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eBook Cooperstown Confidential: Heroes, Rogues, and the Inside Story of the Baseball Hall of Fame ePub

by Allen Barra,Zev Chafets

eBook Cooperstown Confidential: Heroes, Rogues, and the Inside Story of the Baseball Hall of Fame ePub
Author: Allen Barra,Zev Chafets
Language: English
ISBN: 1596915455
ISBN13: 978-1596915459
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA; 1st US Edition edition (July 1, 2009)
Pages: 256
Category: Biographies
Subcategory: Outdoors
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 565
Formats: doc rtf mobi lrf
ePub file: 1319 kb
Fb2 file: 1107 kb

In Cooperstown Confidential, Zev Chafets does not merely humanize the Hall and its inhabitants-he paints a. .Robert Lipsyte, author of Heroes of Baseball. The story of the Hall is baseball and politics, lust for fame and gain, ridiculous ballyhoo and deadly serious business.

In Cooperstown Confidential, Zev Chafets does not merely humanize the Hall and its inhabitants-he paints a fascinating, in-depth, occasionally outlandish portrait to be hung alongside the busts of the Babe and Hammerin' Hank. Chafets knocks this one over the Green Monster. Somehow, Zev Chafets got it all - and told it with toughness, humor, and grace. Richard Ben Cramer, author of Joe DiMaggio: The Hero's Life.

I love baseball history, so I was looking forward to a book which purportedly relates the "real" history of the National Baseball . He shows how the Hall of Fame came to be. Cooperstown was supposed to be the place where Abner Doubleday originated the game

I love baseball history, so I was looking forward to a book which purportedly relates the "real" history of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Zev Chafets does not disappoint. I see him as a superb writer, and seems to know just how to hold his audience. Cooperstown was supposed to be the place where Abner Doubleday originated the game. This proved to be a flight of the imagination of Al Spaulding one of the first great players in the National League and an owner of the Cubs.

If baseball is America's national religion, then the Hall of Fame is its High Church. This is the book the Hall of Fame deserves. Being named among its 286 inductees makes you the closest thing our country has to an undisputed hero - even a secular saint. But the men in the Hall of Fame are no angels. Among their number are gamblers, drunks, race-baiters, at least one murderer, and perhaps the greatest collection of bona fide characters ever to be dignified by an honor of any kind. This is the book the Hall of Fame deserves

The first book to draw back the veil on the Hall of Fame, combining an insiders history . For 100 years, the story of the Hall of Fame has been deeply tied up with the story of America.

The first book to draw back the veil on the Hall of Fame, combining an insiders history of the Hall and its players with a consideration of baseballs place in culture. The National Baseball Hall of Fame is the holiest institution in American sports. Its not just a place to honor great athletes. As Zev Chafets points out, its no coincidence that the first black Hall of Famer, Jackie Robinson, was inducted in 1962, at the height of the civil rights movement. Or that the Hall is now planning a wing to honor Latino players.

Heroes, Rogues, and the Inside Story of. the Baseball Hall of Fame. For information address Bloomsbury USA, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10010. Published by Bloomsbury USA, New York. Zev Chafets is the author of ten books, including A Match Made in Heaven, Members of the Tribe, and The Devil's Night. He lives in Westchester, New York, with his wife and children.

Cooperstown Confidential book

Cooperstown Confidential book. Start by marking Cooperstown Confidential: Heroes, Rogues, and the Inside Story of the Baseball Hall of Fame as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. As Zev Chafets points out, it’s no coincidence that the first black Hall of Famer, Jackie Robinson, was inducted in 1962, at the height of the civil rights movement. For a hundred years, the story of the Hall of Fame has been deeply tied up with the story of America.

book by Ze'ev Chafets Cooperstown Confidential : Heroes, Rogues, and the Inside Story of the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Cooperstown Confidential : Heroes, Rogues, and the Inside Story of the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Help the memories live on and celebrate the game you love! Be a Part of Preserving Baseball. Be a Part of Baseball History. Membership is the best way to experience Hall of Fame Weekend, celebrate the game you love and honor the all-time greats! Celebrate as a member. Hall of Fame Online Store. Official 2019 Induction Gear.

History Museum in Cooperstown, New York. The Hall of Fame remembers tes 1960 World Series hero Hal Smith, who passed away on Thursday. National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum). National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

The first book to draw back the veil on the Hall of Fame, combining an insider's history of the Hall and its players with a consideration of baseball's place in culture. The National Baseball H all of Fame is the holiest institution in American sports. It's not just a place to honor great athletes. It's where America's pastime announces to the world what it is and what it wants to be. It's not just a sports museum; it's a mirror of American culture. As Zev Chafets points out, it's no coincidence that the first black Hall of Famer, Jackie Robinson, was inducted in 1962, at the height of the civil rights movement. Or that the Hall is now planning a wing to honor Latino players. For a hundred years, the story of the Hall of Fame has been deeply tied up with the story of America.

For the first time, this book shows the inner workings of the Hall: the politics, the players, and the people who own and preserve it. From the history of the founding Clark family to a day on the town with the newly inducted Goose Gossage, from the battle over steroids to the economics of induction and secret campaigns by aspiring players, this is a highly irreverent and highly entertaining tour through the life of an American institution. For anyone who cares about baseball, this is essential reading.

Kelezel
The author seems displeased about virtually everything related to the Hall Of Fame. He doesn't like those who run it or many of those who vote for members. He spends a lot of pages lamenting that there are less African American players than there used to be. He argues that Latin American players are being exploited. He's favorable to Marvin Miller's legal work that greatly increased ballplayers financial situations. He doesn't think that the use of steroids or performance enhancing drugs are necessarily bad for baseball. After all if both pitchers and batters are enhanced they cancel each other out. And enhancements don't help the bat hit the ball. With regard to African American participation many of that race feel the game is too slow for them. They prefer the fast moving excitement of basketball and football. No conspiracy there. As for Latin exploitation why are so many here? Maybe they see better financial rewards and opportunity here than at home. Marvin Miller and salaries, my personal feeling is that athletes make way too much. If we're to come down on the windfalls made by some Wall Street types and others why should athletes today make astronomical amounts? Maybe we need wage controls in this country. On the positive side I liked his appendex that showed the years players were inducted. I had never seen that information. Also, I'm glad he called attention to the Hugo Chavez fiasco where the anti-American dictator offered to sponsor a permanent exhibition of Hispanic Baseball exhibit. It's beyond comprehension how the HOF went along with that. So, all in all, I don't think this is at all a definitive book on the HOF. Still, I enjoyed reading it.
Mr.Twister
I liked the historical aspect, it made me question who should be in the hall. Loved it, it was a great read.
Dianazius
I love baseball history, so I was looking forward to a book which purportedly relates the "real" history of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Zev Chafets does not disappoint. I see him as a superb writer, and seems to know just how to hold his audience. His writing casts the light upon many aspects of the Hall's selection process, and on the story of the Hall itself, which might surprise some fans of our National Pastime. A very enjoyable read.
Duzshura
Rule Five in the charter determining who gets elected to the baseball Hall of Fame states, "Voting shall be based upon the player's record, playing ability, integrity, sportsmanship, character, and contributions to the team(s) on which the player played." Zev Chafets, a former sports columnist for the NEW YORK DAILY NEWS, would like to see Rule Five eliminated, making room for such players as Peter Rose, Barry Bonds, and Shoeless Joe Jackson.

Chafets bases his argument on some of the characters already in the Hall who don't meet Rule Five standards. Ty Cobb and Tris Speaker conspired to fix a game and Judge Landis helped with the cover-up. Speaker was also a member of the Ku Klux Klan. Grover Cleveland Alexander pitched while drunk and there are several cocaine addicts in the Hall. Sports writer Red Smith recommended they blow the Hall up and start over again.

Perhaps the most entertaining part of the book is the first section, where Chafets is less belligerent. He shows how the Hall of Fame came to be. Cooperstown was supposed to be the place where Abner Doubleday originated the game. This proved to be a flight of the imagination of Al Spaulding one of the first great players in the National League and an owner of the Cubs. Cooperstown was also founded by James Fenimore Cooper's father and was home to the Clark family whose forefather was a lawyer for Isaac Singer, the inventor of the sewing machine. The Clarks still own most of Cooperstown and run the HOF.

While he's not ranting about steroids, Chafets talks to some of the members of the veterans of the women's baseball league who are sitting in the lobby signing autographs for five bucks a pop. When Chafets asks about their signatures and the HOF designation, they get all huffy, but women haven't been admitted as of yet. He also gives us a look at the memorabilia industry. Goose Gossage was just elected as Chafets was writing the book and his autograph was suddenly worth triple what it was and his speaking fees went way up as well.

To emphasize the Hall`s hypocrisy, Chafets shows us the fake ball that Doubleday used in that first game. Perhaps Chafets's strongest argument regarding steroids use is that other professions use performance enhancing drugs. Scientists use "smart" pills; surgeons and pilots use pills to improve their alertness. Even the great Hank Aaron has admitted to popping a "greenie" to help him break out of a slump.
Zehaffy
Chafets is an excellent writer. While for avid baseball fans, the information contained in the book is not new. Chafets' interpretation of the facts is insightful and strongly supported. He avoids the knee jerk reaction to the use of steroids and other performance enhancing drugs that all such players should be banned from the Hall and examines the use of amphetamines, pain killers and other drugs in the past which didn't bar the entry of current members of the Hall. The book is well worth reading and makes you realize that the heroes of the past often look better in retrospect because we forget that they, too, were human.
Onath
Excellent
Kazijora
A gift. He loved it!
I was looking forward to many stories about the HOF members and some "expose" pieces which tickle the funny bone without being disrespectful of the greats of the past. The book was about half that and half the author's opinion on the steroid era etc.I can form my own opinion on those issues I don't need his and am sorry I paid to read them.
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