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eBook Ambient Commons: Attention in the Age of Embodied Information ePub

by Malcolm McCullough

eBook Ambient Commons: Attention in the Age of Embodied Information ePub
Author: Malcolm McCullough
Language: English
ISBN: 0262313472
ISBN13: 978-0262313476
Publisher: The MIT Press (March 22, 2013)
Category: Architecture
Subcategory: Photo
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 478
Formats: lrf lit rtf lrf
ePub file: 1168 kb
Fb2 file: 1949 kb

Malcolm McCullough's book is to information what Central Park is to Manhattan―a place .

Malcolm McCullough's book is to information what Central Park is to Manhattan―a place of reflection and circumspection that reveals helpfully the contours of the world we have constructed and hopefully an outline of the world we should build, the ambient commons. Albert Borgmann, author of Real American Ethics and Holding On to Reality (Endorsement). That truism from Herbert Simon, a pioneer of cognitive science, has many implications for us as humans in the information age. Advertisers also vie for our attention-and the competition is fierce. Those who want your attention are progressively filling up every nook and cranny with information.

In Ambient Commons, Malcolm McCullough explores the workings of attention through a rediscovery of. .Ambient Commons is quiet, patient and profound; through 12 pithy chapters, it asks us to ponder information contexts. Times Higher Education.

In Ambient Commons, Malcolm McCullough explores the workings of attention through a rediscovery of surroundings. McCullough describes what he calls the Ambient: an increasing tendency to perceive information superabundance whole, where individual signals matter less and at least some mediation assumes inhabitable form. He explores how the fixed forms of architecture and the city play a cognitive role in the flow of ambient information.

Ambient Commons book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Ambient Commons: Attention in the Age of Embodied Information as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In "Ambient Commons," Malcolm McCullough explores the workings of attention through a rediscovery of surroundings. He explores how the fixed forms of architecture and the city play a cognitive role in the flow of ambient information

Malcolm McCullough takes a less adversarial approach. This book’s great strength is its focus on attention.

Malcolm McCullough takes a less adversarial approach. A scholar of architecture, he writes books and articles that offer gentle reflections on the startling collisions between analogue and digital places, structures and agendas. Ambient Commons: Attention in the Age of Embodied Information, is quiet, patient and profound; through 12 pithy chapters, it asks us to ponder information contexts. McCullough values and validates the importance of managing data glut and platform proliferation, arguing that attention has become something to guard and to manage. He explores how the fixed forms of architecture and the city play a cognitive role in the flow of ambient information

In Ambient Commons, Malcolm McCullough explores the workings of attention though a rediscovery of surroundings. Not all that informs has been written and sent; not all attention involves deliberate thought.

In Ambient Commons, Malcolm McCullough explores the workings of attention though a rediscovery of surroundings. The intrinsic structure of space - the layout of a studio, for example, or a plaza - becomes part of any mental engagement with it. McCullough describes what he calls the Ambient: an increasing tendency to perceive information superabundance whole, where individual signals matter less and at least some mediation assumes inhabitable form

In Ambient Commons, Malcolm McCullough explores the workings of attention though a rediscovery of surroundings. McCullough describes what he calls the Ambient: an increasing tendency to perceive information superabundance whole, where individual signals matter less and at least some mediation assumes inhabitable form

By Malcolm McCullough. On rediscovering surroundings when information goes everywhere. The world is filling with ever more kinds of media, in ever more contexts and formats.

By Malcolm McCullough. Download PDF (VIP members). Thanks for Sharing! Description. Additional information. Glowing rectangles have become part of the scene; screens, large and small, appear everywhere.

Request PDF On Jul 11, 2014, Ella-Mae Hubbard and others published Ambient commons: attention in the age of.Although these disciplines partially converge in the field of computer- supported cooperative work, their different perspectives on roles remain largely unconnected.

Although these disciplines partially converge in the field of computer- supported cooperative work, their different perspectives on roles remain largely unconnected roles in computer systems supporting cooperation.

The world is filling with ever more kinds of media, in ever more contexts and formats. Glowing rectangles have become part of the scene; screens, large and small, appear everywhere. Physical locations are increasingly tagged and digitally augmented. Amid this flood, your attention practices matter more than ever. You might not be able to tune this world out. So it is worth remembering that underneath all these augmentations and data flows, fixed forms persist, and that to notice them can improve other sensibilities. In Ambient Commons, Malcolm McCullough explores the workings of attention through a rediscovery of surroundings. McCullough describes what he calls the Ambient: an increasing tendency to perceive information superabundance whole, where individual signals matter less and at least some mediation assumes inhabitable form. He explores how the fixed forms of architecture and the city play a cognitive role in the flow of ambient information. As a persistently inhabited world, can the Ambient be understood as a shared cultural resource, to be socially curated, voluntarily limited, and self-governed as if a commons? Ambient Commons invites you to look past current obsessions with smart phones to rethink attention itself, to care for more situated, often inescapable forms of information.

Keramar
This fantastic read shows how everything informative is 'hitched together' throughout time and space with memorable image and meaningful insights.
Ghordana
Wonderfully written book on a topic that is important right now to understand what is happening to us a culture. Neither cheerleader nor cynic, he has interesting insights about this world of social media, et al.
Very readable
Amarin
A short sighted understanding of the role technology plays in our lives. The author seems out-of-touch and curmudgeonly as he attempts to embody how "kids these days" don't look at the stars like they used to. However, the framework of ambient commons seems helpful if you can get beyond the author's own self-righteousness.
Irostamore
I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to waste their time trying to make sense of a bunch of words saying nothing. The author clearly has thought about this issue from perspectives of psychology, architecture, philosophy, and others I can't even describe, but unless you are well-read in these (and other) topics most of it is complete gibberish, with almost no relation to any real situations, technologies, or people that would make the book remotely graspable (by the way, there's a great long section where the author defines "situation" until your eyes bleed). Useless for practitioners, incomprehensible to the lay-person, and probably really interesting to academics who have nothing better to do with their lives.

If you already have a copy, instead of reading it go outside and think about the ways technology changes us while lighting the book on fire and watching the flames.
Tansino
As information becomes plentiful, attention becomes scarce. That truism from Herbert Simon, a pioneer of cognitive science, has many implications for us as humans in “the information age.” Advertisers also vie for our attention—and the competition is fierce. Those who want your attention are progressively filling up every nook and cranny with information. Ads, links, and notices are placed in any spec of unclaimed real estate. Remember when you first heard someone speaking to you from a little gadget attached to the gas pump? Or first saw a video explaining the advantages of a product hung on the end aisle at the supermarket? The same is true of virtual real estate, as when ads are crowded onto websites. As computing goes mobile, our outdoor attention is not only grabbed by billboards and other signage everywhere, but our mobile devices simultaneously demand our attention be directed toward tiny screens and whatever is going on in the online world.

At this point we must ask how our situational awareness (SA) is faring. Do we know what is going on around our body in the physical world? Do we notice our surroundings? Obviously, SA is essential if we are to avoid accidents such as walking in front of a vehicle or falling into a ditch. How many times have you seen a pedestrian walking, even in a busy parking lot, with eyes glued to his or her mobile phone? How many bags or cases have been snatched while the carrier’s mind was distracted with a phone call or text? Yes, SA is important for our safety, but something else is at risk as well. It is our ability to be fascinated with aspects of our surroundings.

Professor McCullough observes that, for the most part, we enjoy the superabundance of information in modern life. But perhaps we can use technological advances to better filter it. There is evidence that giving conscious attention to our situational awareness can help us. Attention is not limited to a spotlighted area, nor does it need to be effortful. Recent concepts such as “nature-deficit disorder” and ecopsychology reflect growing awareness that human mental health, indeed, human sanity, depends upon attending to our environment. Professor McCullough would argue that the built, as well as natural, environment can provide valuable structure and be restorative to our frazzled selves.

Those steeped in the academic discourse of architecture and design will find it more easily understood than the rest of us (hence the missing fifth star), but if you are looking for an intriguing challenge, you will be rewarded for your effort. When I needed a quicker intro to the whole topic, Professor McCullough recommended starting with the journal article “On Attention to Surroundings” in the November/December, 2012, issue of Interactions (published by ACM, Association for Computing Machinery), pp. 41-49. The concepts are more fully explored in Ambient Commons. The references at the end of the article and the endnotes of the book are wonderful. Prof. McCullough shows great courtesy in crediting original sources to the degree possible, even when ideas have become "common knowledge." It is also a beautifully designed book; even if I couldn’t read English, I would love this book for its visual and tactile delight, inside and out.

Disclosure: Much of this review also appears in connection with Professor McCullough's interview on The Social Network Show in August 2014: http://thesocialnetworkstation.com/the-battle-for-your-attention/ The website for the book is http://ambientcommons.org
Raniconne
Enlightening. As a graduate in ICT and looking to enter interaction design, McCullough's work opened my eyes to questions that anyone who is studying place-centric design & place specific computing should consider.
Phallozs Dwarfs
A piece of s***..
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