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eBook Capitalscapes: Folding Screens and Political Imagination in Late Medieval Kyoto ePub

by Matthew Philip McKelway

eBook Capitalscapes: Folding Screens and Political Imagination in Late Medieval Kyoto ePub
Author: Matthew Philip McKelway
Language: English
ISBN: 082482900X
ISBN13: 978-0824829001
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press (February 28, 2006)
Pages: 296
Category: History & Criticism
Subcategory: Photo
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 267
Formats: lit mbr rtf lrf
ePub file: 1663 kb
Fb2 file: 1349 kb

Most date from the 16th and 17th centuries

Most date from the 16th and 17th centuries. McKelway outlines the characteristics of the genre before moving on to examine particular pairs of screens, specifically their history and content.

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Following the destruction of Kyoto during the civil wars of the late fifteenth century, large-scale panoramic paintings of the city began to emerge.

by Matthew Philip McKelway. Following the destruction of Kyoto during the civil wars of the late fifteenth century, large-scale panoramic paintings of the city began to emerge.

Amherst College 220 South Pleasant Street Amherst, MA 01002.

Traditions Unbound: Groundbreaking Painters from Eighteenth-Century Kyoto (San Francisco Asian Art Museum, 2005).

Might resist the modern (or even have been part of a kind of modernity) is therefore never clear. What remains is a set of subtle readings of Zenchiku's no plays.

McKelway states, "These Kyoto screens are astonishing for the grandeur of their vistas and complex detail and . Citation: Alisa Freedman.

Citation: Alisa Freedman.

Matthew Philip McKelway. Download PDF book format

Matthew Philip McKelway. Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. A most marvelous thing A formal and conceptual guide to Rakuchu? rakugai zu The Sanjo? screens The Uesugi screens Populating the screens The Azuchi screens and images of castles Return to Kyoto: Rakuchu? rakugai zu after the Tokugawa unification.

Following the destruction of Kyoto during the civil wars of the late fifteenth century, large-scale panoramic paintings of the city began to emerge. These enormous and intricately detailed depictions of the ancient imperial capital were unprecedented in the history of Japanese painting and remain unmatched as representations of urban life in any artistic tradition. Capitalscapes, the first book-length study of the Kyoto screens, examines their inception in the sixteenth to early seventeenth centuries, focusing on the political motivations that sparked their creation.

Close readings of the Kyoto screens reveal that they were initially commissioned by or for members of the Ashikaga shogunate and that urban panoramas reflecting the interests of both prevailing and moribund political elites were created to underscore the legitimacy of the newly ascendant Tokugawa regime. Matthew McKelway’s analysis of the screens exposes their creators’ masterful exploitation of ostensibly accurate depictions to convey politically biased images of Japan’s capital. His overarching methodology combines a historical approach, which considers the paintings in light of contemporary reports (diaries, chronicles, ritual accounts), with a thematic one, isolating individual motifs, deciphering their visual language, and comparing them with depictions in other works.

McKelway’s combined approach allows him to argue that the Kyoto screens were conceived and perpetuated as a painting genre that conveyed specific political meanings to viewers even as it provided textured details of city life. Students and scholars of Japanese art will find this lavishly illustrated work especially valuable for its insights into the cityscape painting genre, while those interested in urban and political history will appreciate its bold exploration of Kyoto’s past and the city’s late-medieval martial elite.

Shou
This is an excellent volume - for me from two points of view. First, the intesively researched text provides rich explanations of the relations between socio-cultural and political contexts and art that informed the development of Yamato-e in general, and this kind of screen painting in particular. Second, because the illustrations reveal the crystalisation of some of the most enduring pictorial conventions in Japanese painting.
Umi
This was quite an informative book on the various cities of Japan especially Kyoto and Edo and the way contemporaries looked at them. It also helps located main attractions and landmarks as they appeared centuries ago. A magnificent testimony to the artists of the time.
Ferri - My name
Capitalscapes is an examination of the Japanese screen painting genre known as rakuchû rakugai zu. That's scenes of Kyoto to you and me, those large and fabulously detailed pictures with hundreds of buildings and thousands of people, all overlain by golden clouds. Most date from the 16th and 17th centuries.

McKelway outlines the characteristics of the genre before moving on to examine particular pairs of screens, specifically their history and content. His discussions of the artists' choices about what to include and what to exclude, and how to depict what was chosen for inclusion, draw on similar depictions from other genres and Japanese history to form conclusions on the purpose of each pair of screens. Essentially, he sees each the screens as art with a political message tied to specific individuals and purposes, rather than simply a gorgeous rendition of Kyoto at a single point in time, and he explores the development and gradual fading of the genre.

I'm no specialist in Japanese art, but I found this book very accessible and easy to read. McKelway does the reader the favour of stating what he is going to examine next and then going ahead and doing exactly that. It might be too dry and academic a style for some, but it suited me fine. The text is broken up into relatively short sections within each chapter, making it easier to absorb the unfamiliar. There are references to the work of other researchers and plenty of footnotes for specialists or those who want to follow up particular points. The material is really interesting and I finished the book feeling like I'd learned a lot.

Obviously, this type of study requires pictures, and there are plenty of pictures provided: two sections of colour plates and scores of black-and-white pictures within the text. The black-and-white pictures aren't always as sharp as I would have preferred them to be, and the size of the book means that the fine detail can't always be appreciated. On the other hand, a larger format and more colour plates would equate to higher costs. All the flipping back and forth to match the right picture to the right point in the text did become a little tedious, but it's unavoidable with this sort of book and I'm not sure the layout could have been improved.

I did find some of McKelway 's conclusions a little unsatisfying, which I guess really means that I found the subject interesting enough to want to know more. Yet the fine points of detail are for the specialists to thrash out and resolve - or agree to disagree on - and should in no way impair the lay reader's enjoyment of Capitalscapes.
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