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eBook What You Need To Know About the Economics of Growing Old (But Were Afraid to Ask): A Provocative Reference Guide to the Economics of Aging ePub

by Teresa Ghilarducci

eBook What You Need To Know About the Economics of Growing Old (But Were Afraid to Ask): A Provocative Reference Guide to the Economics of Aging ePub
Author: Teresa Ghilarducci
Language: English
ISBN: 0268029636
ISBN13: 978-0268029630
Publisher: University of Notre Dame Press; 1 edition (September 15, 2004)
Pages: 152
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 745
Formats: mobi rtf docx lrf
ePub file: 1248 kb
Fb2 file: 1605 kb

With the aid of her Economics of Aging class, Teresa Ghilarducci has compiled this comprehensive sourcebook as a guide for politicians, economists, journalists, students, and ordinary Americans through the maze of This little book has a knack for asking the right questions.

With the aid of her Economics of Aging class, Teresa Ghilarducci has compiled this comprehensive sourcebook as a guide for politicians, economists, journalists, students, and ordinary Americans through the maze of This little book has a knack for asking the right questions. It’s on my 'A' list for information on retirement issues.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 129-133).

Growing Old (But Were Afraid to Ask) : A Provocative Reference Guide to the Economics of Aging.

What You Need to Know about the Economics of Growing Old (But Were Afraid to Ask) : A Provocative Reference Guide to the Economics of Aging.

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A Provocative Reference Guide To The Economics Of Aging. by Teresa Ghilarducci. Published December 30, 2004 by University of Notre Dame Press I am a baby boomer teaching students so young that their generation ha. . Published December 30, 2004 by University of Notre Dame Press. I am a baby boomer teaching students so young that their generation has not been named by the marketing profession yet. The Physical Object.

Why are older economies less productive? The answer is not, as one might suppose, that older workers ar.

Why are older economies less productive? The answer is not, as one might suppose, that older workers are. Though some capabilities, notably physical ones, deteriorate with age, the overall effect is not dramatic. But if, as seems to be the case, reluctance to embrace new technologies is a bigger issue, other goals should take priority-in particular, boosting competition.

With the aid of her Economics of Aging class, Teresa Ghilarducci has compiled this comprehensive sourcebook as a guide for politicians, economists, journalists, students, and ordinary Americans through the maze of Social Security and the economics of growing old i.

With the aid of her Economics of Aging class, Teresa Ghilarducci has compiled this comprehensive sourcebook as a guide for politicians, economists, journalists, students, and ordinary Americans through the maze of Social Security and the economics of growing old in America. This book will be valuable from the classroom to the halls of Congress. Simply put, it contains information everyone should know.

The Economics of Institutions: Avoiding the Open-Field Syndrome and the Perils of Path Dependence

The Economics of Institutions: Avoiding the Open-Field Syndrome and the Perils of Path Dependence. Acta Sociologica, Vol. 36, Issue. Professor Blaug then turns to the troublesome question of the logical status of welfare economics, giving the reader an understanding of the outstanding issues in the methodology of economics. This is followed by a series of case studies of leading economic controversies, which shows how controversies in economics may be illuminated by paying attention to questions of methodology. A final chapter draws the strands together and gives the author's view of what is wrong with modern economics.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and .

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Also considered are the effects of health and wealth on living arrangement decisions; the incentive effects of employer-provided pension plans; the degree of substitution between 401(k) plans and other employer-provided retirement saving arrangements; and the extent to which housing wealth determines how much the elderly save and consume. Two final studies use simulations that describe the implications of stylized economic models of behavior among the elderly. This timely volume will be of interest to anyone concerned with the economics of aging. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

What is the secret of their courage? Why do they need round-the-clock .

What is the secret of their courage? Why do they need round-the-clock flower shops? We shed light on the mysterious Russian soul. Such diversity sometimes surprises tourist, but you should know that Russia does not officially define any group as Asian. The main reason – Russians are more concerned with making ends meet, the soaring cost of utilities and food, and low wages. Why do Russians hate Muscovites?

"This little book has a knack for asking the right questions. It’s on my 'A' list for information on retirement issues.” ―John Turner, editor of Pay at Risk With the aid of her Economics of Aging class, Teresa Ghilarducci has compiled this comprehensive sourcebook as a guide for politicians, economists, journalists, students, and ordinary Americans through the maze of Social Security and the economics of growing old in America. What You Need to Know About the Economics of Growing Old (But Were Afraid to Ask) is divided into five sections. The first section addresses the status of the elderly and explores such issues as the average life expectancy and the number of elderly living in poverty. The second deals with the structure of the Social Security system and its disbursements of benefits. The third traces the economic path to old age. The fourth considers changing social norms, including the increase in the number of women in the workforce. The final section looks at what happens when the elderly work for pay. This book will be valuable from the classroom to the halls of Congress. Simply put, it contains information everyone should know. "Who says young people don't care about social security and economists can't write readable books. Teresa Ghilarducci and her band of college students have written an accessible, enlightening volume for anyone―from students to seniors, workers to policy makers, and journalists to academics―who wants the straight story about older people's quality of life and our retirement system. A must-read if you are retired or if you care about retiring some day." ―Clair Brown, Professor of Economics, University of California, Berkeley "Stories about the aging of the baby boom generation are often filled with hyperbole, pseudo facts, and just plain nonsense. Now, thanks to a volume edited by Teresa Ghilarducci, there is a clear and practical guide to the economic realities of an older America. It turns out that tomorrow's facts make a better story than the fantasies today's doomsayers are dreaming up." ―Richard C. Leone, President, The Century Foundation
melody of you
First, we need to disclose a couple of caveats. This book, which reads more like a series of short, insightful essays on various topics related to aging and Social Security, was written collectively by a group of students taught by Dr. Ghilarducci. In short, the good doctor (of economics) edited this fine little book; she did not write it. Second, it does not, given its small size, fully explore all of the aspects of the economics of growing old; however, it does provide the reader with an interesting demographic snapshot, albeit well within the context of the United States Social Security Program. That said, readers need to take note of this as they absorb its contents.

Nonetheless, this was a tremendous effort. The reader learns of the basic mechanics of the Social Security Program, as well as gets a clear picture of how the world of work has changed over the twentieth century and how that (greatly) impacts old age and retirement in the United States. The book engenders many thought-provoking questions and quite a few a-ha moments, and it actually helped me to solve a financial modeling problem that had been vexing me for a bit (see the essay 'Growth Rates Of Beneficiaries And Contributors' pp. 46-48).

My only gripes with the book are that the graphics should have been in full color, but then, this would have raised the cost of this excellent, student-inspired and originated effort. Also, there was not enough emphasis on household finances- especially from a life-cycle standpoint, and not much effort to tease out the various components of household net worth by income category (I'm thinking of the excellent work done by the Pew Charitable Trust in this regard, but perhaps such info was not available to the students). This would have helped to emphasize a number of points made in the book.

Overall, this is an easily digestible book that can be read cover to cover in a couple of hours on a lazy Saturday or Sunday (it actually took me two weeks to pore over it, but then, I would read a couple of chapters a day on my daily commute to and from work- one chapter going and another coming back). I also appreciate the handy bibliography and am grateful that the bibliography is fully referenced (making it easy to hunt down sources). As a parting shot, this book subtly alludes to looming problems which, sadly, American leaders have failed to address, and these problems are not the ones that often make for sensational headlines (such as the Social Security Trust Fund running out or debates about the privatization of Social Security, which, by the way, is coming a lot sooner than people think; the powers-that-be will start with a partial privatization, and then hit us between the eyes with a full-blown privatization gradually). Here's one very big hint: pay very close attention to Chapter 24- Thinking Ahead, and ask yourself what would likely happen to retirement income security when you saddle a bunch of kids with a bunch of debt, well before they get their first paying gig, and then rig the workplace against them by introducing job-stealing technologies, thus forcing them to acquire ever more skills training, at ever higher costs, with no financial assistance (other than more high-cost loans)?

That's something to think about...
Quashant
She has very valuable information here.
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