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eBook Defining Russia Musically ePub

by Richard Taruskin

eBook Defining Russia Musically ePub
Author: Richard Taruskin
Language: English
ISBN: 0691011567
ISBN13: 978-0691011561
Publisher: Princeton University Press (April 14, 1997)
Pages: 600
Category: Music
Subcategory: Photo
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 421
Formats: lrf lrf txt rtf
ePub file: 1291 kb
Fb2 file: 1329 kb

Defining Russia Musically: Historical and Hermeneutical essays (Princeton University Press, 1997).

Taruskin has also written extensively for lay readers, including numerous articles in The New York Times, many of which have been collected in Text and Act (in which he is an influential critic of the premises of the "historically informed performance" movement in classical music), The Danger of Music and Other Anti-Utopian Essays, and On Russian Music. Defining Russia Musically: Historical and Hermeneutical essays (Princeton University Press, 1997). The Oxford History of Western Music (6 vols. Oxford University Press, 2005, 2009; 2nd e. 5 vols. 2010) (Kinkeldey winner, 2006).

Defining Russia Musically: Historical and Hermeneutical Essays. More than a musicologist, Richard Taruskin is a cultural critic who deserves non-scholarly readers. Defining Russia Musically represents one of his landmark achievements: here Taruskin uses music, together with history and politics, to illustrate the many ways in which Russian national identity has been constructed, both from within Russia and from the Western perspective. He contends that it is through music that the powerful myth of Russia’s national character can best be understood.

Defining Russia Musically represents one of his landmark achievements: here Taruskin uses music, together with history and politics, to illustrate the many ways in which Russian national identity has been constructed.

Defining Russia Musically represents one of his landmark achievements: here Taruskin uses music, together with history and politics, to illustrate the many ways in which Russian national identity has been constructed, both from within Russia and from the Western perspective. He contends that it is through music that the powerful myth of Russia's "national character" can best be understood. The world-renowned musicologist Richard Taruskin has devoted much of his career to helping listeners appreciate Russian and Soviet music in new and sometimes controversial ways.

Over the past four decades, Richard Taruskin's publications have redefined the field of Russian-music study

Over the past four decades, Richard Taruskin's publications have redefined the field of Russian-music study. This volume gathers thirty-six essays on composers ranging from Bortnyansky in the eighteenth century to Tarnopolsky in the twenty-first.

The world-renowned musicologist Richard Taruskin has devoted much of his career to helping listeners appreciate Russian and Soviet music in new and sometimes controversial ways.

Richard Taruskin demonstrates Stravinsky's place in the specific cultural traditions of his homeland, pulling together with impressive intellectual breadth the influences of Russian music, art, literature, folklore, religious liturgy, and more. He illustrates the composer's legacy from Rimsky-Korsakov, Glazunov, Scriabin, and Tchaikovsky in the pre-Diaghilev period, and dazzles with his analysis of folk influence in "Petrushka" and on through the famously innovative, yet rooted "The Rite of Spring.

Defining Russia Musically : Historical and Hermeneutical Essays . By (author) Richard Taruskin. Richard Taruskin has again demonstrated that anything he writes leads to serious thinking and reevaluation of hitherto held views. His brilliant and alarmingly timely book Defining Russia Musically is about the battle for a nation's soul-fought between Europe and Asia, modernity and primitivism-in the music of Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich.

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Defining Russia Musically. Published by Princeton University Press, 1997. ISBN 10: 0691011567, ISBN 13: 9780691011561.

Name of book (Richard Taruskin). Defining Russia Musically: Historical and Hermeneutical Essays'. Victor Gorodinsky in the very first issue of 'Sovetskaya muzïka', but Shostakovich derided his efforts. What happened to the idea of socialist realism over the next few years? It was roughly defined in practice as a kind of heroic classicism. What was Shostakovich's first really heroic work? The Fifth Symphony, although arguably it could be his withdrawn Fourth.

The world-renowned musicologist Richard Taruskin has devoted much of his career to helping listeners appreciate Russian and Soviet music in new and sometimes controversial ways. Defining Russia Musically represents one of his landmark achievements: here Taruskin uses music, together with history and politics, to illustrate the many ways in which Russian national identity has been constructed, both from within Russia and from the Western perspective. He contends that it is through music that the powerful myth of Russia's "national character" can best be understood. Russian art music, like Russia itself, Taruskin writes, has "always [been] tinged or tainted ... with an air of alterity--sensed, exploited, bemoaned, reveled in, traded on, and defended against both from within and from without." The author's goal is to explore this assumption of otherness in an all-encompassing work that re-creates the cultural contexts of the folksong anthologies of the 1700s, the operas, symphonies, and ballets of the 1800s, the modernist masterpieces of the 1900s, and the hugely fraught but ambiguous products of the Soviet period.

Taruskin begins by showing how enlightened aristocrats, reactionary romantics, and the theorists and victims of totalitarianism have variously fashioned their vision of Russian society in musical terms. He then examines how Russia as a whole shaped its identity in contrast to an "East" during the age of its imperialist expansion, and in contrast to two different musical "Wests," Germany and Italy, during the formative years of its national consciousness. The final section, expanded from a series of Christian Gauss seminars presented at Princeton in 1993, focuses on four individual composers, each characterized both as a self-consciously Russian creator and as a European, and each placed in perspective within a revealing hermeneutic scheme. In the culminating chapters--Chaikovsky and the Human, Scriabin and the Superhuman, Stravinsky and the Subhuman, and Shostakovich and the Inhuman--Taruskin offers especially thought-provoking insights, for example, on Chaikovsky's status as the "last great eighteenth-century composer" and on Stravinsky's espousal of formalism as a reactionary, literally counterrevolutionary move.

Owomed
Taruskin-Defining Russia musically

The term hermeneutics is omitted from most recently published music dictionaries, but it is making a comeback in scholarly musicological studies. Increasingly, there is an attempt to understand works in their historical contexts rather than by application of possibly inappropriate analytic formulas or culturally biased aesthetic judgments, which are cited and "deconstructed" so as to make way for new interpretations. Taruskin, the leading American Russian music scholar .. here collects 14 essays on Russian art music and Russian-ness in general, most based on lectures he gave in 1993 and 1994. His usual originality, passionate arguments, and deep, broad research are present as Taruskin treats music by and scholarship on Glinka, Tchaikovsky, Scriabin, Stravinsky, Shostakovich, and others.
-Bonnie Jo Dopp, University of Maryland Library - From Library Journal, copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc

Taruskin's hallmarks are evident throughout: research of almost astonishing breadth, impatience with facile views and those who propound them, and contempt for formalist modes of analysis that ignore the extramusical. This is an important, challenging book; no other book in English covers this ground with equal depth or brilliance.
-Choice

As a regular user of his Oxford History of Western Music and reader of his more recent book on Russian music, I never seem to tire of Taruskin`s writings: lean, but knowledgeable well beyond the immediate musical context; not the proverbial specialist in generalities, rather a specialist and a generalist in one. With him, the symbiosis is natural, hence the strength of his understanding and the power of his knowledge. Communicates well and with a solid sense of humour.

obus5 - Taruskin-Defining Russia musically - 1/8/2012
Abandoned Electrical
Mr Taruskin is an excellent writer and knowledgeable musicologist. I read and learn from everything he writes.

However, I think the gushing over him calls out for some balance.

The 20th century made a lot of people uncomfortable.

The great modernist artists (Picasso, Joyce / Proust, Debussy / Stravinsky) put an end to the “clear” categories (perspective, narrative, tonality / form) of the 19th as sociopolitical modernism (women’s suffrage, worker’s rights, the Russian Revolution, the Irish Rising) spurred the process of ending the “clear” categories of gender, class, empire, and racial entitlement, and as modernist physics (Einstein, Bohr, Heisenberg, et al) was reducing determinism to an approximation (as opposed to s definition) of reality.

All these currents of understanding tend to terrify the unimaginative among us and reactionary historians and theorists (such as the present day creationists, climate change deniers, and “pick-up artists”) have no trouble finding an audience.

Taruskin is essentially a musicological conservative, made uncomfortable by the developments in the last century that moved away from the forms and tonalities of the "classical" era. As such he approaches a composer like Stravinsky (the most successful of all modernist musicians --pretty clearly the greatest composer of the 20th century) with an axe to grind. Stravinsky was a social climbing snob and as such participated in the bigotry of the upper classes of his time, which, sadly, included making denigrating remarks about "the jews" (see the film "Gentleman's Agreement"). Indefensible as that is, it is still a far cry from being a fascist or nazi (as some artists of the era certainly were). When they ascended to control in Europe, Stravinsky fled to the US. It's my feeling that Taruskin uses this gossipy tactic (which has nothing to do with music anyway) because he desperately wants to somehow diminish Stravinsky and his legacy (and by extension the more imaginative currents in the history of western music from Debussy onward). He seems to me to always come at "modernism" with the agenda of undermining it and this (to me anyway) knocks him down a peg or two from a genuine scholar to a propagandist.

To be completely honest, I have an agenda as well. I dislike conservatism wherever it rears its ugly head.

Just adding a grain of salt to the sugary stew of adulation he seems to be getting.
Kezan
Taruskin's name is associated by the experienced reader of Russian music books with texts of in-depth treatment, rigorous demands of his texts for clarity and entertaining style for the non-scholar reader. Defining Russian Music offers through a series of essays a description very accurate of what Russian music is from the beginning of the formation of a Russian musical identity to the Soviet period and, what I think is more important, why it shows these characteristics. A passage I found very interesting explains the origin of a Pushkin's poem and compares settings of it by three composers from different periods. A non rough-reading text, fully illustrated with musical examples, this book is a must-have for people who appreciate Russian composers and their work as all Taruskin's books up to now.
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