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eBook Kwanzaa: Black Power and the Making of the African-American Holiday Tradition ePub

by Keith A. Mayes

eBook Kwanzaa: Black Power and the Making of the African-American Holiday Tradition ePub
Author: Keith A. Mayes
Language: English
ISBN: 0415998549
ISBN13: 978-0415998543
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (July 29, 2009)
Pages: 312
Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 887
Formats: rtf lrf lrf lrf
ePub file: 1484 kb
Fb2 file: 1916 kb

Those wishing to further their understanding of African American holidays and their place in American culture would do well to read this book. Ellen M. Litwicki, Professor of History, State University of New York at Fredonia – author of America’s Public Holidays, 1865-1920.

Since 1966, Kwanzaa has been celebrated as a black holiday tradition - an annual recognition of cultural pride in. .

Since 1966, Kwanzaa has been celebrated as a black holiday tradition - an annual recognition of cultural pride in the African American community. But how did this holiday originate, and what is its broader cultural significance? Kwanzaa: Black Power and the Making of the African-American Holiday Tradition explores the political beginning and later expansion of Kwanzaa, from its start as a Black Power holiday, to its current place as one of the most mainstream of the black holiday traditions.

Электронная книга "Kwanzaa: Black Power and the Making of the African-American Holiday Tradition", Keith A. Mayes. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Kwanzaa: Black Power and the Making of the African-American Holiday Tradition" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Home Browse Books Book details, Kwanzaa: Black Power and the . For Black Power activists, Kwanzaa was just as important as the Civil Rights Act of 1964 or the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Home Browse Books Book details, Kwanzaa: Black Power and the Making of the. Kwanzaa: Black Power and the Making of the African-American Holiday Tradition. Since 1966, Kwanzaa has been celebrated as a black holiday tradition - an annual recognition of cultural pride in the African American community. Kwanzaa was their answer to what they understood as the ubiquity of white cultuliday appropriation.

Preface 1. The Black Protest Calendar and the African American Holiday Tradition 2. Maulana Karenga, Black Cultural Nationalism, and the Making of Kwanzaa 3. Kwanzaa, Cultural Nationalism, and the Promotion of a Black Power Holiday 4. Holiday Marketing, Multiculturalism and the Mainstreaming of Black Power 5. Calendar Legitimacy: Toward a Theory of Black Holidays.

Since 1966, Kwanzaa has been celebrated as a black holiday tradition – an annual recognition of cultural pride in.

Since 1966, Kwanzaa has been celebrated as a black holiday tradition – an annual recognition of cultural pride in the African American community.

African-American holiday. Alternative Title: Kwanza. Each of the days of the celebration is dedicated to one of the seven principles of Kwanzaa: unity (umoja), self-determination (kujichagulia), collective responsibility (ujima), cooperative economics (ujamaa), purpose (nia), creativity (kuumba), and faith (imani). There also are seven symbols of the holiday: fruits, vegetables, and nuts; a straw mat; a candleholder; ears of corn (maize); gifts; a communal cup signifying unity; and seven candles in the African colours of red, green, and black, symbolizing the seven principles.

Each of the seven days of Kwanzaa honors a different principle.

The year 2016 will see the 50th annual Kwanzaa, the African American holiday celebrated from December 26 to January 1. It is estimated that some 18 million African Americans take part in Kwanzaa. Kwanzaa is not a religious holiday, nor is it meant to replace Christmas. It was created by Dr. Maulana "Ron" Karenga, a professor of Black Studies, in 1966. Each of the seven days of Kwanzaa honors a different principle. These principles are believed to have been key to building strong, productive families and communities in Africa. During Kwanzaa, celebrants greet each other with "Habari gani," or "What's the news?"

Since 1966, Kwanzaa has been celebrated as a black holiday tradition –an annual recognition of cultural pride in the African American community. But how did this holiday originate, and what is its broader cultural significance?

Kwanzaa: Black Power and the Making of the African-American Holiday Tradition explores the political beginning and later expansion of Kwanzaa, from its start as a Black Power holiday, to its current place as one of the most mainstream of the black holiday traditions. For those wanting to learn more about this alternative observance practiced by countless African Americans and how Kwanzaa fits into the larger black holiday tradition, Keith A. Mayes gives an accessible and definitive account of the movements and individuals that pushed to make this annual celebration a reality, and shows how African-Americans brought the black freedom struggle to the American calendar.

Clear and thoughtful, Kwanzaa is the perfect introduction to what is now the quintessential African American holiday.

Galubel
This book looks at the root of the Kwanzaa phenomenon including historical antecedents. Instead of merely looking at Kwanzaa holiday practices, Professor Mayes delves into the political and social forces that led to the founding of Kwanzaa.
Small Black
This book was purchased for a family member. He found it to be detailed and said it contained all he wanted to know about this holiday. This publication meant all expectations!
Yannara
I ordered this book for my daughter who is off to college this year. It was easy to find and easy to order from Amazon
POFOD
The book begins by presenting an interesting history of holidays celebrated by African Americans such as Freedom Day January 1, 1808 abolition of the slave trade. Yet, the interjection of the author's opinions disrupts the flow of the information throughout the presentation of this work of nonfiction. For example, he claims Karenga created Kwanzaa to replace Christmas. Yet, he has presented no evidence written or spoken that states emphatically that the holiday was meant to replace Christmas. For instance, the author states on page 91. "On the eve of December 24, 1966, "Us members receive instructions from Karenga to ignore Christmas as the first official Kwanzaa holiday week approached." This statement suggest that Karenga does not want his members to celebrate Christmas, but does not prove in any way that Kwanzaa was created to replace Christmas. In other words, many of the conclusions of the book are contrived and hokey.

However, I highly recommend this book to readers who are interested in the leaders of the Black power movement who roiled American society. The spate of details provided by the writer will overwhelm you, the author has assembled a rare collection of documents. Too many works in this area are disingenuous, but the information here is revealing. Moreover, when the authors focuses on the facts, the book is truly ostentatious. Furthermore, he extends the purview of Kwanzaa, by providing a history of the evolution of the holiday to its present form. The effulgence of the book is that it expands the understanding of Kwanzaa and its origin. Moreover, the evidence presented will help mollify some of the critics of the holiday, especially in the African American community. In fact some people who were insipid about Kwanzaa may be inspired to join the celebration. Finally, the author summarizes the importance of Kwanzaa in sanguine manner, by emphasizing its importance in the holiday tradition in the United States.
Maximilianishe
very strong book and well documented and its very detailed
and speaks directly on the significance of the holiday and how important book,etc.. a strong book and its very much a treasure.
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