lind-peinture
» » The Invisible Invaders: The Story of the Emerging Age of Viruses

eBook The Invisible Invaders: The Story of the Emerging Age of Viruses ePub

by Peter Radetsky

eBook The Invisible Invaders: The Story of the Emerging Age of Viruses ePub
Author: Peter Radetsky
Language: English
ISBN: 0316732168
ISBN13: 978-0316732161
Publisher: Little Brown & Co; 1st edition (January 1, 1991)
Pages: 415
Category: Medicine & Health Sciences
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 815
Formats: azw docx txt lrf
ePub file: 1500 kb
Fb2 file: 1590 kb

The Invisible Invaders book.

The Invisible Invaders book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Invisible Invaders: The Story Of The Emerging Age Of Viruses.

The Invisible Invaders: Viruses and the Scientists Who Pursue Them (Invisible Invaders). I highly recommend it, as it isn't that old (1991,1994) and much of it is still valid today. Allergic to the Twentieth Century: The Explosion in Environmental Allergies-From Sick Buildings to Multiple Chemical Sensitivity. Bill Phillips, Peter Radetsky.

Invisible Invaders : The Story of the Emerging Age of Viruses. This book chronicles the history of mankind's "discovery" of the world of viruses, from the time Edward Jenner developed the smallpox vaccine till the present. The drama unfolds as we get to know the scientists responsible for the discoveries, and their efforts to produce successful vaccines against some of the plagues of the day: Tobacco Mosaic Virus, Smallpox, Rabies, Polio, the Common Cold, AIDS, Epstein-Barr, Influenza, Hepatitis, Herpes, and Cancer are the featured performers here.

For better or worse, we're stuck with viruses: they are ubiquitous, as old as any life form on the planet, and-other than humanity itself-perhaps the only agent posing a threat to our very existence.

The invisible invaders. the story of the emerging age of viruses. 1st ed. by Peter Radetsky. Published 1991 by Little, Brown in Boston.

Either way, the invisible invaders have risen to new prominence in the age of AIDS, but, as Radetsky (coauthor, Peak Condition, 1986) reminds us, viruses have been around fora long, long time

Either way, the invisible invaders have risen to new prominence in the age of AIDS, but, as Radetsky (coauthor, Peak Condition, 1986) reminds us, viruses have been around fora long, long time. Viruses are so weird and wily that they fairly cry out for similes and metaphors when you write about them

The invisible invaders. Viruses are so weird and wily that they fairly cry out for similes and metaphors when you write about them. Viruses are like "minute, wayward, and unruly parts of ourselves - something like adventurous teenagers who have fled the nest but just can't resist coming back home at every opportunity," writes Peter Radetsky in a typical passage from "The Invisible Invaders.

Emerging Viruses in Human Populations by Tabor, Edward (Hardback book, 2006). Emerging Viruses in Human Populations by Tabor, Edward (Hardback book, 2006). Ships in a business day with tracking.

Exploring the world of viral research, the author discusses the scientist's competition to gain recognition for discoveries and introduces readers to leaders in the state of the art of viral research
Tansino
The Invisible Invaders

Peter Radetsky holds a Ph.D. in creative writing and literature, and teaches in the science communication program at the University of California at Santa Cruz. He is a frequent contributor to ‘Discover’ magazine. This 1991 book of 413 pages has a Contents, 16 chapters in 4 Parts, Sources, and Index. There are 8 pages of photographs after pages 144 and 272. The ‘Preface’ remarks that most people know little about viruses, they are unlike bacterial infections which respond to antibiotics. This book will explain the threats and dangers. Not so long ago it seemed likely that medical science could prevent infectious diseases (‘Introduction’). Since then they learned how viruses can cause cancer and AIDS, and about 80% of all acute illnesses. Yellow fever, polio, influenza, smallpox, hepatitis, viral pneumonia, mononucleosis, chronic fatigue syndrome, rabies, and herpes are other examples.

The knowledge of viruses is fairly modern (p.6). Vaccines create antibodies that attack viruses to make them harmless. Some viruses mutate or change to avoid antibodies, such as the flu viruses. So too the cold virus (p.11). This book will explain the research being done in areas like molecular biology and genetic engineering. [I found some chapters more understandable than others.] Part I tells about the ‘Beginnings’ in medical science, when medicine was based on ancient theories rather than evidence. Edward Jenner’s vaccination reduced smallpox. Louis Pasteur expanded knowledge in treating diseases. They learned about bacteria and viruses. Part II discusses ‘The Science of Virology’ where viruses were studied. DNA and RNA were discovered. The electron microscope allowed viewing viruses and identifying them. Creating a polio vaccine virtually eliminated it from the Western world.

Part III tells about modern studies of viruses and the effects of DNA. New viruses were found (the Epstein-Barr virus). Some viruses cause cancer but are regional. The flu pandemic sickened tens of millions. Retroviruses can cause cancer. Part IV discusses ongoing research into viruses. They can produce insulin, interferon, enzymes such as rennin. Freeze-dried vaccinia can be used in third-world countries. If it can carry hepatitis B antigens it would benefit millions. Cancer results from normal cells that change into a dangerous form due to a virus. Some oncogenes are part of normal cells which can turn cancerous.

This is an interesting book but the later chapters may not interest the general reader.
Hellstaff
I am sorry to see that this book is out of print. I highly recommend it, as it isn't that old (1991,1994) and much of it is still valid today. Radetsky did fantastic job with the history of viral research, on the mainly men who worked on finding these invisible 'monsters' who can wreck such havoc on the human race. The book reads quickly and well, and it follows a chronological pattern that allows the reader to understand what had to happen before to allow certain discoveries to occur. I would recommend that curious readers check for this book in a local university library, and that the publishers will rethink updating this book for the many who I am sure are interested in reading this type of nonfiction. Karen Sadler, Science Education, University of Pittsburgh
Rindyt
I really loved this book. I found it interesting because it did not dumb down information. The author clearly had an understanding of the audience it was geared for, and did not give the reader the feeling that they were stupid. I would reccommend this book to anyone who is interested in the scientific historical look at viruses.
lind-peinture.fr
© All right reserved. 2017-2020
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
eBooks are provided for reference only