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eBook Everest, free to decide: The story of the first South Africans ro reach the highest point on earth ePub

by Ian Woodhall,Cathy O'Dowd

eBook Everest, free to decide: The story of the first South Africans ro reach the highest point on earth ePub
Author: Ian Woodhall,Cathy O'Dowd
Language: English
ISBN: 1868721019
ISBN13: 978-1868721016
Publisher: Zebra Press; 1st Edition edition (1997)
Pages: 301
Category: Mountaineering
Subcategory: Outdoors
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 719
Formats: rtf mobi doc lrf
ePub file: 1289 kb
Fb2 file: 1101 kb

The South Africans were dogged by early problems, which started when the three most experienced climbers in the .

The South Africans were dogged by early problems, which started when the three most experienced climbers in the team quit before even reaching base camp due to personality clashes with Woodhall, who also banished a reporter and photographer from the main sponsor, who then withdrew their support. List this Seller's Books. Payment Methods accepted by seller.

Cathy O'Dowd (born 1968) is a South African rock climber, mountaineer, author and motivational speaker. She was the first woman to reach the summit of Mount Everest from both south (25 May 1996) and north sides (29 May 1999)

Cathy O'Dowd (born 1968) is a South African rock climber, mountaineer, author and motivational speaker. She was the first woman to reach the summit of Mount Everest from both south (25 May 1996) and north sides (29 May 1999). O’Dowd grew up in Johannesburg, South Africa, and attended St. Andrew's School for Girls. She has climbed since her university days.

Items related to Everest; Free To Decide.

Signed by the author. B&W and colour photographs. Neat clean pages with light finger marks to text page edges. Few dog eared corners. Small bumps to corners. Items related to Everest; Free To Decide. Home Cathy O'Dowd Everest; Free To Decide. The Story Of The First South Africans. Everest; Free To Decide. The Story Of The First South Africans To Reach The Highest Point On Earth.

Everest book She was the first South African (of either sex) to climb Everest and the first woman.

May 1996 was one of the most eventful months in Everest's history - for all. Cathy O'Dowd is a South African author and climber who now lives in Andorra, in the Pyrenees mountains. She was the first South African (of either sex) to climb Everest and the first woman in the world to climb Everest from both sides. She has been climbing for over 30 years. She is also passionate about ski mountaineering and rock climbing. She works as an inspirational speaker on the internation Cathy O'Dowd is a South African author and climber who now lives in Andorra, in the Pyrenees mountains.

Author: O'Dowd, Cathy & Woodall, Ian. Everest Free to Decide. Told in diary form, this book tells the story of the first South African team ever to attempt the summit of Everest. Struik Publishers (Pty) LTD. ISBN-10. Internally clean and tightly bound. Condition: Used: Excellent. Read full description.

This book provides an interesting alternative view of the events of that disastrous 1996 climbing season, and . The story is told from the point of view of both Cathy O'Dowd and Ian Woodall, using interspersed paragraphs.

This book provides an interesting alternative view of the events of that disastrous 1996 climbing season, and that was why I purchased it. It works pretty well and gives extra insights. I particularly enjoyed O'Dowd's descriptive writing, which gave me a better view of the route and what it looks like to someone who is actually on the mountain. As with all climbing stories, many questions are left unanswered

The highest point above Earth’s center is the peak of Ecuador’s Mount Chimborazo, located just one degree south of the Equator where . You may be surprised to learn that Everest is not the tallest mountain on Earth, either.

The highest point above Earth’s center is the peak of Ecuador’s Mount Chimborazo, located just one degree south of the Equator where Earth’s bulge is greatest. Mount Everest, located in Nepal and Tibet, is usually said to be the highest mountain on Earth. That honor belongs to Mauna Kea, a volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii. Mauna Kea originates deep beneath the Pacific Ocean, and rises more than 33,500 feet from base to peak.

South Africans have been glued to radios for three days listening to a distant drama of national triumph crumble into an. .

South Africans have been glued to radios for three days listening to a distant drama of national triumph crumble into an inexplicable tragedy. At dawn on Saturday, they heard that the South African flag had been planted atop Mount Everest for the first time - a successful end to a much-publicized trek. And as Mr. Woodall and Miss O'Dowd continued their descent in Everest's lower altitudes today, one of the questions that remained unanswered was whether the two coming down had met Mr. Herrod going up and what was said. Continue reading the main story.

May 1996 was one of the most eventful months in Everest's history - for all the wrong reasons. Forteen expeditions were trying to climb the mountain from the southern side, among them the first South African team ever to attempt the summit. Sponsored initially by the "Johannesburg Sunday Times" and with the personal blessing of Nelson Mandela, the expedition was led by Ian Woodhall, and ex-British Army officer who had relatively limited high-altitude experience. The South Africans were dogged by early problems, which started when the three most experienced climbers in the team quit before even reaching base camp due to personality clashes with Woodhall, who also banished a reporter and photographer from the main sponsor, who then withdrew their support. At the South Col (26,000 feet) they sat out the huge storm of May 10-11 that led to the death of 11 climbers, but finally achieved their goal on Saturday 25 May when Ian Woodhill and Cathy O'Dowd reached the summit of Everest. Bruce Herrod, the deputy leader and a renowned photographer, reached the top later that day, unfortunately he did return - his body was found not far below the summit a year later.
Cordantrius
I was excited to get this book but my excitement quickly dwindled once I began reading. I don't know how to describe the writing style. I twice checked the information to see if I'd mistakenly purchased juvenile nonfiction. It's that bad and corny. It reads like something from the fifties or sixties, Lawrence Welk style. Everyone is goody-goody, "rah rah we're a team!" and just so unbelievably amazing and wonderful and simply a fun loving team of crazy kids. I finally ended up skipping whole sections just to arrive at the summit and Bruce's death. At least Cathy was honest enough to admit to some annoyance with the other team members.

On a personal note, I found the anti-American prejudice to be annoying and childish. By the way, it was one of those horrible Americans who cut Bruce's body down after several teams had just climbed right on past him in their bid for the summit.

It is an interesting perspective of the 1996 disaster and explains a lot of the misunderstandings regarding the South African team. Unfortunately the characters are presented so unrealistically goody-goody that it makes me suspicious of the whole story.
Malakelv
This was a difficult book to read. Both author have proven to lie as easily as they talk. This book provides a detailed view into their fantasies but it has little to do with truth. I regret having supported them at all by buying the book in the first place. If you are considerations purchasing this book, save your money. There are many, many other books about this tragic time on Everest. Most if not all of them will provide a much truer picture of the events. One can only hope that these two will find themselves in need of help someday and they will receive the same response they have given other in the past.
Goodman
This book provides an interesting alternative view of the events of that disastrous 1996 climbing season, and that was why I purchased it. The story is told from the point of view of both Cathy O'Dowd and Ian Woodall, using interspersed paragraphs. It works pretty well and gives extra insights. I particularly enjoyed O'Dowd's descriptive writing, which gave me a better view of the route and what it looks like to someone who is actually on the mountain.

As with all climbing stories, many questions are left unanswered. An attempt is made to explain why no one tried to turn Bruce Herrod around, but as is often the case in climbing disasters, the answers aren't entirely satisfactory. You can decide for yourself whether the book's premise has merit. Things are different when one is actually high on a mountain in bad weather, and O'Down and Woodall are lucky they made it down. They stayed with the idea of helping others still on the mountain, but because of the terrible communications during that disaster, they were actually in as much danger as anyone still left up there. They overestimated their own reserves.

In the end, they had to come to terms with their losses, and this is how they did it. If you are someone who follows mountaineering disaster and survival, this book is worthy of a place on your shelf.
Nakora
O'Dowd and Woodall are the worst kind of rogues; they are both chronic lairs and will sue anyone and everyone to gain whatever they desire, fame, fortune, etc. They are vile evil people. O'Dowd made a point of refusing a rival climber food drink or any assistance whatsoever, incl. Life or Death situations. Woodall threatened a rival climber with instant quietus by breaking his neck. On youtube you can fid a video of O'Dowd almost having sexual pleasure from describing people she saw dying or dead; her tongue, like that of a lizard, flicks in and out in a disturbing sickening way accompanying her orgiastic stories of death and destruction and her schadenfreude drips from every word. She lovingly describes the fate of a woman she refused any assistance to; her pleasure at the woman's death is beyond evil. Vile evil people, both of them.
Wire
I read this book back in 2005 after reading Into Thin Air and Everest by Ed Viesturs and David Breshears. To my surprise I found Woodall's book. He is a self-aggrandizing liar about his past and Ms. O'Dowd was, as other reviewers already said, not nice. I was shocked that they had the nerve to write this book. I won't reiterate what the others have reviewed so well, but I agree with No. 1, don't buy it. They sugarcoat their expeditionary tion and omit their disgraceful antics that not only cost Bruce Herrod his life but Woodall treated Africans Edmund February and Deshun Deysel abominably. He yelled and cursed others and adamantly refused to help others. He and his girlfriend had one goal: fame for themselves. Read Krakauer et al and get the truth.
Acrobat
give me a break cathy. whatever makes you sleep at night.
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