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eBook Religion in the Public Square ePub

by Nicholas Wolterstorff

eBook Religion in the Public Square ePub
Author: Nicholas Wolterstorff
Language: English
ISBN: 0847683419
ISBN13: 978-0847683413
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (December 1996)
Pages: 176
Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 670
Formats: txt lit azw mobi
ePub file: 1494 kb
Fb2 file: 1943 kb

Nicholas Paul Wolterstorff (born 1932) is an American philosopher and a liturgical theologian Religion in the Public Square (with Robert Audi). Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield.

Nicholas Paul Wolterstorff (born 1932) is an American philosopher and a liturgical theologian. He is currently Noah Porter Professor Emeritus Philosophical Theology at Yale University. A prolific writer with wide-ranging philosophical and theological interests, he has written books on aesthetics, epistemology, political philosophy, philosophy of religion, metaphysics, and philosophy of education. Wolterstorff explained that he published the book in the hope that it will be of help to some of those who find themselves with us in the company of mourners. Religion in the Public Square (with Robert Audi).

Written with engaging clarity, Religion in the Public Square will spur discussion among scholars . Wolterstorff is the Noah Porter Professor Emeritus of Philosophical Theology, and Fellow of Berkeley College at Yale University

Written with engaging clarity, Religion in the Public Square will spur discussion among scholars, students, and citizens. Wolterstorff is the Noah Porter Professor Emeritus of Philosophical Theology, and Fellow of Berkeley College at Yale University. A prolific writer with wide-ranging philosophical and theological interests, he has written books on metaphysics, aesthetics, political philosophy, epistemology and theology and philosophy of religion. Books by Nicholas Wolterstorff

Robert Audi and Nicholas Wolterstorff are two of the most thoughtful voices in the contemporary debate about the proper role of religion in politics. Their book, Religion In The Public Square, makes an important contribution. I recommend it highly.

Robert Audi and Nicholas Wolterstorff are two of the most thoughtful voices in the contemporary debate about the proper role of religion in politics. Michael J. Perry, Northwestern University). The book presents two sides to the question of the role of religion in the public square. Both positions are well argued, informed and clearly presented.

Wolterstorff argues that religious elements are both appropriate in politics and indispensable to the vitality of a pluralistic democracy. Each philosopher first states his position in detail, then responds to and criticizes the opposing viewpoint. Written with engaging clarity, Religion in the Public Square will spur discussion among scholars, students, and citizens.

Audi, . & Wolterstorff, N. (1997). Religion in the public square. Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield. Brooks, . Dionne, E. Siegel, R. (2012). Week in politics: Birth control and the primaries. From Ireneaus to Grotius.

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Nicholas Wolterstorff Robert Audi Religion Public Liberalism. Audi, . Cavanaugh, W. (2009). The myth of religious violence.

Robert Audi, Nicholas Wolterstorff. This vigorous debate between two distinguished philosophers presents two views on a topic of worldwide importance: the role of religion in politics. Audi argues that citizens in a free democracy should distinguish religious and secular considerations and give them separate though related roles. Wolterstorff argues that religious elements are both appropriate in politics and indispensable to the vitality of a pluralistic democracy.

Religion in the Public Square (with Robert Audi). Sloane, Andrew, On Being A Christian in the Academy: Nicholas Wolterstorff and the Practice of Christian Scholarship, Paternoster, Carlisle UK, 2003. Thomas Reid and the Story of Epistemology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Educating for Life: Reflections on Christian Teaching and Learning. Christian philosophy. List of American philosophers.

Religion in the Public Square: The Place of Religious Convictions in Political Debate (Point/Counterpoint), by Robert Audi and Nicholas Wolterstorff. Audi, Robert and Wolterstorff, Nicholas (1997). Bibliographic Citation. Related Items in Google Scholar. Весь DSpace Сообщества и коллекции Авторы Названия By Creation Date Эта коллекция Авторы Названия By Creation Date.

This vigorous debate between two distinguished philosophers presents two views on a topic of worldwide importance: the role of religion in politics. Audi argues that citizens in a free democracy should distinguish religious and secular considerations and give them separate though related roles. Wolterstorff argues that religious elements are both appropriate in politics and indispensable to the vitality of a pluralistic democracy. Each philosopher first states his position in detail, then responds to and criticizes the opposing viewpoint. Written with engaging clarity, Religion in the Public Square will spur discussion among scholars, students, and citizens.
Haralem
This book is supposed to be part of a series of texts that provide a point counterpoint format, parallelling something of a debate on some interesting subject. "Religion in the Public Square" is not a debate, however, but two parallel essays with reflective commentaries on each by the opposing author. Ironically, each of the essays describes largely the SAME position (that of the ideal of liberal democracy, which protects religious liberties and the neutrality of the state with respect to religion) but they have only subtle philosophical differences. For example, Wolterstorff thinks that any reasons whatever should be allowed in public discourse so long as they are persuasive to the people hearing them, and Audi thinks that the reasons given should have constituted a significant part of the basis for why the person employing those reasons accepts them himself. Hardly the basis for an interesting discussion, one might say.

Unfortunately, neither author writes their essays in an argumentative format nor do they even have the other author in mind when they write their essays. Thus, they often repeat the same concepts using different language and different terminology, which only adds to the confusion of the book.

The first author, Robert Audi, presents his arguments with little or no structure in an almost stream of conscience format. Although he ultimately has important arguments lurking about, they get lost amongst his many useless, technical distinctions that he forgets about as soon as he raises them (as if they were important distinctions for their own sake). If the book was a debate, he would be making points and repeating them without telling us why they are important in the larger context of the debate. In his commentary on Wolterstorff, he writes sentences like, "I propose that conscientious citizens have a prima facie obligation to have and be willing to offer at least one secular reason that is evidentially adequate and motivationally sufficient" (123), as if it was obvious why it was important to note that the obligation was "prima facie" or that it was clear for whom these so-called "secular reasons" should be motivational. Moreover, when Audi writes this sentence, his opponent (Wolterstorff) has already criticized the coherence of a "secular reason" as ultimately meaningless, and yet Audi insists on using it in an unqualified and ambiguous way. Such lazy language is simply unacceptable, but unavoidable in the a book of this scope. For unfamiliar readers, Audi's complete text on this subject "Religious Commitment and Secular Reason" will be indispensable for understanding his ideas.

Wolterstorff by contrast provides a more clear although less convincing argument for allowing religious language in the public square. Although his arguments are subtle, profoundly post modern, and surprisingly anti-foundationalist, much of his analysis is unfortunately over-theoretical and uninteresting from a practical standpoint. His criticisms of the "independent source" of Rawls and Locke may interest professors of jurisprudence, but not an undergraduate with a merely passing interest on the subject.

In the end, neither author more than glosses on any of the interesting subjects that should have been the focus of this debate such as abortion or school prayer (this book was written before stem cell research was an issue). The whole discussion stays at the level of vague abstractions and hypothetical political theories, never so much as touching on the real problems with religious reasoning in the public square (such as the Catholic Church's perpetuation of AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa through its condemnation of condom use in that region, or religious arguments against homosexual marriage).

Finally, it is sadly not obvious that either author is aware of any religion besides Christianity or (in passing) Judaism. Ironically, Audi, who was apparently blind to the fact that no religion besides Christianity or Judaism has been mentioned, writes of Wolterstorff's essay that it is "sensitive to a variety of religious perspectives" (121). The book gets one star for being unintentionally humorous.
Ventelone
This work provides insight into two key alternative philosophical perspectives on religion, publics, and politics. A must read by philosophers at the height of their intellectual careers!
Lynnak
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Kizshura
I had to read this for class and it was slow going, but Audi and Wolterstorff offer differing opinions on the role of religion and religious speech in the public sphere.
Jeronashe
This book is appropriate for an upper level philosophy seminar in the major, and will also be of interest to graduate students in political science and law. The debate between Audi and Wolterstorff is not really about the entire multifaceted topic of the "separation of church and state" in the United States (a lot of which concerns the scope of freedom of religious practice and strict limitations on public funding of religious causes). The debate is actually about a much more focused topic central to democratic theory: in a nation governed by a legitimate democratic process of law and policy formation through open debate and voting, what sort of considerations is it morally legitimate for citizens invoke in deciding what laws and policies to support, and appealing to others to share their views? (Thus the question is about moral norms of citizenship, not legal norms governing actual democratic processes). In Rawlsian lingo, this is a question about the content of "public reason." Audi believes citizens in a democracy ought not invoke religious beliefs, whereas Wolterstorff thinks such beliefs are on the same epistemic footing as all other considerations on which citizens must draw in making rational judgments about the common good of their society. Other authors who have contributed to this debate include Michael Perry, John Rawls, Phillip Quinn, and the authors featured in Paul Weithman's collection. The biggest drawback of all this literature, including this book, is that the interlocutors on both sides are unfamiliar with the growing body of work on the deliberative theory of democracy coming out of the republican tradition in jurisprudence and out of discourse ethics in continental philosophy. So they to not address the implications of deliberative models of democracy for the issue of appeal to religious convictions in political action.
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