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eBook Burying the Black Sox: How Baseball's Cover-Up of the 1919 World Series Fix Almost Succeeded ePub

by Gene Carney

eBook Burying the Black Sox: How Baseball's Cover-Up of the 1919 World Series Fix Almost Succeeded ePub
Author: Gene Carney
Language: English
ISBN: 1597971081
ISBN13: 978-1597971089
Publisher: Potomac Books (June 1, 2007)
Pages: 388
Category: Baseball
Subcategory: Outdoors
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 978
Formats: docx mbr txt azw
ePub file: 1789 kb
Fb2 file: 1650 kb

The World Series of 1919. - Shoeless Joe Jackson's role. - Appendix: Triples in the 1919 World Series.

The World Series of 1919. - Shoeless, Knuckles, and Lefty. - The other ghosts of summer. obscured text on front cover due to sticker.

Gene Carney has not entirely solved the puzzle; nobody possibly could. But thanks to his detective work we have a lot more of the pieces and a fuller picture of what occurred both during the 1919 World Series and, equally significantly, during the cover-up that followed. -Jules Tygiel, author of Past Time: Baseball as History.

Burying the Black Sox is the first book to focus on the cover-up that kept the fix from .

Burying the Black Sox is the first book to focus on the cover-up that kept the fix from the American public until almost another whole baseball season was played, and to examine in detail the way events unfolded as the deception was unraveled. Carney explores how Charles Comiskey, the owner of the White Sox, and his fellow owners tried to bury the incident and control the damage, how the conspiracy failed, and how "Shoeless" Joe Jackson attempted to clear his name. In revisiting the 1919 World Series scandal, baseball historian Carney argues persuasively that the infamous fix consisted of two conspiracies: the unsuccessful attempt of players, managers and owners.

For Carney, there is the underlying cover up by Comiskey, Ban Johnson, journalists and others including Landis .

For Carney, there is the underlying cover up by Comiskey, Ban Johnson, journalists and others including Landis to cast blame on eight convenient targets to preserve the owners reputation and wallets from investigation and scrutiny. For Landis and the owners, moving on from the scandal was crucial for the existential future of the game.

Burying the Black Sox book. to learn more about the events leading up to and following the 1919 World Series in which eight members of the Chicago White Sox were accused of fixing games. Most fans today know that gamblers and ballplayers conspired. Mr. Carney's premise is that the White Sox players were scapegoats used to cover up the fact that major league baseball had (for some time) a significant connection to gambling that, if fully exposed, would have ended its reign as the National Pastime.

Burying the Black Sox is the first book to focus on the cover-up that kept the fix .

Burying the Black Sox: How Baseball's Cover-Up of the 1919 World Series Fix Almost Succeeded. Washington: Potomac Books, In. 2006. Specifically, several of the chapters are papers that were delivered at the 2005 Jerry Malloy Conference. The narrative begins with Black teams and players that made notable contributions before 1910. The second chapter provides a great deal of information about Andrew "Rube" Foster and the dominant Negro League team from Chicago-the Chicago American Giants.

book by Gene Carney

Burying the Black Sox. How Baseball&8217;s Cover-Up of. .

Burying the Black Sox. How Baseball&8217;s Cover-Up of the 1919 World Series Fix Almost Succeeded.

The Black Sox scandal was baseball’s original sin - its first instance of game fixing, which shocked the . Hardly a soul outside organized baseball knew of the purported attempts to fix the World Series in 1903, 1905, 1914, 1917 and 1918

The Black Sox scandal was baseball’s original sin - its first instance of game fixing, which shocked the conscience of the nation. Hardly a soul outside organized baseball knew of the purported attempts to fix the World Series in 1903, 1905, 1914, 1917 and 1918. The scandal was a cataclysmic event in the game’s history not because it was the first time anyone had cheated, but because it was the first time the public knew about it.

Most fans today know that gamblers and ballplayers conspired to “fix” the 1919 World Series—the Black Sox Scandal. It has been touched upon in classic works of sports history such as Eliot Asinof’s Eight Men Out, referred to in literary classics like W. P. Kinsella’s Shoeless Joe, and has been central to two of the best baseball movies ever made, John Sayles’s Eight Men Out and Phil Robinson’s Field of Dreams. Many, however, would be surprised to learn that it took nearly a year to uncover the fix. Burying the Black Sox is the first book to focus on the cover-up that kept the fix from the American public until almost another whole baseball season was played, and to examine in detail the way events unfolded as the deception was unraveled. Unlike Eliot Asinof in Eight Men Out, previously the definitive book on the subject, Carney thoroughly documents his information and brings together evidence from a wide variety of sources, many not available to Asinof or more recent writers. In Burying the Black Sox, Gene Carney reveals what else happened and answers the questions that fascinate any baseball fan wondering about baseball’s original dilemma over guilt and innocence. Who else in baseball knew that the fix was in? When did they know? And what did they do about it? Carney explores how Charles Comiskey, the owner of the White Sox, and his fellow owners tried to bury the incident and control the damage, how the conspiracy failed, and how “Shoeless” Joe Jackson attempted to clear his name. He uses primary research materials that weren’t available when Asinof wrote Eight Men Out, including the 1920 grand jury statements by Jackson and pitcher Eddie Cicotte, the diary of Comiskey’s secretary, and the transcripts of Jackson’s 1924 suit against the Sox for back pay. Where Asinof told the story of the eight “Black Sox,” Carney explains the baseball industry’s uncertain response to the scandal.
Jonariara
16965781
Harold Kasselman's review
Jan 30, 2018 · edit

liked it

I can credit the author for his exhaustive research for this treatise on the 1919 scandal. The execution, however, left this reader "dazed and confused". He does raise some fascinating questions for debate. There is so much information that the author wants to synthesize and convey to the reader that it's almost a stream of consciousness. One thing is clear from this book about the 1919 World Series: there is "no unanimity about what happened. And what we do not know for sure seems to outweigh what we do know." The other fact we come away with is that there is "no single sin myth" in baseball/gambling history. It happened before 1919 and happened at least in 1920 and even later in the decade. Then there is Pete Rose.
The author asks the reader and the moguls and establishment of baseball itself not to be satisfied with the easy and comfortable road of complacency with what has been conveyed in Eight men Out. For Carney, there is the underlying cover up by Comiskey, Ban Johnson, journalists and others including Landis to cast blame on eight convenient targets to preserve the owners reputation and wallets from investigation and scrutiny. For Landis and the owners, moving on from the scandal was crucial for the existential future of the game. If the public lost trust and faith in the cleanliness of the game, it would doom the owners and the officials. Why Carney asks, should Charles Comiskey, clearly one who had early knowledge of the fix, be enshrined while men like Buck Weaver, knowledge but non complicity, and Joe Jackson, begged Comiskey to bench him to disassociate him from the fix, be banned and blackballed forever? Carney makes a very good argument for why Weaver should be pardoned and reinstated. Yet from Ford Frick in 1953 to Vincent Faye, commissioners have decided to leave the past buried. The case for weaver is perhaps stronger than Jackson. Weaver knew of the fix, may have attended a couple of meetings, but renounced himself from any conspiracy. His crime, as per Landis, was guilty knowledge. He should have informed on his pals-been a snitch. Certainly he was acquitted in a criminal court, but Landis created a lower standard and in hindsight it has protected the integrity of the sport. The deterrent effect of punishing guilty knowledge has been effective, but what of justice? That is what Carney asks and he makes a very valid argument. As for Jackson, there is so much ambiguity that it's a harder sell. He sued in a 1924 civil case for his salaries cut short by his banishment. The jury decided 11-1 in his favor that he had done nothing wrong on the field to justify the cancellation of his contract by Comiskey.(The judge set aside the verdict). The jury saw the witnesses, judged their demeanor and declared Jackson clean. Carney enlightened me with the assertion(somewhat corroborated) that Jackson went to Comiskey's secretary(GM) and told him about the fix, tried to give him back the $5,000 that Lefty Williams gave him, and repeatedly tried to see Comiskey but was blocked. On the other hand Jackson's 1924 testimony differed from his grand jury testimony(so much so that the judge ordered him jailed for perjury for a day). And perhaps celebrity was a cause for the jury's sympathetic verdict for Jackson.
As for the gamblers involved, the instigator the financial backer, anyone's guess is as good as Carney's. He provides hearsay and rumor but there are no conclusions. Were the players forced to throw games for fear of their lives? Lefty Williams' wife continued to answer affirmatively until her last days. Which games if any were thrown? Which players demonstrably threw them? We have no definitive answers but Carney offers the research for the reader to make their own decisions. This is a good book to generate discussions and for a resource for years to come but it's a struggle to follow.
Gozragore
I loved this book about the Black Sox and about the 1919 world series and about all the players, the owners, and the gamblers, by reading this great book you as a reader get to understand what was taking place during the year 1919, this book gives the total truth about the 1919 World Series, it is worth reading.
Zorve
While admitting the entire story of the 1919 World Series will remain a mystery author Gene Carney has provided us with a detailed account of the tangled web from numerous sources that he has footnoted regarding this infamous Fall Classic. Bitterness between American League President Ban Johnson and White Sox owner Charles Comiskey, along with players, reporters, and gamblers involved in complex ways, and everyone interested in covering their own self interests lead one to question how much of this World Series was actually "thrown". Pale Hose owner Comiskey was interested in covering up the plot because he feared losing valuable players and wanted to protect his investment, namely his White Sox franchise. Throwing ball games was nothing new in the game's history, and maybe not even World Series' games. The year 1919 was the year that became most well known, and unless the game's magnates cleaned up the game, baseball would go the same way as boxing and horse racing. Commissioner Landis didn't take into consideration any degrees of guilt among the players. In fact, J. G. Taylor Spink, publisher of The Sporting News, told me in a letter in February of 1961 that "They (the players) were all guilty." He said this even though he said, "I knew Jackson very well. In fact he did me a couple of favors I will never forget." It is safe to say this story is a very complicated one, and for the game's sake it is good that a stop was put to the continuing problem of fixed baseball games. Had it been ignored the problem would undoubtedly have escalated. Players and owners have known for several years about the steroid problem in the game and ignored it. Now the mess becomes more complicated to untangle due to their inaction. In ignoring the problem the game sadly didn't learn from its past history. Whatever you think you know about the infamous World Series of 1919 this book will make you reevaluate your beliefs and bring up yet more questions for you. This is a difficult subject to objectively research, but this is one book you need to read if you are fascinated with baseball's history.
Kearanny
Great read. Gets into details about the fix that others books about it do not. It challenges Elliot Asinof's story about the fix which most of is not sourced, meanwhile Carney does a great job digging up sources to cite throughout.
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