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eBook The Mind Made Flesh: Essays from the Frontiers of Psychology and Evolution ePub

by Nicholas Humphrey

eBook The Mind Made Flesh: Essays from the Frontiers of Psychology and Evolution ePub
Author: Nicholas Humphrey
Language: English
ISBN: 0192802275
ISBN13: 978-0192802279
Publisher: Oxford University Press (February 13, 2003)
Pages: 384
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 685
Formats: azw doc mbr lrf
ePub file: 1506 kb
Fb2 file: 1154 kb

Nicholas Keynes Humphrey (born 27 March 1943) is an English neuropsychologist, based in. .

Nicholas Keynes Humphrey (born 27 March 1943) is an English neuropsychologist, based in Cambridge, who is known for his work on the evolution of primate intelligence and consciousness. His interests are wide-ranging. His writings on consciousness continued in The Mind Made Flesh: Essays from the Frontiers of Evolution and Psychology (2002), Seeing Red: A Study in Consciousness (2006), and most recently Soul Dust: the Magic of Consciousness (2011). In this last book he puts forward a radical new theory.

PDF On Jan 1, 2002, Nicholas Humphrey and others published The Mind Made Flesh: Essays From the . All content in this area was uploaded by Nicholas Humphrey on Jun 23, 2016.

PDF On Jan 1, 2002, Nicholas Humphrey and others published The Mind Made Flesh: Essays From the Frontiers of Psychology and Evolution. First, just because products and systems exhibit attractors and goals does not automatically mean they invite human action.

His book & made flesh' is a book which every atheist should read at some point of their lives, even if the .

His book & made flesh' is a book which every atheist should read at some point of their lives, even if the things really interesting an atheist comes only after the middle of the book. This book is fantastic journey in the world of workings of the mind and cognition. As said, the real pearls are in the other half of the book, but they are really worth waiting. The final chapters of the book are real gems when psychologist Nicholas Humphrey tells how the religions misuse the trust of children and mold their minds into directions they want. Th 20. chapter called "What Shall We Tell the Children" is a moving appeal for the preservation of the intellectual integrity of the children.

Nicholas Humphrey's writings about the evolution of the mind have done much to set the agenda for contemporary psychology

Nicholas Humphrey's writings about the evolution of the mind have done much to set the agenda for contemporary psychology.

The Mind Made Flesh book. Nicholas Humphrey's writings about the evolution of the mind have done much to set the agenda for contemporary psychology.

Sociology Nicholas Humphrey.

The mind made flesh: frontiers of psychology and evolution. oceedings{Humphrey2002TheMM, title {The mind made flesh: frontiers of psychology and evolution}, author {Nicholas Humphrey}, year {2002} }. Nicholas Humphrey.

Oxford University Press (2003). We isolate retribution by investigating judgments about punishing animals, which allows us to remove general deterrence from consideration. Studies 2 and 3 document a victim identity effect, such that the greater the perceived loss from a violent animal attack, the greater the belief that the culprit deserves to be killed. About the Author: Consciousness Regained: Chapters in the.

The Mind Made Flesh: Essays from the Frontiers of Psychology and Evolution. The British psychologist Stuart Sutherland, in his Dictionary of Psychology in 1989, gave a curiously sardonic definition of consciousness

The Mind Made Flesh: Essays from the Frontiers of Psychology and Evolution. Oxford University Press. The British psychologist Stuart Sutherland, in his Dictionary of Psychology in 1989, gave a curiously sardonic definition of consciousness. Consciousness is a fascinating but elusive phenomenon; it is impossible to specify what it is, what it does, or why it evolved. Nothing worth reading has been written about it. 3 You may be surprised-or maybe not-to hear how well this definition has gone down with pundits.

Nicholas Humphrey's writings about the evolution of the mind have done much to set the agenda for contemporary psychology. Here, in a series of riveting essays, he invites us to 'take another look' at a variety of the central and not-so-central issues: the evolution of consciousness, the nature of the self, multiple personality disorder, the placebo effect, cave art, religious miracles, medieval animal trials, the seductions of dictatorship, and much more.
Dobpota
Humphrey's collection of many years' provides a lively insight into many aspects of life. Divided into five general topical areas, the essay range over the evolution of human cognition, perception, religion, the trials and execution of animals and emotion. Humphey is a major thinker. Add his fine prose skills to the many thought experiments in this book and you have a provocative collection to enjoy. There is much in here to inspire repeated reading.
Three of the essays are of significant import, requiring serious reflection on Humphrey's concepts. What level had human cognition reached when "cavemen" painted the walls of Chauvet? [actually, two essays address this topic] Was Jesus a conjurer? And, foremost in significance, "What Shall We Tell the Children?". The first question derives from the well-known case of the child Nadia who proved an artistic prodigy. She developed an outstanding ability to draw animals by the age of four. Her renditions of horses exceed the attempts of many adult sketchers. Humphrey argues that Nadia's minimal language skills offer a clue to how this talent developed. He suggests the animal drawings in French and Iberian caves suggest reconsideration of how and when human cognitive skills developed and whether artistic skills preceded those of language.
In discussing Jesus' role in his own society, Humphrey suggests The Redeemer had grown up in a society that anticipated the emergence of a Messiah. In "Behold the Man," Humphrey addresses the social and psychological" roots leading to the myth of Jesus' divinity. He sees the Jesus myth as "setting the stage for all subsequent paranormal phenomena in Western culture . . . outside as well as inside a specifically religious context." It's a challenging task he's set himself, but Humphrey fulfills it with rational evidence. Of primary importance is the idea that "Jesus himself believed he was the real thing," allowing him to carry off the proposition that he enjoyed special powers. That confidence imparted the belief to those he encountered in every community but one, his own. Humphrey explains why that differential helps undermine the myth of divinity. Why wasn't Jesus acceptance universal?
In "What Shall We Tell the Children?", Humphrey suggests one of his most challenging ideas. How far should parents be allowed to go in forming a child's opinions and beliefs. He strongly urges that "false beliefs" must not be imposed on children if their rights as individuals are thereby curtailed. He argues that pre-emptive action in protecting children's rights is not an extreme action. His solution is universal education in science - not scientific dogmas, but the methods of observation, testing and critical thinking. No dogma ever withstands these tools in combination.
Three [four!] summaries hardly address the value of this collection. The remainder, some of which are surprisingly brief, are all a challenge to think along novel lines or reassess old ideas. Are we Stone Age people living in a Space Age or a Computer Age? Why is dictatorship attractive to many - even those living within one? What is the Mind/Body problem and is there an answer to it? What is altruism and how does it work in human society? How and why does a placebo work in curing illness? These and many other issues are addressed in this anthology, keeping the reader's constant attention. There are many challenges here, and no disappointments. Humphrey's insights are worth considering and his effective presentation makes this book a fine addition to anyone's library.
Katishi
There is no doubt that Humphrey is a highly educated and accomplished academic. There is also no doubt that he grew up in Hampstead and likes the Guardian - his communist leanings too often eclipse his undoubted capacity for interesting and valuable insight. For example, in this book he praises Engel's _Dialectics of Nature_ in a serious manner and describes it as "remarkable," but in the next sentence gives a trite brush off to Adam Smith (trite and wrong, as it happens.) His writing style seems to this reader to be just a little too modern and informal; there is nothing wrong with informality, but Humphrey has a knack for writing in a way that seems to verge on the pompous, portentious and to drop too many names. His distinguished record means that he can easily afford to wear his learning much more lightly. However, within the covers of the book there are some very interesting ideas. Like many books on evolution, many of these come as no surpise to anyone who has studied evolutionary biology at school, but there are a few that almost justify buying the book. For example, his theory of an evolutionary explanation of humanity's tolerance for, and occasional adulation for dictators and tyrants is original and persuasive. (The theory is that it results from two evolutionary strategies, to follow the successful individual and to follow the majority, together with a dose of chance as to who gets followed.) If this book was shorter, less discursive and less showy it would be much better. As it stands it is good in parts but frustrating in style and prolixity.
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