lind-peinture
» » Electing Justice: Fixing the Supreme Court Nomination Process

eBook Electing Justice: Fixing the Supreme Court Nomination Process ePub

by Richard Davis

eBook Electing Justice: Fixing the Supreme Court Nomination Process ePub
Author: Richard Davis
Language: English
ISBN: 0195181093
ISBN13: 978-0195181098
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (March 10, 2005)
Pages: 224
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 411
Formats: lit rtf mobi txt
ePub file: 1640 kb
Fb2 file: 1190 kb

Electing Justice is an impressive achievement

This volume would be an ideal choice for an advanced undergraduate course on judicial politics and perhaps as a supplementary text for a seminar on presidential and/or legislative politics. Electing Justice is an impressive achievement. Not only does Davis tackle a subject of extreme interest and concern to scholars and policy makers alike; he also takes the important step of developing the implications of his study-in the form of intriguing recommendations about how to reform the nomination process.

Includes bibliographical references and index. Traditional versus new players - The politics of judicial selection - How the process broke : the transformation of the Supreme Court appointment process - New roles for external players - Today's nomination process : the battle over image - Reforming the process.

Home Browse Books Book details, Electing Justice: Fixing the Supreme Court. Electing Justice: Fixing the Supreme Court Nomination Process. Davis discusses the increasing role of interest groups, the press, and the public, whose role is not prescribed in the Constitution, in the selection and confirmation of Supreme Court justices and how it affects the process. First he examines in detail the history and nature of the process,then he looks at the role and impact of other players.

In Electing Justice, Richard Davis reveals how from the late 1960s on, the role of these other players grew in intensity to the point that the nomination process would be unrecognizable to its original devisers, the Framers of the Constitution. The path to the Supreme Court now includes live television coverage of Senate hearings, "murder boards" in preparation for those hearings, a flood of press releases, television and radio advertisements, and public opinion polls. Unlike earlier, more elite-governed processes, the involvement of outside groups has become highly public and their.

Electing Justice book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Electing Justice: Fixing the Supreme Court Nomination Process as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

First he examines in detail the history and nature of the process .

First he examines in detail the history and nature of the process, then he looks at the role and impact of other players.

ELECTING JUSTICE Fixing the Supreme Court Nomination Process. 211 pp. Oxford University Press.

Davis discusses the increasing role of interest groups, the press, and the public, whose role is not prescribed in the Constitution, in the selection and confirmation of Supreme Court justices and how it affects the process. First he examines in detail the history and nature of the process, then he looks at the role and impact of other players.

Electing Justice : Fixing the Supreme Court Nomination Process. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Electing Justice : Fixing the Supreme Court Nomination Process.

Davis discusses the increasing role of interest groups, the press, and the public, whose role is not prescribed in the Constitution, in the selection and confirmation of Supreme Court justices and how it affects the process. First he examines in detail the history and nature of the process, then he looks at the role and impact of other players. His conclusions about how non-political actors affect the outcome of Supreme Court justice selection leads him at the end of his book to suggest controversial reforms and their prospects for success.
Vudomuro
It is hard to think of a more opportune time to read this new book on the strengths and weaknesses of the current Supreme Court nomination process. With the upcoming expected retirement of the Chief Justice, and the current foolishness occuring in the Senate over judicial filibusters, the solid and unemotional analysis offered by Professor Richard Davis is welcome to say the least. The author is very good in explaining how we have gotten into the current nomination mess: the role of the press in shaping nominee images; the incredible importance of interest groups and their energy in driving the process; the public expectation that nomination consideration will occur as much as possible in the open and not behind closed doors as in the past; and the role of nominations in reaffirming pertinent constitutencies for the groups, parties, and the pertinent president. In short, the process is no longer one conducted by the Senate in accordance with its own practices--instead each nomination (and the author does discuss particular examples such as Clarence Thomas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, David Souter, and of course Robert Bork) has become a major public event and battleground as the various players maneuver for advantage. What we have lost as a result of this "take no prisoners" approach to nominations is all too evident. While the author does not unleash any startling new insights, the book stands as perhaps the best introduction for anyone interested in gaining an understanding of how the process currently functions. The final chapter is devoted to "Reforming the Process," and the author examines a number of thoughtful proposals for mitigating the current mess. Alas, given the current political malaise floating over Washington, one can only reply: "dream on, Professor."
Yadon
Get ready for Chief Justice Roy Moore.
lind-peinture.fr
© All right reserved. 2017-2020
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
eBooks are provided for reference only