lind-peinture
» » The Horse Rider in African Art

eBook The Horse Rider in African Art ePub

by George Chemeche

eBook The Horse Rider in African Art ePub
Author: George Chemeche
Language: English
ISBN: 1851496343
ISBN13: 978-1851496341
Publisher: Antique Collectors Club Dist (July 16, 2011)
Pages: 384
Category: History & Criticism
Subcategory: Photo
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 850
Formats: lit mbr doc mobi
ePub file: 1539 kb
Fb2 file: 1913 kb

Horses are very rare in Africa.

Horses are very rare in Africa. The few to be found west of Sudan, from the lands of the Sahara and Sahel down to the fringes of the tropical forests, belong to the king, the chief warrior and to notable persons. Due to the dense humidity of the tropical rainforest and the deadly tsetse fly, only restricted numbers of horses survive. This visually stunning book presents a wealth of African art depicting the horse and its rider in a variety of guises, from Epa masks and Yoruba divination cups to Dogon sculptures and Senufo carvings. In Mali, the Bamana, Boso and Somono ethnic groups still celebrate the festivals of the puppet masquerade.

Antique Collectors Club Dist.

The Horse Rider in African Art Format: Hardcover Authors: George Chemeche ISBN10: 1851496343 Published: 2011-07-16 The Horse Rider in African Art. Specifications. Antique Collectors Club Dist.

George Chemeche (Chemeche, George). used books, rare books and new books. The Horse Rider in African Art: ISBN 9781851496341 (978-1-85149-634-1) Hardcover, Antique Collectors Club Dist, 2011. Find all books by 'George Chemeche' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'George Chemeche'. Eshu: The Divine Trickster. by George Chemeche, Vagner Gonçalves Da Silva, Donald J. Cosentino. Founded in 1997, BookFinder.

Horse Rider Paintings. Art Paintings Photos Illustrations Digital Art.

All horse rider paintings ship within 48 hours and include a 30-day money-back guarantee. Horse Rider Paintings. 1 - 72 of 3,801 horse rider paintings for sale.

The Horse Rider in African Art. George Chemeche. In 2010, The Cleveland Museum Of Art purchased 34 Congo sculptures from the Belgian Collectors Rene and Odette Delenne, many of which have not been published or exhibited. Africa: The Art of a Continent (African, Asian & Oceanic Art). This is one of the best-presented Museun Exhibition catalogues of tribal art I have seen, with really interesting essays on the figurative art of the Congo, and beautifully photographed Congo figures. Includes a fascinating study of the materials used to create a Songye power figure.

2011 Publishes, The Horse Rider in African Art ACC, UK. INDIVIDUAL EXHIBITIONS: 1978 Goldman Art Gallery . Banana, Pomegranate and glass of water George Chemeche. INDIVIDUAL EXHIBITIONS: 1978 Goldman Art Gallery, Haifa, Israel. 1977 Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York. Expressionist French Israeli Old City Jerusalem Modernist Landscape, 1967.

Horses are very rare in Africa. The few to be found west of Sudan, from the lands of the Sahara and Sahel down to the fringes of the tropical forests, belong to the king, the chief warrior and to notable persons. Due to the dense humidity of the tropical rainforest and the deadly tsetse fly, only restricted numbers of horses survive. And yet rider and mount sculptures are common among the Dogon, Djenne, Bamana, Senufo and the Yoruba people. The Akan-Asante people of Ghana and the Kotoko of Chad produced a good deal of small casting brass and bronze sculptures. Some of the artists could barely even have caught a glimpse of a horse.This visually stunning book presents a wealth of African art depicting the horse and its rider in a variety of guises, from Epa masks and Yoruba divination cups to Dogon sculptures and Senufo carvings. In Mali, the Bamana, Boso and Somono ethnic groups still celebrate the festivals of the puppet masquerade. The final chapter of this book is dedicated to the art and cult of these festivals, which are still alive and well.It is not the habit of the African artist to provide intellectual statements for his work, yet his unique creative dynamic and far-searching vision does not conflict with that of his Western counterpart. It is fair to state that the African, who though not educated in Western art history, contributed his fair share to the shaping of modern art.Features works from museums in both Africa and Europe, including the Musée Royal de L'Afrique Central, Tervuren in Belgium; Afrika Museum, Berg en Dal, Netherlands; Musée du quai Branly, Paris; Museum Rietberg, Zurich; The British Museum, London; Museu National de Antologia, Lisbon and National Museum, Lagos, Nigeria.
Wnex
Great information
Adoraris
Chemeche opens this learned study with bountiful color photographs by contrasting the African art incorporating horses with Western art. A statue of Alexander the Great, for instance, in Greece displays this Greek conqueror with sword drawn and cape flowing on a rearing horse representing Alexander as heroic and individual. Similar statues often of military figures are familiar throughout cities of Europe. By contrast, the African carvings incorporating horses represent beliefs about humanity, power, and society found throughout African tribal society in terms of particular tribal or regional styles or forms.

Horse and rider in African art compare with carvings of mother and child to depict the physical interaction and social significance of each; with the former representing power, protection, and rulership and the latter, nurture and bonding. The four following essays expand on Chemeche's introduction by closer study of particular regional or tribal art with horses in terms of historical examples as well as elements of the carvings and tribal values and beliefs. John Pemberton in his essay on Yoruba carvings discusses the role of cavalry in the expansion of one empire, and how different terrains from open plains to thick forests affected this expansion. Permberton's credentials as a professor emeritus of religion and African studies at Amherst College typify credentials of each of the authors.

After the essays come over 200 works of African art with horse riders (pages 41-377) grouped by their material of wood, metals, terra cotta, stone, ivory, and beads. There's a page for each carving except for a few pages where there are close-ups of a part a particular one. The high-quality photographs of the individual art works against a plain background allow for appreciation of color, details, and integration of elements as well as overall form. Points from the essays are found to be instructive in appreciating and understanding the many, varied sculptures ranging in style from naturalistic to abstract.

The expertise of the essays on basics and background of this field of African art is welcome. In addition to this the usually taken-for-granted visual matter is noteworthy. Notes at the back list the varied, extensive sources for this. Among these sources are museums, galleries, and auctions, but also reference to 24 private collections which are not named. Thus an extra effort has been made by the editor and the publisher to present an exceptional gathering of African sculptures which is not likely to be superseded or repeated. The authoritative essays with a direct, useful relationship to study of the sculptures of the book as well as supplementary content and the incomparable visual matter assure the book to be a permanent central, fundamental work in this area.
Soustil
The most useless book on african art yet published. The only essay worth reading is by John Pemberton, but one can't help but wonder why did he participate in this book ???
lind-peinture.fr
© All right reserved. 2017-2020
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
eBooks are provided for reference only