with somewhat long appendix section on mostly irrelevent material, nevertheless is a good introductory book for the beginner.
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