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eBook Becoming Animal: An Earthly Cosmology ePub

by David Abram

eBook Becoming Animal: An Earthly Cosmology ePub
Author: David Abram
Language: English
ISBN: 0375421718
ISBN13: 978-0375421716
Publisher: Pantheon; 1 edition (August 24, 2010)
Pages: 336
Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 465
Formats: lrf azw docx mbr
ePub file: 1204 kb
Fb2 file: 1938 kb

Abram says "this is a book about becoming a two-legged animal, entirely a part of the . First let me come out and say, I really loved David Abrams book Becoming Animal

First let me come out and say, I really loved David Abrams book Becoming Animal. I loved how eloquently it argued against philosophies of transcendence which are such an important part of most organized western religions, I loved how David described and conjured up the mystery of the natural world, and perhaps most of all I loved how he reminded us, so powerfully, of the innately expressive and conscious filled the natural world truly is.

David Abram's first book, The Spell of the Sensuous, hailed as revolutionary by the Los Angeles Times, as daring  .

David Abram's first book, The Spell of the Sensuous, hailed as revolutionary by the Los Angeles Times, as daring and truly original by Science, has become a classic of environmental literature. Now he returns with a startling exploration of our human entanglement with the rest of nature. David Abram is an ecologist, anthropologist, and philosopher who lectures and teaches widely around the world.

Becoming Animal book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Becoming Animal: An Earthly Cosmology as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Автор: Abram David Название: Becoming Animal: An Earthly Cosmology Издательство .

2010 Язык: ENG Поставляется из: США Описание: David Abrams first book, The Spell. Now Abram returns with a startling exploration of our human entanglement with the rest of nature.

Электронная книга "Becoming Animal: An Earthly Cosmology", David Abram. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Becoming Animal: An Earthly Cosmology" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

In his new book, Becoming Animal, Abram is on a particularly complicated, mystical, and almost messianic mission . The book is not, however, purely a call to the wild. Abram has a clear sense of the world we’re in and why it exists.

In his new book, Becoming Animal, Abram is on a particularly complicated, mystical, and almost messianic mission: He wants to reclaim creatureness -our animal senses and subjectivity-in a society in thrall to the cult of the expertise and the tyranny of machines. He hopes to reintroduce us to a pungent, unpredictable world of resplendent weirdness.

David Abram's first book, The Spell of the Sensuous has become a classic of environmental literature. Now he returns with a startling exploration of our human entanglement with the rest of nature

David Abram's first book, The Spell of the Sensuous has become a classic of environmental literature.

Abram’s new book, Becoming Animal: An Earthly Cosmology, will be enjoyed by those who are already familiar with Abram and those who are new to his work and his adventurous and vivid style. It is relevant to multiple ijields of study that engage environmental issues, including nature writing and ecological literary criticism (eco-criticism), eco-phenomenology, indigenous studies, religion and ecology, and cosmology

In 2010 Abram published Becoming Animal: An Earthly Cosmology, which was the sole runner-up for the inaugural PEN Edward O. Wilson Award for Literary Science Writing, and a finalist for the Orion Book Award.

In 2010 Abram published Becoming Animal: An Earthly Cosmology, which was the sole runner-up for the inaugural PEN Edward O.

David Abram is an American philosopher, cultural ecologist, and performance artist, best known for his work .

David Abram is an American philosopher, cultural ecologist, and performance artist, best known for his work bridging the philosophical tradition of phenomenology with environmental and ecological issues.

David Abram’s first book, The Spell of the Sensuous—hailed as “revolutionary” by the Los Angeles Times, as “daring and truly original” by Science—has become a classic of environmental literature. Now Abram returns with a startling exploration of our human entanglement with the rest of nature. As the climate veers toward catastrophe, the innumerable losses cascading through the biosphere make vividly evident the need for a metamorphosis in our relation to the living land. For too long we’ve inured ourselves to the wild intelligence of our muscled flesh, taking our primary truths from technologies that hold the living world at a distance. This book subverts that distance, drawing readers ever deeper into their animal senses in order to explore, from within, the elemental kinship between the body and the breathing Earth. The shapeshifting of ravens, the erotic nature of gravity, the eloquence of thunder, the pleasures of being edible: all have their place in Abram’s investigation. He shows that from the awakened perspective of the human animal, awareness (or mind) is not an exclusive possession of our species but a lucid quality of the biosphere itself—a quality in which we, along with the oaks and the spiders, steadily participate. With the audacity of its vision and the luminosity of its prose, Becoming Animal sets a new benchmark for the human appraisal of our place in the whole.

Kalrajas
Both this, and David Abram's more scholarly "The Spell of the Sensuous", are fine works sharing my book shelf with Annie Dillard's "Pilgrim at Tinker Creek" and "Teaching a Stone to Talk", my collection of "Orion" magazines, the poems of Mary Oliver and the works of Donald McCaig. I have great respect for his knowledge of and use of the English language and most of all, the wisdom he imparts in his writings, pouring it into one's mind seemingly joyfully and effortlessly, equivalently. We, who have gentle and kind feelings for this planet, but are a part of its ravaging, should try to absorb Abram's words seriously and with impassioned rapture, and learn to live by them, and feel as if in Elysium.
Tantil
Rarely do I finish a book and turn to the beginning to start all over again...Becoming Animal is a poetic adventure into the roots of our being-ness ...I have a love for and an affinity with the natural world however I had not considered the life of shadows or the consciousness of mountains or the countless ways in which David Abram helped to open my senses to the teeming nature of nature all around me. I am grateful for being able to give pause to savor passages like: "We give ourselves precious little chance to taste this nourishment that springs up into us whenever we touch the ground, and so it's hardly surprising that we've forgotten the erotic nature of gravity, and the enlivening pleasure of earthly contact." or this: ..."each stone, each gust of wind, each termite-ridden log or gliding sea turtle harbors and bodies forth a creativity that resists all definition."
Kelerius
David Abram's *Becoming Animal: An Earthly Cosmology*

This book is so poetically beautiful and startling that it's hard to describe. Abram says "this is a book about becoming a two-legged animal, entirely a part of the animate world whose life swells within and unfolds all around us." But it's not at all suggesting that we unleash our inner beasts. Rather, Abram vividly reminds us that our minds are embodied -- not simply in physical brains but in material bodies -- bodies that co-evolved with our planet and all other life-forms that inhabit it.

The best way that I can sum up this point is to say that if the mind can't be separated from the body and the body can't be separated from the world, then the mind can't be separated from the world. This insight problematizes, to say the least, the scientific pretension to objectivity, which depends on a separation between humans and the world (and mind and body) that does not exist. Abram is respectful of modern science and understands that we cannot dispense with it, but he provides an accounting of the price that we pay for being unbalanced in favor of scientific thinking and its "epistemology of domination and control" (to borrow a phrase from philosopher Jim Cheney).

Abram makes a compelling case that we must begin to think and feel differently about our relationship with the earth (and its myriad inhabitants) in order to shift our trajectory away from further destruction toward recovery. In doing so, he respectfully and responsibly draws on the wisdom of indigenous cultures (again, without repudiating modernity altogether).

My comments here try to capture a central point of this book, but they fall short by making the book seem merely abstract and philosophical. In fact, the book is very concrete and full of engaging personal stories. It's one of the most interesting and provocative books I've ever read.

I might add that this book makes a nice complement to Thomas Nagel's *Mind and Cosmos*, which I have reviewed here: http://www.amazon.com/review/R2RZM8S91AK8GR
Vareyma
First let me come out and say, I really loved David Abrams book Becoming Animal. I loved how eloquently it argued against philosophies of transcendence which are such an important part of most organized western religions, I loved how David described and conjured up the mystery of the natural world, and perhaps most of all I loved how he reminded us, so powerfully, of the innately expressive and conscious filled the natural world truly is. Many of his descriptions of this world reminded me of my own time studying with Navajo healers.
So why not five stars? I wish I could give it 4.5 stars.
As I said in the title of this review, Becoming Animal is almost perfect. It also has several not to trivial problems.
One, Abram rails against those who criticize writers who romanticize the hunter/gatherer - indigenous cultures of the world and of the past. He points out, in a lengthy footnote, how those same critics tend to romanticize the worlds of ancient Greece and Rome, yet shower contempt on those who write favorably about indigenous cultures. And I could not agree more strongly. Yet, Abram does romanticize these worlds. As beautifully as he extols their power and their connection with earth-based life, he totally ignores their own internal pressures to conform, as well as their often savage cruelty they visit upon their neighbors. In the book Radical Hope: Ethics in the Face of Cultural Devastation, Jonathan Lear deftly describes the unceasing violence visited upon the Crow Nation by their traditional and more powerful enemy the Lakota. And this is one of countless stories of cultures dedicated to frequent violence and mindless animosity (not that are free of these very same vicissitudes). Often the reticence of these societies to innovate is a consequence of internal pressures to conform. Such stressors to internally conform in these societies often become unbreakable obstacles to innovation.
One of the core themes of Becoming Animal is the rootedness these traditional societies have with the Earth on which they live. But many of these same societies lack this rootedness, including several Abram mentions. The life on the high plains of such tribes as the Cheyenne and Lakota were very recent phenomena made possible by the acquisition of the horse, introduced into the Americas by the Spanish. Life on the high plains began with these tribes at around the same time it began with the European invaders. Many of these tribal groups are highly nomadic. The Navajo entered the 4 Corners region of the US around 1450 after a long migration from Arctic Canada beginning around 1300. They arrived in the Southwest not so long before the Spanish entered that same region. Thus the argument for ageless rootedness often falls apart.And these are just several of hundreds of possible examples.
Toward the end of the book, Abram unfortunately unleashes an attack on evolutionary theory by setting up a straw man hypothesis based on his projection that the science of evolution is too mechanistic and unwelcome to the complex web of inter-communication that he observes in the natural world. But such mechanistic models are exactly what modern science has, itself, rebuked. While the statistical incidence of mutation is random, how these random changes manifest and evolve in the complex eco-systems of the planet are entirely a consequence of the very same, rich and complex layers of inter-communication described and extolled so lovingly by Abram. Her really fails to get his critique right and the book suffers as a result.
Finally, his criticisms of the cartesian world are uncompelling. The world he correctly criticizes is, itself, a consequence of cultural and historical memes that go far deeper in the human story than what Abram describes. More compelling and evidence based critiques are raised by Morris Berman (see: Wandering God and my own writings, Liberation from the Lie. The emergence of mechanistic, soulless models was rooted in far deeper human cultural soil than what Abram presents in this book. I recommend each of these books for a more sweeping and compelling accounts for the degradation of the planets and social/individual life that resulted from the abandonment of the earthcentric life that forms the centerpiece of this book.
Abram is fantastic as a writer of narrative and some of my favorite passages are taken, directly, from his own life. I really loved his description of his kayaking off the coast of Alaska and encountering a colony of sea lions and how he responded to their sudden appearance with such brilliant and connected expression,. The personal quality of this book is really terrific.
But sometimes his use of language becomes too labored and flowery. Sometimes, it sounded strained, like he was working too hard to convince the reader of how smart and sensitive he is.
Nonetheless, this is an extremely valuable book and I really admire Abram for his originality, the challenge of the subject matter, and the power of this critically important message. This is a book that we need to read and absorb.
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