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eBook Good Company: Business Success in the Worthiness Era ePub

by Laurie Bassi

eBook Good Company: Business Success in the Worthiness Era ePub
Author: Laurie Bassi
Language: English
ISBN: 160994061X
ISBN13: 978-1609940614
Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers; 1 edition (September 5, 2011)
Pages: 296
Category: Business Culture
Subcategory: Perfomance
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 899
Formats: txt lit mbr docx
ePub file: 1808 kb
Fb2 file: 1690 kb

Now Playing Good Company: Business Success in the Worthiness. Good Company is a book whose time has come.

Now Playing Good Company: Business Success in the Worthiness. Laurie Bassi and her co-authors do a masterful job of defining good companies supporting their thesis that good companies are also high performing companies and supporting their conclusions with some serious analytical horsepower. Their thesis is disarmingly simple.

Companies shirk taxes while padding profits. Firms foul the planet but. Laurie Bassi and her coauthors show that despite the dispiriting headlines, we are entering what they coin the "Worthiness Er. And in it, the good guys are poised to win. Across the globe, people are choosing the companies in their lives in the same way they choose Good Company: Business Success in the Worthiness Era by Laurie Bassi, Ed Frauenheim, Dan McMurrer & Larry Costello was chosen by Soundview Executive Book Summaries as one of the Top 30 Business Books of 2012.

Their Good Company Index ranking of the Fortune 100 takes the belief in the bottom-line benefits of good .

Their Good Company Index ranking of the Fortune 100 takes the belief in the bottom-line benefits of good behavior out of the realm of faith and into the realm of facts. In recent decades, corporate Public Relations departments and business books like "Good to Great" promised a new era of value-based leadership, but as recent events have shown, actual corporate behavior still follows the old 'whatever you can get away with' standard. But the author and her co-authors have news: the 'bad boy' days are over.

Good Company explains how this new era results from a convergence of forces, ranging from the explosion of online . Скачать с помощью Mediaget. com/Good Company: Business Success in the Worthiness Era. Tagged: Good.

Good Company explains how this new era results from a convergence of forces, ranging from the explosion of online information-sharing to the emergence of the ethical consumer and the arrival of civic-minded Millennials. Across the globe, people are choosing the companies in their lives in the same way they choose the guests they invite into their homes. They are demanding that companies be “good company. Proof is in the numbers.

Reprinted with permission of Berrett-Koehler Publishers, San Francisco, CA. ww. kconnection. Ed Frauenheim is a journalist with 15 years of experience writing about topics including technology, work, business, and education.

Business Success in the Worthiness Era. Laurie Bassi.

The authors of the book Good Company: Business Success in the Worthiness Era graded 300 of America’s largest companies on their worthiness -how well . BASSI: Worthiness means doing the right thing

The authors of the book Good Company: Business Success in the Worthiness Era graded 300 of America’s largest companies on their worthiness -how well they rate at being a Good Employer, a Good Seller, and a Good Steward. In other words, it pays to be good. BASSI: Worthiness means doing the right thing. The hypothesis here is that a convergence of sources-economic, social, and political-is creating what we call the Naked Corporation.

book by Ed Frauenheim. More evidence that bad guys finish first in business? No. A different story is unfolding. Companies shirk taxes while padding profits. Firms foul the planet but keep raking in revenue. Reckless greed on Wall Street goes largely unpunished.

Good Company I'm Laurie, Bassi, economist & co-author of "Good Company," the .

Good Company I'm Laurie, Bassi, economist & co-author of "Good Company," the winner of the 2012 Nautilus Gold Award for the best business/leadership book of the year. to any business leaders, activists, policy makers and anyone else who values the importance of ethical and worthy business practices.

Companies shirk taxes while padding profits. Firms foul the planet but keep raking in revenue. Reckless greed on Wall Street goes largely unpunished. More evidence that bad guys finish first in business? No. A different story is unfolding. Laurie Bassi and her coauthors show that despite the dispiriting headlines, we are entering a more hopeful economic age. The authors call it the “Worthiness Era.” And in it, the good guys are poised to win. Good Company explains how this new era results from a convergence of forces, ranging from the explosion of online information sharing to the emergence of the ethical consumer and the arrival of civic-minded Millennials. Across the globe, people are choosing the companies in their lives in the same way they choose the guests they invite into their homes. They are demanding that companies be “good company.” Proof is in the numbers. The authors created the Good Company Index to take a systematic look at Fortune 100 companies’ records as employers, sellers, and stewards of society and the planet. The results were clear: worthiness pays off. Companies in the same industry with higher scores on the index—that is, companies that have behaved better—outperformed their peers in the stock market. And this is not some academic exercise: the authors have used principles of the index at their own investment firm to deliver market-beating results. Using a host of real-world examples, Bassi and company explain each aspect of corporate worthiness and describe how you can assess other companies with which you do business as a consumer, investor, or employee. This detailed guide will help you determine who the good guys are—those companies that are worthy of your time, your loyalty, and your money.
Oveley
Good Company is a book whose time has come. Laurie Bassi and her co-authors do a masterful job of defining good companies supporting their thesis that good companies are also high performing companies and supporting their conclusions with some serious analytical horsepower.
Their thesis is disarmingly simple. Because of changes in technology, economics, politics, and society we have entered the "worthiness era", a time in which employees, customers, and communities are demanding that the companies with which they do business measure up to higher standards. Consumer desires for an experience in addition to a purchase drive companies to treat their consumers better. The global economic meltdown has forced employees to rank job security more highly on their list of important employment factors, and make job decisions accordingly. And of course technology has enabled us to share thoughts, experiences, and frustrations instantly. Going viral has nothing to do with catching a cold these days.
The kicker is this: companies that do measure up in terms of worthiness perform better on financial criteria than others. This is the important finding in their book. Being a good company pays off financially. Goodness does not detract from the bottom line. It adds to it.
Bassi and her associates identify three factors that make a company good (or not): (1) how well the company treats employees, (2) how well the company treats customers and (3) how well the company treats the environment and the communities in which it operates. They measure the Fortune 100 companies on each of these three factors and develop grades, from A to F, for each company on each factor. I guess Laurie's history as a college professor is still with her!
This book adds value in at least three ways. First, and most importantly, the authors demonstrate that companies with better goodness grades outperform those with worse grades in the stock market. In other words, two companies in the same industry, say Exxon Mobil and Chevron, will have predictable differences in their stock prices, based on their goodness grades. The higher the grades, the better the stock market performance. This is groundbreaking. It reinforces the conclusion that doing good and doing well go hand in hand.
Second, their work takes into account large-scale social trends which, collectively, have ushered in a different environment for business. The Occupy Wall Street movement is a manifestation of their thesis that companies can no longer treat their customers, communities, and employees without respect and expect to get away with it. From globalization to the rising political power of historically disenfranchised people around the world (e.g. the Arab Spring movements) to social networking, mega-trends are changing the way we communicate, participate, and purchase. Companies that ignore these trends do so at their peril.
Finally, Bassi and her colleagues take great care to identify interesting and in most cases publicly available data with which to measure the goodness of companies on each of the three factors. Their book is not based on expert opinion or on telephone surveys. It is based on data from hundreds of thousands of people who have registered their views with organizations such as glassdoor.com and wRatings in addition to more traditional measures such as the Fortune 100 Best Places to Work. They use sophisticated analytical techniques to grade each company on each criterion so that we may have some confidence that their ratings are not going to change overnight.
Of course the book is also full of practical examples of companies, good and not-so-good, for those of us who look for examples and justifications. Their work is meticulously documented yet highly readable. The book will be valuable to anybody who cares about worthy treatment of customers, employees, and communities.
Joony
Good Company issues a challenge for executive management in both the private and public sectors. The combination of economic, social and political forces are leading us into new territory which the authors have dubbed the Worthiness Era. Good Company is a well researched book and provides an excellent vehicle for corporate debate about future directions and what should be the most effective criteria for measuring and evaluating enterprise results in the tomorrow's competitive global world of trade and business. Easy to read with some interesting insights into some of our leading organisations. A breath of fresh (clean) air. Well worth a read.
Munimand
I was expecting this book to be useful from a business perspective, but was surprised by what an enjoyable read it was. It's filled with anecdotes about companies doing things right or massively screwing things up. A fascinating and fun read.
Aiata
They made the subject interesting by describing what it takes to become "worthy" and why that's important - better profits, better morale, better environment! Even during the current "Great Recession"! A surprising answer! And their research was very extensive as to be fair. Book is a worthwhile read.
THOMAS
Loved this book! Very timely, great message, great writing style! A must read for students going out into the real world and for those of us already in the real world.
Cordann
"Good Company ties together the lessons we're still learning from The Great Recession, and explains what's fueling the occupy movements, shows how social responsibility and environmentalism is dramatically shifting business approaches, and identifies the rising power of customers. Good Company is an inspiring and uplifting read for those of us working to bring about a values-based leadership revolution. It's fairly bubbling over with hope, optimism, and deep insights into the change tsunami washing around the globe.

Critics of this book will likely try to dismiss it as left wing propaganda describing an unrealistic utopia. I can hear these old world managers (the anti-leaders) now: "that's not the reality of how the business world works. Good guys finish last."

Unfortunately, for old school managers -- and thankfully for the rest of us -- Good Company builds many of its arguments around solid research. These are deep and profound global trends that can't easily be blown off with ideological platitudes:

=> "Nearly six in ten global consumers polled in 2009 said a company or brand earned their business during the recession because it has been doing its part to support good causes...

=> Nearly three out of four Americans surveyed in 2010 said they are more likely to give their business to a company that has fair prices and supports a good cause than to a company that provides deep discounts but does not contribute to good causes...

=> 37 percent of Americans would punish a company that doesn't actively support a good cause by sharing negative opinions and experiences, while 47 percent would not invest in such a company...

=> 84 percent of consumers in China, India, Malaysia, and Singapore say they would accept a higher price for a green product ...
Globally, 56 percent of people want a job that allows them to give back to society versus 44 percent who value personal achievement more..."

Two of the authors, Laurie Bassi and Dan McMurrer, are organization effectiveness researchers, consultants, and run an investment fund based on the principles outlined in Good Company. They used their Good Company Index to rank the Fortune 100 (largest 100 companies on the Fortune 500 list of America's largest corporations). It's based on calculating scores for Good Employer (from Glassdoor.com), Good Seller (wRatings using customer evaluations of quality, fair price, and trust), and Good Steward (environment, penalties/fines, CEO compensation, use of tax havens, and society/community contributions).

The two companies in the "highest" category were United Parcel Service and Walt Disney. About 25 companies were rated "high." Some of these included IBM, FedEx, Dell, Procter and Gamble, Best Buy, and 3M. Three companies in the "lowest" category were Philip Morris, Prudential Financial, and Sunoco. Some of the 20 companies in the "low" category included Berkshire Hathaway, Exxon Mobil, News Corp, Dow Chemical, and General Dynamics.

"When we compared pairs of Fortune 100 companies within the same industry, we found that those with higher scores on the Good Company Index outperformed their peers in the stock market over periods of one, three, and five years."

Ultimately, Good Company shows how a strong leadership culture that's serving all of its stakeholders and society pays off for everyone buying from, working for, investing in, and doing business with the company. Traditional management that's narrowly focused on serving shareholders (and usually senior executives) fails to provide sustained profitability compared to their better led peers. And everyone else is worse off.

At times the authors go over the top with unsubstantiated theories and wild conjectures about where the world is headed. Nobody can predict the future and extrapolating today's trends forward inevitably proves to be way off the mark. But they build a very strong case that good guys finish first.

Good Company is a good read with more good evidence that multi-dimensional values-based leadership takes us all to good places."
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