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eBook Democracy in Europe ePub

by Larry Siedentop

eBook Democracy in Europe ePub
Author: Larry Siedentop
Language: English
ISBN: 0231123779
ISBN13: 978-0231123778
Publisher: Columbia University Press (April 15, 2002)
Pages: 272
Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 962
Formats: azw mbr lrf rtf
ePub file: 1374 kb
Fb2 file: 1401 kb

Can the European Union foster greater democracy in Europe, and so. .Larry Siedentop is a lecturer in Politics at Keble College and current chair of the Oxford politics faculty. His previous books include TOCQUEVILLE

Larry Siedentop is a lecturer in Politics at Keble College and current chair of the Oxford politics faculty. His previous books include TOCQUEVILLE. He has also written the introduction to Guizot's HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION IN EUROPE for Penguin Classics.

Sir Larry Alan Siedentop CBE (born 24 May 1936) is an American-born British political philosopher with a special interest in 19th-century French liberalism. He is the author of Democracy in Europe and an occasional contributor to several major British daily newspapers, including the Financial Times and The Times

Larry Siedentop is a lecturer in Politics at Keble College and current chair of the Oxford politics faculty. Библиографические данные.

Larry Siedentop is a lecturer in Politics at Keble College and current chair of the Oxford politics faculty.

Democracy in Europe book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Democracy in Europe as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Britain and much of Europe is hynptized by the struggle between.

Overall the book is a valuable contribution to the European debate and essential reading for anyone who cares about the future of the European Project and of the Western world in general.

Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Overall the book is a valuable contribution to the European debate and essential reading for anyone who cares about the future of the European Project and of the Western world in general. 4 people found this helpful.

His conclusion is that the right basis for the European Union should be "liberal constitutionalism", something like the United States' pattern. Paperback: 288 pages. Publisher: Penguin UK (July 3, 2001).

Taking inspiration from the heated discussions that preceded the birth of federal government in the United States, Larry Siedentop investigates what we can reasonably expect and what we have to fear from a united Europe. Despite the profound hostility between skeptics and proponents of a united Europe, the outlines of serious public debate have barely been sketched.

item 3 Democracy in Europe, Siedentop, Larry, Used; Good Book -Democracy in Europe, Siedentop . An important book concerning the state of politics and why. Everyone with an interest in the future of the EU should read this book. It is readable and absorbing.

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Europe has waited far too long for this kind of scrutiny. Larry Siedentop is a faculty lecturer in political thought at the University of Oxford and a fellow of Keble College. He is also the author of Tocqueville. The Economist A thrilling, compulsively readable book about constitutional reform in the European Union. is an eloquent call on the leaders of Europe to rise to the task of creating a proper democratic framework for the political construction of new Europe.

Taking inspiration from the heated discussions that preceded the birth of federal government in the United States, Larry Siedentop investigates what we can reasonably expect and what we have to fear from a united Europe. Despite the profound hostility between skeptics and proponents of a united Europe, the outlines of serious public debate have barely been sketched. While skeptics talk of national sovereignty and invoke the spirit of wartime resistance, Europhiles embrace the idealism of eurozones and sound economic management.Larry Siedentop examines whether representative government is feasible across the vast physical scale and human diversity of Europe. He explores the threat to local autonomy and individual freedom, and he anatomizes the widely different political cultures of Britain, France, and Germany. He balances throughout an understanding of the great theorists of supranational government, especially Montesquieu and De Tocqueville, with a deep, though critical, appreciation of contemporary Europe. Siedentop argues that it is only on a publicly discussed and commonly agreed upon constitution that one can hope to build a democratic Europe equal to the pressures it will have to withstand.
Dorizius
This is a most impressive book. Drawing lessons from the American experience of creating a continental, federal union and inspired by 19th Century French liberals such as Tocqueville and Guizot, Siedentop takes a skepticial (but sympathetic) look at the current project to create a "United States of Europe". The book is grand (even majestic) in its scope and (deliberately) provocative in its claims. The author is a political theorist and intellectual historian, which is the key to its appeal. There are countless books on the EU out there, written by political scientists and economist, full of arcane details and figures. This book, by contrast, is written from a larger perspective, drawing on the author's apparently vast knowledge of European social, cultural and intellectual life. The style is engaging and straightforward. The book will appeal most to journalists and very senior bureaucrats, I think. (Judging by the endorsements on the cover, this is indeed the case.) It will probably be judged too sweeping and general by most academic specialists and too intellectual and abstract by most ordinary readers. It is a work of popular scholarship or "high journalism", in the highest and best sense of that term. There is still an appreciation for such things among British journalists (although it is diminishing), unlike their American cousins, for whom this book will probably seem far too substantial to engage their attention for long. The principal villains of the piece are the French elites, who (the author alleges) have so far successfully imposed an elitist, centralist, statist vision on the construction of the European Union. The Germans have been too politically weak and self-absorbed to resist this aggressive French agenda, and the British are trapped in their own social and constitutional ancien regime, unable to offer any practical alternatives to their traditional rivals. So Siedentop turns to American federalism for an alternative conception of how the New Europe should develop. He is a Tocquevillian liberal who favors decentralization spiced with Rousseauian democratic republicanism. One of his principal complaints about the debate on Europe is that economics has completely eclipsed the political, resulting in a union that is politically retarded and dangerous (one of his favorite words). At the very least, his assessment of the many dangers on the road to union in Europe deserves very serious consideration. Hopefully, it will help to raise the standard of debate on its future course.
Overall, a highly stimulating, engaging, insightful book that no one who is even remotely interested in the future of Europe can afford to overlook.
ℓo√ﻉ
In a European context sometimes dominated by the endless and tediously ideological debate "Social Model versus Ultra-Liberalism", Siedentop's contribution is refreshing in it's high mindedness and breadth of scope. In this sense he can claim to follow in Tocqueville's footsteps.

In the European Union and the United States he sees the flag bearers of the ideals of Occidental Liberalism in its classical sense, of the principles of the Enlightenment. In particular he emphasises the importance of Individualism and Christianity's role in its appearance in Europe. Individualism he contrasts with Tribalism. Whereas in an Individualistic society the Individual is the indivisible "atom", in a Tribal society the Family (in a sense closer to Extended Family, or Clan) is the atom. Examples of Tribal or Clannish societies are Sicily or the Middle East. They are places where classical Liberalism does not yet prevail. Examples of Individualistic societies are the US and Western Europe. They are places where classical Liberalism prevails.

Siedentop takes this as the starting point and then argues for what he believes is the best way to preserve and advance what he considers as the Great Western Liberal Project. He supports this first general and rather abstract part of the book with very interesting historical arguments.

The value of the book therefore resides mostly not in the actual solutions and directions it proposes (a European Senate, the EU as a Federal superstate modeled on the US, avoiding French dirigisme) but in the way it frames the problems. In other words the questions raised are far more interesting than the answers.

Among the recurring themes in the book is the argument against French dirigisme, centralisation and bureaucratic unaccountability. It is a compliment to the depth of his political and historical thought (especially as an American living in the UK) that he does not mean this as an attack on the French system *in France*, but a warning against a transplant to Brussels. He simply claims that while French society has had ample time to adapt to a strong, heavy handed government, notably by evolving a strong and extremely active and implicated civil society, European society has not. European civil society and citizenry do not yet have the leverage to counterbalance the excesses of an overly bureaucratic, non-transparent central government.

The French system however, has the advantage that it is able to act when needed, and this is no small virtue, especially in view of recent shameful cases of Euro-paralysis such as in the Bosnian genocide.

Another easy criticism one can bring is the fact that Siedentop presents the Family as evil and as an obstacle to the inevitable march of progress. This will likely not make him many friends in many EU countries such as notably Poland, Italy, or soon, Romania. He should have probably toned down his anti-family rhetoric, in the same way that he toned down his anti-dirigiste rhetoric.

The Big Questions emerging at the end of the book are two:

How can we find a compromise between paralysis and unaccountability? The French system can act, but it can often lose touch with the people resulting in violent uprisings (some people may call these "system failures", other people may simply call them "feedback").

How can we find a compromise between the family (as in heartwarming Italian Restaurant advertising) and the family (as in brutal Iraqi or Pakistani tribal wars), or equivalently between individualism as freedom and individualism as alienation.

Overall the book is a valuable contribution to the European debate and essential reading for anyone who cares about the future of the European Project and of the Western world in general.
Chinon
I bought this book because I believed it would be an American's recommendations to a rising European Union.
Instead, it is a British book written by an American who has become more or less British who tries to show the British that they have something to offer Europe if they came to believe more in the British way themselves.
There are some interesting thoughts in Siedentop's book, but on the whole, I thought it was rather boring and irrelevant to me as a Dane.
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