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eBook The Dancing Goddesses: Folklore, Archaeology, and the Origins of European Dance ePub

by Elizabeth Wayland Barber

eBook The Dancing Goddesses: Folklore, Archaeology, and the Origins of European Dance ePub
Author: Elizabeth Wayland Barber
Language: English
ISBN: 0393065367
ISBN13: 978-0393065367
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1st edition (February 11, 2013)
Pages: 448
Category: Performing Arts
Subcategory: Photo
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 309
Formats: azw mbr azw rtf
ePub file: 1828 kb
Fb2 file: 1409 kb

Barber s sprightly study of European dance will be the go-to resource for years to come This book is an archeologist's ode to her passion for Eastern European folk dance. Parts are erudite, and full of fascinating facts about the region's culture and history.

Barber s sprightly study of European dance will be the go-to resource for years to come. An impressive study that weaves together dance, folklore, culture, and mythology. Elizabeth Wayland Barber is the author of Women’s Work and The Mummies of Ürümchi. Professor emerita of archaeology and linguistics at Occidental College, she lives in California. This book is an archeologist's ode to her passion for Eastern European folk dance. She explains, for instance, why the colors of white, red and black are so popular.

Elizabeth Wayland Barber is a folkdancer, archaeologist and lin-. of European Dance she analyses deeply how the belief in mystical. In The Dancing Goddesses: Folklore, Archaeology, and the Origins. female spirits has developed not only into ritual dances for fertility. and healing but also in a variety of customs and traditions of villag

In The Dancing Goddesses, archaeologist, linguist, and lifelong folkdancer Elizabeth Wayland Barber follows the trail of these spirit maidens-long associated with fertility, marriage customs, and domestic.

In The Dancing Goddesses, archaeologist, linguist, and lifelong folkdancer Elizabeth Wayland Barber follows the trail of these spirit maidens-long associated with fertility, marriage customs, and domestic pursuits-from their early appearance in traditional folktales and harvest rituals to their more recent incarnations in fairytales and present-day dance.

The Dancing Goddesses book. Barber, Professor Emerita of Archeology and Linguistics at Occidental College, sets out to document the origins of dance in the region ranging from Crete through the Balkans to the Baltic.

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Elizabeth Wayland Barber. The Dancing Goddesses. Exploring European Folkdance History. Writing The Dancing Goddesses (.

Elizabeth Jane "Betchen" Wayland Barber (also E. J. W. Barber) is an American scholar and expert on archaeology, linguistics, textiles, and folk dance as well as Professor emerita of archaeology and linguistics at Occidental College. Wayland Barber was born in 1940, in Pasadena. She became interested in archaeology at a young age because of her love interdisciplinary sciences. Her family moved to France during her childhood, where she learned French, beginning her interest in linguistics.

The Dancing Goddesses : Folklore, Archaeology, and the Origins of European Dance. by Elizabeth Wayland Barber. From southern Greece to northern Russia, people have long believed in female spirits, bringers of fertility, who spend their nights and days dancing in the fields and forests. So appealing were these spirit-maidens that they also took up residence in nineteenth-century Romantic literature.

Elizabeth Wayland Barber writes about dancing as a means of influencing the progress of life-of assuring that families and land are fertile and that communities draw together in mutual purpose. She begins The Dancing Goddesses with an exploration of female forest and water spirits prominent in the folklore and folkways of Eastern and Central Europe. These ruslaki, willis, and mermaids are the spirits of young women who died before having children and whose unused fertility might be tapped by others.

A fascinating exploration of an ancient system of beliefs and its links to the evolution of dance.

From southern Greece to northern Russia, people have long believed in female spirits, bringers of fertility, who spend their nights and days dancing in the fields and forests. So appealing were these spirit-maidens that they also took up residence in nineteenth-century Romantic literature. Archaeologist and linguist by profession, folk dancer by avocation, Elizabeth Wayland Barber has sleuthed through ethnographic lore and archaeological reports of east and southeast Europe, translating enchanting folktales about these “dancing goddesses” as well as eyewitness accounts of traditional rituals―texts that offer new perspectives on dance in agrarian society. She then traces these goddesses and their dances back through the Romans and Greeks to the first farmers of Europe. Along the way, she locates the origins of many customs, including coloring Easter eggs and throwing rice at the bride. The result is a detective story like no other and a joyful reminder of the human need to dance. 150 illustrations and 9 maps
Gagas
This book is an archeologist's ode to her passion for Eastern European folk dance. Parts are erudite, and full of fascinating facts about the region's culture and history. She explains, for instance, why the colors of white, red and black are so popular. Why embroidery goes around the neck and sleeves (to protect the wearer from evil spirits), why some dances go clockwise and others the reverse, why dances from some regions have "regular" beats, such as 3/4 or 4/4, and other regions have odder ones like 7/8, 9/8, etc. Why Western Europe does partner dances, and Eastern Europe does line dances.

My favorite parts of the book, however, and the ones that will stick most in my mind, are about Balkan dances themselves. As an avid folk dancer in my teens, I had an intuitive understanding of the sacredness of these dances. Barber explains where this comes from, namely the ritual nature of the dances themselves, which were used to ensure fertility and connect with earth and water goddesses.

She had two quotes in the book from William McNeill, author of Keeping Together in Time, about the psychological effects of soldiers marching together. I absolutely loved these, because it was the first time I had ever seen anybody describe the magic of moving in unison with a group of people -- in the case of dancing, to timeless tunes and rhythms:

"Marching aimlessly about on the drill field, swaggering in conformity with prescribed military postures, conscious only of keeping in step so as to make the next move correctly and in time somehow felt good... A sense of pervasive well-being is what I recall; more specifically, a strange sense of personal enlargement; a sort of swelling out, becoming bigger than life, thanks to participation in collective ritual... It was something felt, not talked about ... Moving briskly and keeping in time was enough to make us feel good about ourselves, satisfied to be moving together, and vaguely pleased with the world at large."

"the emotion it arouses constitutes an indefinitely expansible basis for social cohesion among any and every group that keeps together in time,moving big muscles together and chanting, singing, or shouting rhythmically. 'Muscular bonding' is the most economical label I could find for this phenomenon, and I hope the phrase will be understood to mean the euphoric fellow feeling that prolonged and rhythmic muscular movement arouses in nearly all participants in such exercises."

Isn't that beautiful? Isn't that exactly what a person feels in something like folk dance?

I will keep this book as a reference for a long time.
Mash
Dr Barber continues to amaze me with the amount of accessible, easily-readable material she includes in her writing. I have read three of her books and there is very little duplication between any; in fact at some point, it becomes virtually necessary to have read other works to better understand what she is conveying in the current work! Highly recommend; and note: Her titles do not limit the scope of what you will find inside! Looking forward to her next volume.
Rigiot
A treasure trove of insight, woven into a mystery to be solved. Good for those who like detail, but those folks are likely to get lost in the woods. This reveals the origins and meanings of customs we don't even know are rooted in ancient times.
JOIN
This book is well researched and presented. It is a great book for lay-readers, in part because it includes a bibliography and citations for further reading. I used this book as one of my background texts when I taught a short class in ballet history at a summer ballet intensive.
Agrainel
Very dry, academic, but interesting. Kept wanting to shout, uh "Shamanism", the purpose of much of the dancing and ritual - she finally gets to that way after the middle. Still, if you like dance history of folk and ancient dances, this should be on your shelf. For a more engaging read, see Barbara Eihrenriech's "Dancing in the Streets".
Wilalmaine
Like Barber's other popular books, this one is lively and easy to read, yet based on her own wide-ranging and deep scholarship.
Cogelv
Wow, she ties together so many of the strands I've been exploring in the last several years in a very readable style. It makes a much more coherent whole now. This covers a lot about folk dances, early neolithic culture, traditional life in the balkans in closer to modern times, mythic understandings, women's lives and work, folk tales, seasonal customs, and textiles in a way that gently uncovers connections between them all.

Recommended for people who are interested in folk dancing, balkan traditional culture, the culture of the earliest agriculturalists, the history of women's lives and work, and / or mythic understandings of the world.
Best book I have read on European cultural history, ever.
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