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eBook A Change Is Gonna Come: Music, Race And The Soul Of America ePub

by Craig Werner

eBook A Change Is Gonna Come: Music, Race And The Soul Of America ePub
Author: Craig Werner
Language: English
ISBN: 1841952966
ISBN13: 978-1841952963
Publisher: Canongate Books Ltd (September 1, 2002)
Pages: 448
Category: Music
Subcategory: Photo
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 443
Formats: rtf mobi lit docx
ePub file: 1381 kb
Fb2 file: 1214 kb

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. 1. Lennie Tristano: His Life in Music (Jazz Perspectives).

A Change Is Gonna Come: Music, Race & the Soul of America.

Originally published in 1998, A Change Is Gonna Come drew the attention of scholars and general readers alike. Craig Werner is Professor of Afro-American Studies at the University of Wisconsin, and author of many books, including Playing the Changes: From Afro-Modernism to the Jazz Impulse and Up Around the Bend: An Oral History of Creedence Clearwater Revival.

Werner, Craig Hansen, 1952-. African Americans, Popular music, African Americans, Music and race. Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; toronto.

A Change Is Gonna Come: . .has been added to your Basket. Craig Werner is a professor of African-American Studies at the University of Wisconsin, where he teaches courses on Black Music and American Cultural History

A Change Is Gonna Come: . Craig Werner is a professor of African-American Studies at the University of Wisconsin, where he teaches courses on Black Music and American Cultural History. He is the recipient of the Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching. He lives in Madison, Wisconsin.

A Change is Gonna Come chronicles more than forty years of black music: from the hopeful, angry refrains of the Freedom movement to the slick pop of Motown; from Woodstock and the ‘Summer of Love’ to Vietnam and the race riots; from disco inferno to the Million Man March

A Change is Gonna Come chronicles more than forty years of black music: from the hopeful, angry refrains of the Freedom movement to the slick pop of Motown; from Woodstock and the ‘Summer of Love’ to Vietnam and the race riots; from disco inferno to the Million Man March. This is an insightful and riveting study which looks at the place black music occupies in social history, its battle for the desegregation of popular music and its contribution to social change outside the recording studio.

Werner (Playing the Changes: From Afro-Modernism to the Jazz Impulse . A Change Is Gonna Come Mahalia Jackson Motown and the Movement.

Werner (Playing the Changes: From Afro-Modernism to the Jazz Impulse, Univ. of Illinois, 1994) charts the integrative influence of African American-based music on race relations in the United States. Пользовательский отзыв - Bakari - LibraryThing. Very insightful book that fuses the culture, history, and influence of the soul music era. Читать весь отзыв. 3. Mahalia and the Movement.

A Change is Gonna Come chronicles more than forty years of black music: from the hopeful, angry refrains of the Freedom movement to the slick pop of Motown; from Woodstock and the 'Summer of Love' to Vietnam and the race riots; from disco inferno to the Million Man March. This is an insightful and riveting study which looks at the place black music occupies in social history, its battle for the desegregation of popular music and its contribution to social change outside the recording studio show more.

A Change Is Gonna Come book. extraordinarily far-reaching. A Change Is Gonna Come is the story of more than four decades of enormously influential black music, from the hopeful, angry refrains of the Freedom movement, to the slick pop of Motown; from the disco inferno to the Million Man March; from Woodstock's "Summer of Love" to the war in Vietnam and the race riots that inspired Marvin Gaye to write. What's Going O. Originally published in 1998, A Change Is Gonna Come drew the attention of scholars and general readers alike.

A Change is Gonna Come chronicles more than forty years of black music: from the hopeful, angry refrains of the Freedom movement to the slick pop of Motown; from Woodstock and the 'Summer of Love' to Vietnam and the race riots; from disco inferno to the Million Man March. This is an insightful and riveting study which looks at the place black music occupies in social history, its battle for the desegregation of popular music and its contribution to social change outside the recording studio
Ynap
Needed for a college course
lolike
Good for history class.
Obong
This book actually is quite good. The only problem is the author fixates on certain artists. Since the book is in chronological order it plays like a movie starting with blues performers and also jazz. It jumps into the 60's rapidly and this is by far the most interesting section. Motown, Stax and the Philly Sound are defined well by the author. Each sub genre of black music seems to be tied to the equal rights movement. Not to sure there. Motown was highly polished music made for enjoyment and profit. Profit and capitalism per the author is what leaves the black man behind. Motown being the exception. Stax certainly let us hear the cry of the unequal black. The Philly Sound also aided equal rights. "Aint No Stopping Us Now" sure did a lot for the equal rights cause. Not. But, the redeeming chapters featured Sly Stone, Gil Scott-Heron and Curtis Mayfield. All three are unique in the history of black music. Sly used an Integrated band and sang of solutions. Gil is my favorite in your face black singer. But Curtis Mayfield somehow ties hope with faith undertones. The fixation artists include Elvis Presley and Bruce Springsteen. Too much time is spent on both. Paragraph after paragraph tells us that artist A hated Elvis and artist B didn't. And the overdone chapters with Springsteen being the emancipation man just don't totally add up. I thoroughly enjoyed the rap and hip hop chapters as I really found these genres unlistenable. The author helped me to understand the message and truly defined every major artist and background. I still find the music vulgar, but must admit I get the message. From the rich kids Run- DMC to Tupac and the ghetto this author made reading this part fun. My favorite black artist has always been Curtis Mayfield. He touches my soul with every song. His final album Brave New World was recorded as Curtis laid paralyzed from an accident. Read this book and then listen to the album. They should be sold together. I am white and lived in all white neighborhoods growing up. A black man was an oddity for me. But, I eventually met many new people of all races as I moved to Philadelphia in my teens. The music I grew up with was what this book reveals. The author expanded my knowledge of already loved artists. Sadly today blacks still have trouble in our world. This shouldn't be. Music touches many a hard soul and softens the heart. One of my favorite lines in the book was when Paul Simon won a Grammy award in 1975 and thanked Stevie Wonder for not releasing an album that year. Innervisions, Talking Book and Songs in The Key of Life are also nice albums that compliment this book. May the music we hear help us to treat other with love and respect
Leniga
Talk about a breath of fresh air. Unfortunately, the popular music literature out there seems to fall into two camps. The first populates journalism school dropouts who, because of their love for the music, feel the need to share their passion with the whole wide world. Their writings are usually superficial and they're the crowd Dylan complained about when he said (paraphrase), "they're a bunch of 40 year olds writing for a bunch of 10 year olds." The other group is made up of academics who, though often having brilliant insights, are more often impenetrable to the masses of popular music listeners. Indeed, this ilk is just as likely to write *about* listeners rather than for them.
Craig Werner skillfully accomplishes what only a handful have done before him: marrying the insights of a well read, thoughtful academic with a down-to-earth (way far away from any ivory tower), yet passionate style of writing. Using the "calls" and "responses" found in black music (and communities) and the "impulses" of gospel, blues and jazz, Werner seamlessly connects such varied artists as Mahalia Jackson, Bob Marley, Bruce Springsteen, Public Enemy, Madonna, Prince, Duke Ellington, Ani Difranco, and seemingly hundreds more. Though the "huh?" factor may be high at times (the jazz impulse includes Neil Young's "Arc"), through fresh, direct insights an "oh yeah" factor always neutralizes it (usually within a page or two).
The subtitle of the book suggests this is an explanation of "music, race and the soul of America." Well, it's not. This is merely Werner's "response," based on the many "calls" he writes of in his book. This is now my "response" to Werner's "call" - Wow, you gotta read this book.
Ichalote
A Change is Gonna Come is a landmark book in the history of the rock/race conversation, because Werner - a white professor of Afro-American studies - has a deeper understanding of the meaning of whiteness than any other rock historian I've seen. It makes a huge difference that Werner is both an anti-racist, and is comfortable in his own skin - this comfort allows him to navigate the culture-theft accusations and counter-accusations without needing to pick sides.
Ť.ħ.ê_Ĉ.õ.о.Ł
I really enjoyed the richness of the book.it covers so-many styles and History.it is very well written book.it covers alot of bases.The Different time frames and their Impact.My Only dig is that Music Writers don't acknowledge Michael Jackson enough.face The Music who has had his kind of Impact over the Last 20-30 years?also he didn't really cover the title in depth but i understand.still a must Read.
Anaginn
Marvellous stuff. Possibly the best book to be written about music and popular culture for quite some time. Determinedly in the tradition of Greil Marcus & Peter Guralnick, the book re-writes the now well-told tale of "rock" music's history, from what is perhaps the only true perspective - that is, race. Read it.
Well, I know I'm in the minority here. But a real history of the connection between music and race in America is something that it desperately needed. One might expect an academic historian to have provided that. But this book is NOT a good history - it's highly impressionistic and rather anecdotal and full of ideas that aren't exactly explained. It jumps around from chapter to chapter making much of the impressions that the author has about the 'hidden' messages within songs, but I'm afraid that he states rather than argues or proves his case. I hope someone out there DOES write the book that's needed. In the meantime this one is interesting if the style doesn't bother you too much.
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